Addresses and Presidential Messages of Theodore Roosevelt, 1902-1904

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Page 153 - An act to promote the safety of employees and travelers upon railroads by compelling common carriers engaged in interstate commerce to equip their cars with automatic couplers and continuous brakes and their locomotives with driving-wheel brakes, and for other purposes.
Page 225 - Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord? or who shall stand in his holy place? He that hath clean hands, and a pure heart; who hath not lifted up his soul unto vanity, nor swom deceitfully.
Page 427 - An act to provide for the construction of a canal connecting the waters of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans,
Page 356 - Every man must be guaranteed his liberty and his right to do as he likes with his property or his labor, so long as he does not infringe upon the rights of others.
Page 322 - States. .. .The Monroe Doctrine is a declaration that there must be no territorial aggrandizement by any non-American power at the expense of any American power on American soil. It is in no wise intended as hostile to any nation in the 0ld World.
Page 425 - The Republic of Panama further grants to the United States in perpetuity the use, occupation, and control...
Page 292 - ... has meant a startling increase, not merely in the aggregate of wealth, but in the number of very large individual, and especially of very large corporate, fortunes. The creation of these great corporate fortunes has not been due to the tariff nor to any other governmental action, but to natural causes in the business world, operating in other countries as they operate in our own.
Page 118 - We do not guarantee any state against punishment if it misconducts itself, provided that punishment does not take the form of the acquisition of territory by any non-American power.
Page 118 - In other words, the Monroe Doctrine is a declaration that there must be no territorial aggrandizement by any nonAmerican power at the expense of any American power on American soil.
Page 328 - The American people must either build and maintain an adequate navy or else make up their minds definitely to accept a secondary position in international affairs, not merely in political but in commercial matters. It has been well said that there is no surer way of courting national disaster than to be "opulent, aggressive, and unarmed.

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