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junta of the provisional government of Panama for delivery of the original.

Entire confidence is entertained that the mission intrusted to you will be conducted in a manner acceptable to both Governments and conducive to the interests of both countries. I am, etc.,

FRANCIS B. LOOMIS,

Acting Secretary.

Mr. Buchanan to Mr. Hay.

No. 4.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

(Special Mission) Panama, December 25, 1903. SIR: I have the honor to advise you of my arrival at Colon on the morning of the 22d. I was met there by Dr. Gonzales Guill, subsecretary for foreign affairs, and Dr. Juan Mendez, private secretary to the junta. A private car was placed at my disposal and every possible courtesy shown me.

I reached Panama at noon and was met at the station by the minister for foreign affairs, and by him escorted to the hotel.

I transmitted the office copy of my credentials to the minister for foreign affairs with a note, a copy of which I inclose, dated the 23d, and handed to the minister early on the morning of the 24th, together with a second note containing a confidential copy of the remarks I proposed to make upon presenting my letter to the junta. A copy of this note, together with its inclosure, will be found herein.

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I was notified by the minister for foreign affairs on the 24th that I would be received by the junta to-day at 3 p. m. At that hour I was conducted to the Government house, our carriage passing through two short streets which were lined on both sides with infantry. At the Government house I was awaited by the junta, the cabinet, the supreme court, and all the military officers of high rank in the Republic. My reception was marked by dignity and modest good taste shown by the Government. A military band played the Star Spangled Banner as I entered and when I retired from the Government house.

In response to my remarks, Doctor Arango, for the junta, read a reply; a copy and translation you will find herewith.

The entire consular corps was present at the reception, with the exception of the Central American consuls and those from Chile and the Argentine.

My reception to-day was in every way marked by a dignified, grateful respect and regard for our country, and was therefore very gratifying to me. I have, etc.,

Wm. I. BUCHANAN.

(Inclosure 1.)
Mr. Buchanan to the minister for foreign affairs.

Panama, December 25, 1903. Sir: I have the honor to advise your excellency of my designation by the President as envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States of America on special mission to your excellency's Government, and to inclose here

with an office copy of the letter I bear from the President accrediting me in such capacity.

I beg to request your excellency to be good enough to designate a time at which I may have the honor to present the original to their excellencies the members of the junta of the provisional Government of the Republic of Panama. I have, etc.,

Wm. I. BUCHANAN.

[Inclosure 2.)
Mr. Buchanan to the minister for foreign affairs.

PANAMA, December 23, 1903. Sir: I beg to inclose for your excellency's information a copy of the remarks I shall have the honor to make to their excellencies the members of the junta of the provisional government upon the occasion of my presenting to their excellencies my letter of credence from the President of the United States. I have, etc

WM. I. BUCHANAN.

[Subinclosure.] Mr. Buchanan's remarks upon presenting his credentials. I have the honor to present to your excellencies the letter of credence I bear from the President of the United States of America accrediting me as an envoy on special mission to your excellencies' Government.

I am deeply sensible of the honor thus conferred upon me by the President and profoundly grateful for the opportunity I am thus afforded to meet your excellencies' people and to study the conditions and possibilities of the Republic of Panama.

The advent and the future development and life of this new nation is a subject of keen and kindly interest to the American people, who all wish for your excellencies' people and country that wide progress and advancement which peace, quiet, and economy bring to all countries.

I am charged by the President to express to your excellencies his fervent wish that these benefits shall come to the Republic of Panama, and that happiness, contentment, and prosperity may abide with your excellencies' people.

[Inclosure 3.—Translation.] Reply of Doctor Arango, on behalf of the junta, to Mr. Buchanan's remarks. Sir: The junta of the provisional government of the Republic of Panama receives from your hands with lively satisfaction the letter of His Excellency the President of the United States of America which accredits you before this new nation as envoy especial of your Government. By this the greatest of the Republics of the continent dignifies its appreciation of the least as an equal with her sister Republics and gives a manifest proof of the high spirit of justice which animates the great people of the North, in whose favor our people extend their best wishes and their best intentions.

The junta of the provisional government of the Republic of Panama considers the selection by the United States Government of one who, like yourself, unites in himself such marked personal and public qualities as to enable him to duly appreciate the actual conditions of our country as a high mark of deference. Your presence in our midst will be the means, if that be possible, of more closely linking the two nations together in sincere friendship and accord.

Notwithstanding we know that the people of your country are interested in the existence and development of this nation, it has been especially grateful to this junta to hear the fact repeated by the official representative of a people so great, free, and generous. We pray the Almighty that what you have said, the benefits of progress, the advancements from peace and the emoluments of order, the harvest the people of Panama aspire to, might be, if it were possible, as bright as that gathered by your country with marked advantage for humanity.

You can assure His Excellency the President of your nation that the Government and people of Panama thank him for his good wishes for this Republic, and that we in return fervently hope that all good may come to his people and to himself.

PERSIA.

PROTECTION OF AMERICAN INTERESTS BY BRITISH CONSUL

GENERAL AT TABRIZ.

