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The trial of the officers who took part in the conspiracy against the murderers of King Alexander resulted in light sentences being imposed—the longest being two years. Doctor Velikovitch, a former physician, and Captain Lontkyevitch, a former aid-de-camp of the late King, were sentenced to one month each, and other sentences were given varying from three months to one year.

The British minister will probably present his credentials to King Peter very shortly, as he was waiting only until a new ministry should come into power, and the Dutch minister resident (who is also accredited to Roumania) told me to-day that he expected to present his letters of credence early in January, upon his return from leave of absence, so that, with the exception of the United States, all the countries which were represented at Belgrade under King Alexander, will have accredited the same ministers to his successor. I have, etc.,

CHARLES S. WILSON, Chargé d'Affaires ad interim.

Mr. Wilson to Mr. Hay.

No. 27, Servian series.] LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Bucharest, October 15, 1903. Sir: Referring to my dispatch No. 26, this series, I have the honor to report that the officers who were arrested for conspiracy against the murderers of the late King and Queen appealed to the military court, by which the sentences on four of the officers have been increased from ten to thirteen months' imprisonment, with loss of their commissions. The sentences of the others are confirmed, with the exception of two, who received sentences of one month's imprisonment and who have now been set at ļiberty. I have, etc.,

CHARLES S. Wilson.

SPAIN.

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND SPAIN. FRIEND

SHIP AND GENERAL RELATIONS.

Signed at Madrid, July 3, 1902.
Ratification advised by the Senate, December 16, 1902.
Ratified by the President, February 6, 1903.
Ratified by Spain, March 30, 1903.
Ratifications exchanged at Madrid, April 14, 1903.
Proclaimed, April 20, 1903.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas a Treaty of Friendship and General Relations between the United States of America and the Kingdom of Spain was concluded and signed by their respective Plenipotentiaries at Madrid, on the third day of July, one thousand nine hundred and two, the original of which Treaty, being in the English and Spanish languages is word for word as follows:

Treaty of friendship and general relations between the United States of

America and Spain.

The United States of America and His Catholic Majesty the King of Spain, desiring to consolidate on a permanent basis the friendship and good correspondence which happily prevail between the two Parties, have determined to sign a Treaty of Friendship and General Relations, the stipulations whereof may be productive of mutual advantage and reciprocal utility to both Nations, and have named with this intention:

The President of the United States of America, Bellamy Storer, a citizen of the United States, and their Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to His Catholic Majesty; And His Catholic Majesty the King of Spain, Don Juan Manuel Sanchez y Gutierrez de Castro, Duke of Almodóvar del Rio, Marquis of Puebla de los Infantes, Grandee of Spain, His Most Catholic Majesty's Chamberlain, Knight Professed of the Order of Alcántara, Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Order of Ysabela the Catholic, of the Legion of Honor, of the Red Eagle of Prussia, etc., etc., etc., His Minister of Sta

Who having communicated to each other their Full Powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

There shall be a firm and inviolable peace and sincere friendship between the United States and its citizens on the one part, and His

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Catholic Majesty and the Spanish Nation on the other part, without exception of persons or places under their respective dominion.

ARTICLE II. There shall be a full, entire and reciprocal liberty of commerce and navigation between the citizens and subjects of the two High Contracting Parties, who shall have reciprocally the right, on conforming to the laws of the country, to enter, travel and reside in all parts of their respective territories, saving always the right of expulsion which each Government reserves to itself, and they shall enjoy in this respect, for the protection of their persons and their property, the same treatment and the same rights as the citizens or subjects of the country or the citizens or subjects of the most favored Nation.

They can freely exercise their industry or their business, as well wholesale as retail, without being subjected as to their persons or their property, to any taxes, general or local, imposts or conditions whatsoever, other or more onerous than those which are imposed or may be imposed upon the citizens or subjects of the country or the citizens or subjects of the most favored Nation.

It is, however, understood that these provisions are not intended to annul or prevent, or constitute any exception from the laws, ordinances and special regulations respecting taxation, commerce, health, police, and public security, in force or hereafter made in the respective countries and applying to foreigners in general.

ARTICLE INI.

Where, on the death of any person holding real property (or property not personal), within the territories of one of the Contracting Parties, such real property would, by the laws of the land, pass to a citizen or subject of the other, were he not disqualified by the laws of the country where such real property is situated, such citizen or subject shall be allowed a term of three years in which to sell the same, this term to be reasonably prolonged if circumstances render it necessary, and to withdraw the proceeds thereof, without restraint or interference, and exempt from any succession, probate or administrative duties or charges other than those which may be imposed in like cases upon the citizens or subjects of the country from which such proceeds may be drawn.

