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ulation for the judicial power. Pinto. Felipe Martinez. I am, etc., J. Pinto. I am of the minister with all consideration, etc., Juan J. Argueta."

On placing the foregoing report before your excellency, I have the pleasure of renewing, etc.,

Juan BARRIOS M.

[Inclosure 3.]
Mr. Combs to Mr. Ton.
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Guatemala, June 2, 1903. DEAR SIR: Referring to your complaint dated the 11th ultimo, relating to the sentence of the alcalde of Amatitlan being excessive and requesting my intervention, I beg to report the receipt of a note from the minister of foreign affairs of Guatemala, in which, in quoting the opinion of the attorney-general, it is recognized that the fine or penalty imposed by the alcalde was excessive, three days' imprisonment being the most he was authorized under the law and the circumstances to impose; and that, as you had already undergone the extent of punishment that said alcalde was authorized to impose, he is ordered to return the sum paid by you in commutation of your sentence and inform you of this fact without delay, in addition to being reprimanded.

In case the fine paid by you has not been returned you may apply for it, advising me of the result. Sincerely, yours,

LESLIE COMBS.

[Inclosure 4.—Translation.]
Mr. Ton to Mr. Combs.

GUATEMALA, June 17, 1903. HONORED Sır: Referring to the note I had the honor to address to your excellency on the 15th instant, I now have the pleasure of making known to you that the fine illegally imposed upon me by the judge of Amatitlan and of which I complained on the 11th ultimo has been returned to me.

I have the pleasure of once more repeating to you my most heartfelt thanks for the happy termination of the affair, and repeat, etc. At the request of Juan Ton,

Carlos Lon.

Mr. Loomis to Mr. Combs.

No. 51.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, July 3, 1903. Sir: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your No. 74, of the 19th ultimo, transmitting the correspondence in the case of Juan Ton, a Chinese, arrested at Amatitlan and illegally imprisoned and fined.

The Department approves your course in pressing all meritorious cases of outrage upon the Chinese to a proper settlement.

Copies of your dispatch and of its inclosures have been sent to the Chinese minister for his information. I am, etc.,

FRANCIS B. LOOMIS,

Acting Secretary of State.

Mr. Hay to Mr. Combs. No. 57.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, July 14, 1903. Sir: I inclose herewith copy of a note from the Chinese minister at this capital, expressing his sincere appreciation of the good offices

FR 1903— 37

exerted by yod on behalf of certain Chinese subjects in Guatemala, and expressing also the hope that the continuance of those good offices will prevent further imposition upon Chinese subjects. I am, etc.,

JOHN HAY.

[Inclosure.)
Sir Chentung Liang Cheng to Mr. Loomis.

CHINESE LEGATION,

Washington, July 6, 1903. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note, No. 18, of the 3d instant, with which you transmit for my information copies of a dispatch and its inclosures from the United States minister at Guatemala City, relating to the case of Juan Ton, a Chinese subject, arrested at Amatitlan and illegally imprisoned and fined, but subsequently released at the minister's request and the fine refunded.

In reply I wish to thank you for your kind courtesy in communicating the information to me, and to ask that you will kindly convey to Minister Counbs my sincere appreciation of the good offices exerted by him in the case above mentioned and the other cases referred to in his dispatch. I am sure that the friendly protection extended by him to the Chinese residing in Guatemala can not fail to be appreciated by them with feelings of deep and sincere gratitude. I will take occasion to report to my Government for its information the kind efforts exerted by Minister Combs in behalf of the said Chinese subjects. I trust that the continued exercise of his good offices will prevent further impositions upon the Chinese. Accept, etc.,

CHENTUNG LIANG CHENG.

REVOLUTION IN HONDURAS, AND RECOGNITION OF NEW

GOVERNMENT.

Mr. Combs to Mr. Hay.

No. 36.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

GUATEMALA AND HONDURAS,

Guatemala, March 18, 1903. Sir: I have the honor to attach copy of a report received from W. Heyden, United States consular agent at Amapala, for the information of the Department.

President Estrada informed me a few days since his information was that Bonilla was making a successful struggle; that Bonilla's forces were drawing closer and closer to Tegucigalpa both from the east and from the west. I have, etc.,

LESLIE COMBS.

[Inclosure.)

Mr. Heyden to Mr. Combs.

UNITED STATES CONSULAR AGENCY,

Amapala, Honduras, March 7, 1903. Sır: The communication between this port and Tegucigalpa is still interrupted and I therefore have the honor to inform you about the political situation of this country.

A great part of the members of the Congress that was in session in Tegucigalpa, amongst them the President of the Congress, fled from the capital to the frontier of Salyador the 30th of January, so that Congress was de facto dissolved on that date. It seems that the council of ministers formed a new Congress out of the remaining deputies and the substitutes of the fugitives. The new Congress proclaimed Dr. Juan Angel Arias president, and Gen. Maximo B. Rosales vice-president of the Republic. The new Government was recognized by Nicaragua, but I do not know if it was recognized by the other Central American Republics.

In the meantime General Bonilla has gone ahead with his military operations against the new government. His forces have taken the fortified towns of Ocotepeque, Santa Rosa, and Gracias, near the frontier of Nicaragua.