Mr. Tyler to Mr. Hay.
No. 28, Diplomatic series.] LEGATION OF THE L'NITED STATES,

Teheran, January 21, 1903. Sir: I have the honor to transmit inclosed a copy of resolutions drawn up by the members of the American West Persian Mission expressing their cordial and grateful appreciation of the services Mr. Cecil G. Wood, the British consul-general at Tabriz, Persia, bas, during the time he has held the appointment in that city, rendered to the mission. Having had considerable correspondence with Mr. Wood for the whole of the period he has been in Tabriz, I have had opportunities of knowing his thoughtful attention to and willing cooperation with the missionaries in all that affects their safety and welfare, and therefore beg most respectfully to inclose the expressions contained in these resolutions. I have, etc.,

John TYLER,
Vice-Consul-General in Charge.

[Inclosure.] RESOLUTIONS.

Whereas Mr. Cecil G. Wood, His British Majesty's consul-general, has taken leave of absence with the expectation of not returning to Tabriz:

Resolved, That we missionaries, citizens of the United States of America, place on record our appreciation of and thanks for the assistance and protection Mr. Wood, as consul-general, has always cordially extended to us.

Resolved, That we express our regret at the thought of Mr. and Mrs. Wood leaving Tabriz, and we assure them that our best wishes will follow them wherever they may be assigned.

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the legation of the United States of America and to our mission board.

S. G. WILSON ET AL.

Mr. Ilay to Mr. Tyler. No. 17.]

DEPARTMENT OF State,

Washington, February 18, 1903. Sır: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatch No. 28, diplomatic series, dated the 21st ultimo, inclosing a copy of resolutions drawn up by the members of the American West Persian Mission expressing their cordial and grateful appreciation of the services rendered by Mr. Cecil G. Wood, the British consul-general at Tabriz, Persia, to the mission during his official residence in that city.

The Department cordially appreciates Mr. Wood's kindly services to American citizens. I am, etc.,

JOHN Hay.

RESTRICTIONS ON TRAVEL IN PERSIA.

Mr. Tyler to Mr. Ilay.
No. 29, Diplomatic series.] LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Teheran, March 4, 1903. SIR: I have the honor to transmit inclosed a copy and translation of a note received from the minister for foreign affairs relating to sketching and photographing by travelers and tourists in Persia.

In view of the great increase in this practice by people, quite ignorant of the restrictions and customs prevailing about dwelling houses and religious buildings, traveling in different parts of Persia, some such precautions as those proposed in the note may be the means of preventing insults or even greater indignities.

I am sending copies of the note to the different American missions in Persia for the information of the members and others. I have, etc.,

JOHN TYLER,
Vice-Consul-General in Charge.

[Inclosure.—Translation.]

Minister for foreign affairs to Mr. Tyler.

MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS, American Department, Zeekadah 28, 1320 ( February 28, 1903). Sir: In view of reports which have come to the notice of His Imperial Majesty the Shah, it appears that on some occasions certain persons, subjects of foreign states, on the plea of traveling or touring in different parts of Persia, are in the habit of making sketches or taking photographs of places, which have been the cause of suspicion on the part of some people. It is possible, if this be allowed to continue, that trouble and difficulty will arise. I beg, therefore, in conformity with the royal commands, to request that whenever a traveler or tourist, under the protection of your respected Government, desires to visit any part of Persia, notice of his arrival and intention may first be communicated to the ministry for foreign affairs, in order that proper instructions may be issued so as to prevent trouble and opposition. I take, etc.,

SEAL OF THE MUSHIR-ED-DOWLAH,

Minister for Foreign Affairs.

PERU.

LAW GOVERNING MARRIAGES BETWEEN NON-CATHOLICS.

Mr. Neill to Mr. Hay.

No. 822.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Lima, November 26, 1903. SIR: Referring to the communications sent from this legation regarding marriages between non-Catholics in Peru, I have the honor to transmit for your information copies of a recent law on this question.

It appears, according to article 71 of the constitution (mentioned in this new law): “If the Executive does not order the law so passed to be promulgated and complied with, nor make its observations within ten days, according to the terms of article 69, the promulgation shall be made by the president of Congress, and he shall order it to be inserted for its execution in some newspaper."

This new law is as follows: In order to come within the precepts of the law of December 23, 1897, it will be sufficient for the mayor to authorize the marriage, that either of the contracting parties should declare that he or she never belonged to the Catholic community, or that he or she has separated himself or herself from it.

The decree of October 25, 1903, was not opportunely promulgated by the Executive, and in virtue of the said article 71 of the constitution, Señor Nicanor Alvarez Calderón, president of Congress, ordered it to be printed, circulated, and communicated to the bureau of justice, worship, and instruction, in order that the necessary steps be taken for its observation. This on the 23d of November, 1903. I have, etc.,

RICHARD R. NEILL.

[Inclosure.—Translation)

Non-Catholic marriages.

NICAROR ALVAREZ CALDERÓN,

President of Congress:
Whereas Congress has dictated the following law:

Sole article: In order to come within the precepts of the law of December 23, 1897, it will be sufficient for the mayor to authorize the marriage, that either of the contracting parties should declare that he or she never belonged to the Catholic community, or that he or she has separated himself or herself from it.

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