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political relations with the Republic of Colombia and requesting me to acknowledge receipt of circular. Inclosed please find translation of circular letter, marked "A." I immediately cabled the Department the contents of said circular letter, and upon receipt of the Department's cable instructing me to acknowledge receipt of circular and await instructions, I wrote acknowledging same. Please find copy of my letter, marked “B.”

On receipt of the two telegrams from the Department in regard to entering into relations with the local authorities. here, being satisfied that there was a de facto government established, and as there was no opposition to same in the State of Panama, I wrote on the morning of the 7th to the committee, informing them that they would be held responsible for the protection of the persons and property of American citizens, as well as responsible for carrying out treaty obligations, in accordance with treaties in regard to Isthmian territory. Inclosed please find copy of my letter, marked “C.” . On the afternoon of the 8th instant I received a letter from the minister of foreign relations, saying that the Republic of Panama would protect American citizens and their property, as well as to carry out all treaty obligations in regard to Isthmian territory. Inclosed find translation of letter, marked “ D.” I am, sir, your obedient servant,

Felix EHRMAN, United States Vice-Consul-General.

[Translation.]

CIRCULAR

REPUBLIC OF PANAMA, PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT, No. 1.

Panama, November 4, 1903. SIR: We have the honor of informing you, for your knowledge and that of the Government which you represent, that in this date a political movement has taken place by which the former department of Panama is separated from the Republic of Colombia, in order to constitute a new state under the name of “ Republic of Panama," and that those who subscribe themselves have received the honor of being designated to form the Committee of the Provisional Government of the Republic.

We beg you to kindly acknowledge receipt and accept the sentiments of consideration, which it is pleasing to subscribe ourselves. Your attentive servants,

J. A. ARANGO. TOMAS ARIAS.

FEDERICO Boyd. The CONSUL-GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA, Pte.

PANAMA, November 5, 1903. Messrs. J. A. ARANGO, TOMAS ARIAS, and FEDERICO BOYD,

Committee of the Provisional Government, Panama. SIRS: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your circular letter No. 1, dated November 4, 1903. I am, sirs, very respectfully, yours,

Felix EHRMAN, United States Vice-Consul-General.

Panama, November 7, 1903. Messrs. J. A. ARANGO, TOMAS Arias, and FEDERICO BOYD,

Committee of the Provisional Government, present. GENTLEMEN: As it appears that the people of Panama have, by unanimous move. ment, dissolved their political connection with the Republic of Colombia and resumed their independence, and as there is no opposition to the Provisional Government in the State of Panama, I have to inform you that the Provisional Government will be held responsible for the protection of the persons and property of citizens of the United States, as well as to keep the Isthmian transit free, in accordance with obligations of existing treaties relative to the Isthmian territory. I have the honor to remain, gentlemen, very respectfully,

FELIX EHRMAN, United States Vice-Consul-General.

[Translation.]

No. 2.)

REPUBLIC OF PANAMA,

Panama, November 8, 1903. Sir: The Committee of the Provisional Government, informed of your communi. cation of yesterday, has requested me to inform you that the Republic of Panama shelters the most sincere determination of protecting, as it has so far protected, the lives and properties of the United States citizens, determination that involves for the Republic a sacred and pleasant duty, and that in regard to the obligations existing on account of treaties in connection with the Isthmian territories heretofore with the Republic of Colombia are now with the Republic of Panama that has substituted the former in them and their rights. With the sentiments of the highest consideration, I beg to remain, Very attentive servant,

F. V. DE LA ESPRIELLA. The VICE-CONSUL-GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Mr. Ehrman to Mr. Loomis.
No. 463.] CONSULATE-GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES,

Panama, November 9, 1903. Sir: I have the honor to report that on the 3d of November, at about 6 p. m., there occurred an uprising in the city of Panama. It seems that everything had been prearranged with the officials of the army and navy, as there was practically accord among all the officers. General Tovar, General Castro, and Commander Tovar, of the gunboat Bogotá, finding out about the movement just a short while before it occurred, rushed to the barracks in the hope of frustrating the plans, but on their arrival General Huertas, second in command of the troops stationed at Panama, and chief of the “Colombia Battalion," ordered the soldiers out and arrested the above-mentioned generals, together with Governor Obaldia. The movement was to occur at 8 o'clock, but as the people had assembled and everything in readiness they moved at 6 o'clock. At 8 o'clock a boat was sent off from the gunboat Bogotá, saying that unless Generals Tovar and Castro were set at liberty immediately they would bombard the town. This note was not answered by the people on shore.

