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is also a bitter feeling against the United States because of the belief that the Government of the United States has encouraged the secession movement, and of the statement of telegram received by the Government to the effect that the United States forces interfered with Colombian troops under General Tobar at Colon, necessitating their surrender.

An army ten thousand strong being raised here, and one of five thousand in the Cauca to operate against Panama, commanded by General Reyes, provided the United States will allow Colombia to land troops.

A meeting was held under the leadership of Senator Caro, and a resolution was passed requesting the Government to call a convention for the purpose of amending the constitution in order to render possible immediate ratification of the treaty. This is opposed by the Government and General Reyes as being iropportune.

BEAUPRÉ.

Mr. Ilay to Mr. Beaupré.
[Telegram.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, November 11, 1903. (Sent 12.12 p. m.) Earnestly desiring an amicable solution of matters at issue between Colombia and Panama, we have instructed our consul-general at Panama to use good offices to secure for General Reyes a courteous reception and considerate hearing. It is not thought desirable to permit landing of Colombian troops on Isthmus, as such a course would precipitate civil war and disturb for an indefinite period the free transit which we are pledged to protect. I telegraphed you on November 6 that we had entered into relations with the provisional government.

HAY.

Mr. Beaupré to Mr. Hay.

[Telegram.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES, Bogotá, November 12, 1903. (Received November 14.) I was invited to the Palace last night to confer with the President and his Cabinet, and communicated the substance of your telegram of the 6th in the form of a note to the minister of foreign affairs. I was asked if I would officially construe the last clause to mean the United States would not permit the landing of Colombi'ın troops. I replied my opinion is that the language used needs no interpretation; that I had fulfilled my official duty in delivering the note and had no explanation to make. The President then enjoined sec:ecy upon those present until direct answer has been received to the two questions of the minister for foreign affairs contained in my telegram of the 7th.

There is consternation in Government circles, and I fear serious trouble when the public is informed of the real situation. I believe there is much danger, not only to the Government, but also to Americans in the interior, especially in Bogota.

BEAUPRÉ.

Mr. Beaupré to Mr. Ilay.

[Telegram.] .

UNITED STATES LEGATION, Bogotá, November 14, 1903. (Received November 17.) In an official note, dated 14th, minister for foreign affairs writes me as follows:

The immediate recognition of the so-called Government of Panama by the Government of the United States entering into relations with it is a circumstance aggravated by the fact that such recognition is a violation of the treaty of 1846, which com pels the Government of Colombia to protest, as it does in most solemn and emphatic manner, and to consider that the friendship of this Government with the Government of the United States has reached such a grave point that it is not possible to continue diplomatic relations unless the Government of the United States states that it is not its intention to interfere with Colombia in obtaining submission of the Isthmus nor to recognize the rebels as belligerents. I hope you will submit these points to your Government immediately, for the army is already marching to the Isthmus of Panama.

The note is very long, to the effect that this recognition is contrary to all precedents and in violation of the treaty of 1846, offering to submit the latter point to The Hague, with the understanding that in the meantime there shall be no interference with the military operations necessary to reestablish integrity of Colombia.

National council-especially elected to advise the executive in the present emergency--has decided, by 10 votes to 1, to hand me my passport. The Government understands that such action would be tantamount to a declaration of war, and has advised me such a step will not be taken. Send instructions as a guide in case of severance of diplomatic relations.

BEAUPRÉ.

Mr. Beaupré to Mr. Ilay.

[Telegram.]

UNITED STATES LEGATION, Bogotá, November 17, 1903. (Received November 19.) Minister for foreign affairs sends another note, requesting that I transmit by cable an abstract, as follows:

As the Government of the United States does not definitely state that it will oppose landing of Colombian troops, but will secure hearing for General Reyes, it may be supposed its purpose is to bring about peace in Colombia and Panama, to the end that the latter shall renounce independence and thus avoid armed action otherwise inevitable. If this is the intention of the United States, Colombia will accept, provided territorial rights of Colombia on the Isthmus are not prejudiced. Maintenance of order falls to the power holding sovereignty, which the United States has heretofore recognized. Accordingly, it is an inadmissible theory that the United States should now permit or aid dismemberment of Colombia merely to prevent temporary disturbance of the transit. Colombia has for fifty years maintained free transit, but she can not be asked to carry this to the extent of agreeing to the loss of precious territory simply from fear some interruption of transmit may occur. Sovereignty of nations may not be destroyed for the purpose of avoiding transitory prejudice to commerce—an argument as to the effect of the existing treaty, and that civilization will suffer more by the violation of a public treaty than a temporary interruption of traffic. The most efficient means the United States could employ to prevent interruption of transit would be to notify rebels to abstain from obstructing Colombian Government in reestablishing order and constitutional rule. This is demanded of the United States by treaty. If the United States troops have been used to disarm Colombian army it is in subversion of national sovereignty and contrary to the treaty.