The citizens or subjects of each of the Contracting Parties shall have full power to dispose of their personal property within the territories of the other, by testament, donation, or otherwise; and their heirs, legatees, and donees, being citizens or subjects of the other Contracting Party, whether resident or nonresident, shall succeed to their said personal property, and may take possession thereof either by themselves or by others acting for them, and dispose of the same at their pleasure, paying such duties only as the citizens or subjects of the country where the property lies, shall be liable to pay in like cases.

In the event that the United States should grant to the citizens or subjects of a third Power the right to possess and preserve real estate in all the States, territories and dominions of the Union, Spanish subjects shall enjoy the same rights; and, in that case only, reciprocally, the citizens of the United States shall also enjoy the same rights in Spanish Dominions.

ARTICLE IV.

The citizens or subjects of each of the two High Contracting Parties shall enjoy in the territories of the other the right to exercise their worship, and also the right to bury their respective countrymen according to their religious customs in such suitable and convenient places as may be established and maintained for that purpose, subject to the Constitution, Laws and Regulations of the respective countries.

ARTICLE V.

The citizens or subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties shall be exempt in the territories of the other from all compulsory military service, by land or sea, and from all pecuniary contributions in lieu of such, as well as from all obligatory official functions. whatsoever.

Furthermore, their vessels or effects shall not be liable to any seizure or detention for any public use without a sufficient compensation, which, if practicable, shall be agreed upon in advance.

ARTICLE VI.

The citizens or subjects of each of the two High Contracting Parties shall have free access to the Courts of the other, on conforming to the laws regulating the matter, as well for the prosecution as for the defense of their rights, in all the degrees of jurisdiction established by law. They can be represented by lawyers, and they shall enjoy, in this respect and in what concerns arrest of persons, seizure of property and domiciliary visits to their houses, manufactories, stores, warehouses, etc., the same rights and the same advantages which are or shall be granted to the citizens or subjects of the most favored Nation.

ARTICLE VII.

No higher or other duties of tonnage, pilotage, loading, unloading, lighthouse, quarantine or other similar or corresponding duties whatsoever, levied in the name or for the profit of the Government, public functionaries, private individuals, corporations or establishments of any kind shall be imposed in the ports of the territories of either country than those imposed in the like cases on national vessels in general or vessels of the most favored Nation. Such equality of treatment shall apply, reciprocally, to the respective vessels from whatever port or place they may arrive and whatever may be their place of destination, except as hereinafter provided in Article IX of this Convention.

ARTICLE VIII.

All the articles which are or may be legally imported from foreign countries into ports of the l'nited States, in United States' vessels, may likewise be imported into those ports in Spanish vessels, without being liable to any other or higher duties or charges whatsoever than if such articles were imported in United States vessels; and, reciprocally, all articles which are or may be legally imported from foreign countries into the ports of Spain, in Spanish vessels, may likewise be

imported into these ports in United States vessels without being liable to any other or higher duties or charges whatsoever than if such were imported from foreign countries in Spanish vessels.

In the same manner there shall be perfect equality of treatment in regard to exportation to foreign countries, so that the same export duties shall be paid and the same bounties and drawbacks allowed in the territories of either of the High Contracting Parties on the exportation to foreign countries of any article which is or may be legally exported from the said territories, whether such exportation shall take place in United States or in Spanish vessels, and whatever may be the place of destination, whether a port of either of the Contracting Parties or of any third Power.

It is, however, understood that neither this article nor any other of the articles of the present Convention shall in any way affect the special treaty stipulations which exist or may hereafter exist with regard to the commercial relations between Spain and the Philippine Islands.

ARTICLE IX.

The coasting trade of both the High Contracting Parties is excepted from the provisions of the present Treaty, and shall be regulated according to the Laws, Ordinances and Regulations of the United States and Spain respectively.

Vessels of either country shall be permitted to discharge part of their cargoes at any port open to foreign commerce in the territory of either of the High Contracting Parties, and to proceed with the remainder of their cargo to any other port or ports of the same territory open to foreign commerce, without paying other or higher tonnage dues or port charges in such cases than would be paid by national vessels in like circumstances and they shall be permitted to load in like manner at different ports in the same voyage outward.

ARTICLE X.

In cases of shipwreck, damages at sea, or forced putting in, each party shall afford to the vessels of the other, whether belonging to the State or to individuals, the same assistance and protection and the same immunities which would have been granted to its own vessels in similar cases.

ARTICLE XI.

All vessels sailing under the flag of the United States, and furnished with such papers as their laws require, shall be regarded in Spain as United States vessels, and reciprocally, all vessels sailing under the flag of Spain and furnished with the papers which the laws of Spain require, shall be regarded in the United States as Spanish vessels.

ARTICLE XII.

The High Contracting Parties desiring to avoid all inequality in their public communications and official intercourse agree to grant to the Envoys, Ambassadors, Ministers, Chargés d'affaires and other diplomatic agents of each other, the same favors, privileges, immunities and exemptions which are granted or shall be granted to the

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