* At about 10 o'clock on the night of the 3d the Bogotá fired several shells, which were answered by the fort. These shots struck in different parts of the city, and one Chinaman was killed. After firing, the Bogotá hoisted her anchor and steamed away. She was supposed to be behind some islands which are directly in front of Panama. On the morning of the 4th I received information direct from one of the chiefs of the movement, and he said that the Bogotá had threatened to again bombard the city, and on this I immediately sent word by telegraph to the commander of the Nashville and cabled the Department. The consular corps met in this consulate-general and clecided to send a protest to the commander of the Bogotá, protesting against the action of the commander. Inclosed please find copy of protest, marked “A.” This letter was not sent, as the Bogotá was not in sight and no boats were available at the time. The gunboat Twenty-first of November (Padilla) was lying off Panama all this time, but did not try to intercept or pursue the Bogotá. On the morning of the 4th the Twentyfirst of November came in and anchored near the fort, and in the afternoon of the same day hauled down the Colombian flag and hoisted the flag of Panama. In the afternoon of the 4th, at 3 p. m., there was a general mass meeting held in the central plaza, and the declaration of independence was read and signed. The following is a list of the Government officials, as given me by the Committee of the Provisional Government:

Committee of Provisional Government, J. A. Arango, Tomas Arias, and Federico Boyd; minister of government, Eusebio A. Morales; minister of foreign relations, F. V. de la Espriella; minister of war and marine, Nicanor A. de Óbarrio; minister of justice, Carlos A. Mendoza; minister of finance, Manuel E. Amador; minister of public instruction, Julio J. Fabrega; chief of the division of Panama, Gen. Domingo Diaz; general in chief of the army of the Republic, Gen. Esteban Huertes; commander of civil battalion, Gen. Manuel Quintero; general treasurer of the Republic, Señor Albino Arosemena; commander of the gunboat Twenty-first of November, Gen. H. O. Jeffries.

I may say that the above-mentioned are all men of high standing in Panama and men who have had wide experience in public affairs.

During the recent troubles I am pleased to state that everything was carried on in an orderly manner, and I have not heard of a case where foreigners were threatened or molested in any way.

Inclosed I send you clipping from the Star and Herald of this city, containing a translation of the declaration of independence and manifesto by the Committee of the Provisional Government, marked "B."

We have heard several stories of the happenings in Colon, but I will leave that to be reported on from Colon, as we have received nothing definite. The declaration of independence was read and signed at Colon at 1.30 p. m. on the afternoon of the 5th instant.

Telegrams have been received from different parts of the department of Panama, and all say that independence has been unanimously declared. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

FELIX EHRMAN, United States Vice-Consul-General.

A.
[Translation.]

Panama, November 4, 1903. The COMMANDER OF THE Bogotá.

Sir: The consular corps of this city considers the action of the steamship Bogotá, under your command, last night in bombarding a defenseless city without advice of any kind to the consuls is contrary to all rights and practice of civilized nations. Consequently the consular corps protests in the most solemn manner, and holds responsible for the consequences and responsibilities of this act whoever is to blame, furnishing account to their respective governments of the referred circumstance. Yours, respectfully,

FELIX EHRMAN,
United States Vice-Consul-General.

E. H. ROHRWEGER,

Acting British Vice-Consul.
EMILE GREY,
Agent of the French Consulate.

ARTHUR KOHPCKE,
Consul of Germany and in charge of Italian Consulate.

A. JESURUM, Jr.,

Consul of Holland.
ED. JARAMILLO AVILES,

Consul of Ecuador.
J. F. ARANGO,
Consul-General of Guatemala.

FEDERICO Boyd,
Consul of Spain and of Salvador.
JACOB L. MADURO,

Consul of Denmark.
B. D. FIDANQUE,

Consul of Belgica. J. G. DUQUE,

Consul of Cuba. B. MENDEZ,

Consul of Mexico.
PEDRO ARIAS,

Consul of Brazil.
JERONIMO OSSA,
Consul of Chile and Honduras.
JUAN VALLARINO,

Consul of Peru.