BEAUPRÉ.

Mr. Hay to Mr. Beaupré.
[Telegram.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, November 18, 1903. You will once more inform Colombian Government that we have recognized the Republic of Panama; that our action has been taken in the interest of peace and order on the Isthmus; that we earnestly desire an amicable settlement of questions at issue between Colombia and Panama, and would gladly render what services are in our power to that end.

I repeat that you and the secretary of legation are authorized to take your leave of absence whenever you think best, requesting one of your colleagues to take charge of your legation, if both of you come away.

Har.

REVOLUTION ON THE ISTHMUS OF PANAMA AND ESTABLISH

MENT OF INDEPENDENT REPUBLIC.

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, TRANSMITTING, IN

RESPONSE TO RESOLUTION OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF NOVEMBER 9, 1903, ALL CORRESPONDENCE AND OTHER OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE RECENT REVOLUTION ON THE ISTHMUS OF PANAMA.

To the House of Representatives:

In response to a resolution of the House of Representatives of November 9, 1903, requesting the President “to communicate to the House if not, in his judgment, incompatible with the interests of the public service, all correspondence and other official documents relating to the recent revolution on the Isthmus of Panama," I transmit herewith copies of the papers called for.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT. WHITE HOUSE, Washington, November 16, 1903.

The PRESIDENT:

The Secretary of State, to whom was referred a copy of the resolution of the House of Representatives of November 9, 1903, requesting copies of all correspondence and other official documents relating to the recent revolution on the Isthmus of Panama, has the honor to lay before the President copies of the correspondence from and to the Department of State on the subject. Respectfully submitted.

John Hay. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, November 13, 1903.

CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND THE

UNITED STATES CONSULATE-GENERAL AT PANAMA.

A press bulletin having announced an outbreak on the Isthmus, the following cablegram was sent both to the consulate-general at Panama and the consulate at Colon:

[Telegram.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, November 3, 1903. (Sent 3.40 p. m.) Uprising on Isthmus reported. Keep Department promptly and fully informed.

LOOMIS.

Mr. Ehrman to Mr. Hay.

PANAMA, November 3, 1903.

(Received 8.15 p. m.) No uprising yet. Reported will be in the night. Situation is critical.

EHRMAN.

Mr. Ehrman to Mr. Hay.

[Telegram.]
Panama, November 3, 1903.

(Received 9.50 p. m.) Uprising occurred to-night, 6; no bloodshed. Army and navy officials taken prisoners. Government will be organized to-night, consisting three consuls, also cabinet. Soldiers changed. Supposed same movement will be effected in Colon. Order prevails so far. Situation serious. Four hundred soldiers landed Colon to-day Barranquilla.

EHRMAN.

Mr. Loomis to Mr. Ehrman.

[Telegram.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, November 3, 1903. (Sent 11.18 p. m.) Message sent to Nashville to Colon may not have been delivered. Accordingly see that following message is sent to Nashville immediately: NASHVILLE, Colon:

In the interests of peace make every effort to prevent Government troops at Colon from proceeding to Panama. The transit of the Isthmus must be kept open and order maintained. Acknowledge.

DARLING, Acting. Secure special train, if necessary. Act promptly.

LOOMIS.

Mr. Loomis to Mr. Ehrman.

[Telegram.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, November 4, 1903. (Sent 12.02 p. m.) Communicate with commander of gunboat Bogotá and state plainly that this Government, being responsible for maintaining peace and keeping transit open across Isthmus, desires him to refrain from wantonly shelling the city. We shall have a naval force at Panama in two days, and are now ordering men from the Nashville to Panama in the interests of peace.

LOOMIS.

Mr. Ehrman to Mr. Hay.

[Telegram.]
PANAMA, November 4, 1903.

(Received 7.10 p. m.) Mass meeting held. Independence publicly declared. Three consuls approved organize government, composed Federico Boyd, José Agustin Arango, Tomas Arias. Bogotá in sight.

EHRMAN.

Mr. Ehrman to Mr. Hay.

[Telegram.]
PANAMA, November 4, 1903.

(Received 9.50 a. m.) Cables Nashville received. Nashville notified. Troops will not be moved. Last night gunboat Bogotá fired several shells on city; one Chinaman killed. Bogotá threatens bombard city to-day.

EHRMAN.

Mr. Ehrman to Mr. Hay.

[Telegram.]
PANAMA, November 5, 1903.

(Received 12.50 p. m.) Received an official circular letter from the committee of the provisional government saying that on 4th political move occurred, and the Department of Panama withdraws from the Republic of the United States of Colombia and formed the Republic of Panama. Requested to acknowledge the receipt of circular letter.

EHRMAN.

Mr. Loomis to Mr. Ehrman.

[Telegram.1

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, November 5, 1903. (Sent 3.15 p. m.) Acknowledge the receipt of circular letter and await instructions before taking any further action in this line.

LOOMIS.

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