On the 22d of February General Bonilla was attacked in El Aceituno by General Sierra, the ex-president, who was completely defeated and escaped with several hundred men, the remainder of his troops, to the fortified town of Nacaome, where he still is. General Bonilla has now an army of about 4,500 men. * * I have, etc.,

W. HEYDEN, United States Consular Agent.

Mr. Combs to Mr. Hay.
[Telegram.--Paraphrase.]
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Guatemala, April 15, 1903. (Mr. Combs reports that General Bonilla announces the surrender to his forces of Tegucigalpa, and claims that normal conditions are restored in Honduras.)

Mr. Combs to Mr. Ilay.

[Telegram.-Paraphrase.]
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Guatemala, April 24, 1903. (Mr. Combs reports that Mr. Ordoñez, minister for foreign affairs of Honduras, requests him to inform the Government of the United States that peace has been thoroughly reestablished and that ex-President Arias is a prisoner.

Mr. Combs thinks it advisable to recognize General Bonilla as President of Honduras and to present his letter of credence.

Requests instructions.)

Mr. Loomis to Mr. Combs.

[Telegram.- Paraphrase.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 24, 1903. (Mr. Loomis authorizes Mr. Combs to recognize General Bonilla as the President of Honduras without precipitation if he is effectively administering the Government and is in position to fulfill international obligations.)

Mr. Combs to Mr. May. No. 82.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

GUATEMALA AND HONDURAS,

Guatemala, July 10, 1903. Sir: I have the honor to transmit berewith inclosed two sealed envelopes from the President of Honduras addressed to the President of the United States of America in acknowledgment of the receipt of the recall of my distinguished predecessor and my appointment to the charge of envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary near his Government.

Copies of the notes of the minister of foreign affairs of Honduras transmitting the above inclosures are hereto attached. I have, etc.,

LESLIE COMBS.

[Inclosure 1.-Translation.]

Mr. Vasquez to Mr. Combs.

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS,

REPUBLIC OF HONDURAS,

Tegucigalpa, June 18, 1903. Mr. MINISTER: I have the honor to transmit to your excellency the original, accompanied by the style copy, of an autograph letter, in which the President of the Republic of Honduras acknowledges to the President of the United States of America the receipt of an autograph letter, through which the latter communicates the retirement of the Hon. W. Godfrey Hunter from his charge as envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States of America near this Government.

I request your excellency to transmit the inclosed communication to its high destination, and have the honor, etc.,

MARIANO VASQUEZ.

[Inclosure 2.-Translation.]

Mr. Vasquez to Mr. Combs.

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS,

REPUBLIC OF HONDURAS,

Tegucigalpa, June 18, 1908. MR. MINISTER: I have the honor to refer to your excellency's esteemed communication, dated the 21st ultimo, in which you were pleased to inclose two autograph letters, by which the most excellent President of the United States of America made known to the President of this Republic that, owing to the resignation of the Hon. W. Godfrey Hunter, he had been relieved of the high charge he occupied as envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States of America, and that you had been appointed to fill said charge near the Government of Honduras.

Upon informing your excellency that the documents referred to have been transmitted to their high destination, I beg you in like manner to treat the reply, accompanied by the usual style copy, which the President of this Republic addresses to his excellency, the President of the United States of America.

In the same communication to which I have the honor of replying, your excellency disclosed your intention of visiting this capital, and concerning this the President of the Republic instructs me to say to your excellency that it will be highly gratifying to him to receive you and express to you the sentiments of esteem which the Government of this Republic entertains for the people and Government of the l’nited States.

Congratulating your excellency on the merited confidence you have received from your Government, I subscribe, etc.,

MARIANO V'ASQUEZ.

ARREST FOR REFUSAL TO PAY A “FORCED WAR LOAN," AND SUBSEQUENT RELEASE OF ALBERTO POSADAS, A NATURALIZED CITIZEN OF THE UNITED STATES.

Mr. Combs to Mr. Ilay.

[Telegram.—Paraphrase.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Guatemala, March 23, 1903. (Mr. Combs reports that the Government of Guatemala, in maintaining its constitution, refuses to recognize the American citizenship of Alberto Posadas, a native-born Guatemalan returning bearing a United States passport, and that the naturalized citizen referred to is under detention for refusal to pay a forced loan.

Mr. Combs requests instructions.)

Mr. Loomis to Mr. Combs.

[Telegram.--Paraphrase.]

Mr. Combs to protrefusing to refined in the

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, March 24, 1903. (Mr. Loomis instructs Mr. Combs to protest against the unfriendly action of the Guatemalan Government in refusing to recognize the American citizenship of Posadas, who was duly naturalized in the United States after a residence of twelve years, and to ask for Posadas' release.)

Mr. Combs to Mr. Ilay.

No. 40.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

GUATEMALA AND HONDURAS,

Guatemala, March 25, 1903. SIR: I have the honor to report the receipt of a letter March 21 from Mr. Alberto Posadas complaining of an effort to enforce a war loan from him and of the restrictions placed upon his movements by the jefe politico of his district. (Copy of letter hereto attached, marked No. i.)

I called upon the minister of foreign affairs the same afternoon and had a discussion of an hour's duration with him. He took the ground that many Guatemalans went to the United States for a few years to obtain naturalization papers to avoid the duties and obligations of citizens, then returned to Guatemala where all their property interests lie; that the constitution of the country declared all persons born in Guatemala subjects and citizens of Guatemala whenever they were in this country, no difference in what or how many other countries they had obtained citizenship. I stated we did not bestow citizenship in the United States lightly and only when it was thought it was sought in good faith; that if anyone in Guatemala, was bearing a passport not

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