Declaration of independence and manifesto. [Extract from Star and Herald, Panama (Republic of Panama), Thursday, November 5, 1903.)

INDEPENDENCE OF PANAMA.

“Viva la República de Panama!” “Viva la independencia!"

At last the State of Panama has awakened from the torpor which appeared to have overpowered all branches of its population. The people have at last come to the conclusion that there was no hope for their future as long as they remained under the jurisdiction of the national Government as a department of the Republic of Colombia, and have risen in a body to protest to the injustice meditated by the Bogotá Government toward them in refusing its sanction to the Herran-Hay canal treaty, the passing of which treaty actually means life or death to the State of Panama.

The cry of independence was started on the evening of the 3d and taken up by every Isthmian as one body, as well as all those in sympathy with the cause. Due to the celebrated Battalion Colombia, under the command of their intrepid and universally beloved commander, Gen. E. Huertas, being in sympathy with the movement and declaring themselves on the side of the "separatists," all bloodshed, fighting, etc., has been avoided, the greatest order and unity reigning on all sides. The populace repaired, without distinction, to the arsenal and were supplied with the necessary arms with which to uphold their independence.

The movement had been planned to take place later on, but was precipitated by the arrival at Colon of 300 troops under command of Generals Tovar and Amaya on the Cartagena on the night of the 2d instant. The only deplorable incident has been the killing of two Chinamen and part destruction of two buildings in the city by some shells thrown from the cruiser Bogotá, the commander of which refused his adhesion to the cause and threatened to bombard the city unless Generals Tovar and Amaya and their staffs, who were imprisoned on the afternoon of the 3d while attempting to take command of the garrison in this city, were released within three hours.

This request was not acceeded to, in consequence of which the threat was carried out, but as the ship has got very little coal and supplies there is no doubt that she will not be able to hold out long and will have to surrender to the 21 de Noviembre, which is being gotten ready for giving chase. The consular corps met and signed the following formal protest:

PANAMA, November 4, 1903. The COMMANDER OF THE Bogotá.

Sir: The consular corps of this city considers the action of the steamship Bogotá, under your command, last night in bombarding a defenseless city, without advice of any kind to the consuls, is contrary to all right and practice of civilized nations. Consequently, the consular corps protests in the most solemn manner, and holds responsible for the consequences and responsibilities of this act whoever is to blame, furnishing account to their respective governments of the referred-to circumstance. Yours, respectfully,

Felix EHRMAN,
United States Vice-Consul-General.

E. H. RoHRWEG ER,

Acting British Vice-Consul.
EMILE GREY,
Agent of the French Consulate.

ARTHUR KOEHPCKE,
Consul of Germany and in Charge of the Italian Consulate.

A. JESURUM, Jr.,

Consul of Holland.
Ep. JARAMILLO AVILES,

Consul of Ecuador.
I. F. ARANGO,
Consul-General of Guatemala.

FEDERICO Boyd,
Consul of Spain and of Salvador.
JACOB L. MADURO,

Consul of Denmark.
B. D. FIDANQUE,

Consul of Belgica. J. G. DUQUE,

Consul of Cuba. B. MENDEZ,

Consul of Mexico.
PEDRO ARIAS,

Consul of Brazil.
JERONIMO Ossa,
Consul of Chile and Honduras.
JUAN VALLARINO,

Consul of Peru.

In compliance with an invitation stuck up and distributed all over the city by the municipal board, Demetrio H. Brid, president, a public meeting of all the corporations, civilians, military and religious bodies took place at 3 p. m. yesterday at the Cathedral Park, where the act of independence was signed by the members of the municipality, the chiefs of the Provisional Government, etc., after which patriotic speeches were delivered in profusion.

The Provisional Government has been composed of the following gentlemen: José Agustin Arango, Federico Boyd, and Tomás Arias, with the following ministers: State, E. A. Morales; treasury, M. E. Amador; justice, C. A. Mendoza; foreign relations, F. V. de la Espriella; war and navy, N. A. de Obarrio.

FR 1903- 17

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