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1. George Washington..F | Apl. 30, 1789–Mar. 4, 1797 Dec. 14, 1799 John Adams.

(Two terms.) 2. John Adams... .F Mar. 4, 1797-Mar. 4, 1801 July 4, 1826 Thos. Jefferson.

(One term.) 3. Thomas Jefferson...D Mar. 4, 1801-Mar. 4, 1809 July 4, 1826 Aaron Burr.

(Two terms.)

Sept. 14, 1836 George Clinton.

April 20, 1812 4. James Madison .....D Mar. 4, 1809-Mar. 4, 1817 June 28, 1836 George Clinton.

(Two terms.) Elbridge Gerry.

Nov. 23, 1814 5. James Monroe......D Mar. 4, 1817-Mar. 4, 1825 July 4, 1831 Daniel D. Tompkins.

(Two terms.)

June 11, 1825 6. John Quincy Adams. W Mar. 4, 1825-Mar. 4, 1829 Feb. 23, 1848 John C. Calhoun.

(One term.)

Mar. 31, 1850 7. Andrew Jackson....D Mar. 4, 1829-Mar. 4, 1837 June 8, 1845 John C. Calhoun.

(Two terms.) Martin Van Buren.

8. Martin Van Buren ..D Mar. 4, 1837-Mar. 4, 1841 July 24, 1862 Richard M. Jobnson.

Nov. 19, 1850 9. Wm. H. Harrison..W Mar. 4, 1841-Apl. 4, 1841 Apl. 4, 1841 John Tyler.

(One term.)

(One month.)

* The names of the Vice-Presidents are given in smaller type under those of Presidents. When two names occur, the first stands for the first term, the other for the second. F means Federal;. W, Whig; D, Democratic; R, Republican.

PRESIDENTS AND VICE-PRESIDENTS—CONTINUED 317

NAMES AND PARTY.

BEGINNING AND END OF

TERM OF OFFICE

DATE OF
DEATH.

-, 1853

10. John Tyler.........W Apl. 4, 1841-Mar. 4, 1845 Jan. 18, 1862

(Three years and 11 months.) II. James K. Polk......D Mar. 4, 1845-Mar. 4, 1849 June 15, 1849 George M. Dallas.

(One term.)

Dec. 31, 1864 12. Zachary Taylor ....W Mar. 4, 1849-July 9, 1850 July 9, 1850

Millard Fillmore. (One year, 4 mos. and 5 days.) 13. Millard Fillmore...W July 9, 1850-Mar. 4, 1853

Mar. 8, 1874 (Two yrs., 7 mos. and 23 days.) 14. Franklin Pierce.....D Mar. 4, 1853-Mar. 4, 1857

Oct. 8, 1869 William R. King.

(One term.)

Apl. 15. James Buchanan....D Mar. 4, 1857-Mar. 4, 1861 June 1, 1868 John C. Breckenridge.

(One term.)

May 17, 1875 16. Abraham Lincoln...R Mar. 4, 1861-Apl. 15, 1865 Apl. 15, 1865

Hannibal Hamlin. (One term, i mo. and 11 days.) July 4, 1891

Andrew Johnson. 17. Andrew Johnson.... R Apl. 15, 1865-Mar. 4, 1869 July 31, 1875

(Three yrs., 10 mos. and 17 dys.) 18. Ulysses S. Grant....R Mar. 4, 1869-Mar. 4, 1877 July 23, 1885 Schuyler Colfax.

(Two terms.)

Jan. 13, 1885 Henry Wilson.

Nov. 22, 1875 19. Rutherford B. Hayes.R Mar, 4, 1877-Mar. 4, 1881 Jan. 17, 1893 William A. Wheeler.

(One term.)

June 4, 1887 20. James A. Garfield...R Mar. 4, 1881-Sept. 19, 1881 Sept. 19, 1881 Chester A. Arthur.

(6 months and 15 days.) 21. Chester A. Arthur...R Sept. 19, 1881-Mar. 4, 1885 Nov. 18, 1886

(Three yrs., 5 mos. and 13 dys.) 22. Grover Cleveland. .D Mar. 4, 1885-Mar. 4, 1889 Thos. A. Hendricks.

(One term.)

Nov. 25, 1885 23. Benjamin Harrison..R Mar. 4, 1889-Mar. 4, 1893 Mar. 13, 1901 Levi P. Morton.

(One term.) 24. Grover Cleveland...D Mar. 4, 1893-Mar. 4, 1897 Adlai E. Stevenson.

(One term.) 25. William McKinley ..R Mar. 4, 1897-Sept. 14, 1901 Sept. 14, 1901 ON THE LIFE OF ANDREW JACKSON

Garret A. Hobart. (One term, 6 mos. and 11 days.) Nov. 21, 1899.
Theodore Roosevelt.

26. Theodore Roosevelt..R Sept. 14, 1901

On January 30, 1835, President Jackson had attended the funeral ceremonies over the body of Warren R. Davis, Member of Congress from South Carolina, in the hall of the House of Representatives, and was passing through the great rotunda to the exit when a man stepped forth from the crowd and pointed a pistol at the President's breast, pulling the trigger. The cap exploded, but without igniting the charge. The assailant then produced a second pistol, which acted, however, like the first. Levi Woodbury, the Secretary of the Treasury, who was walking with General Jackson, seized the man, and with the aid of others overpowered him.

The would-be murderer was immediately turned over to the marshal of the District, and was taken before Chief Justice Cranch, who at once held an examination. The prisoner, one Richard Lawrence, a workman, declined to make any explanation of his action.

"Old Hickory" was inclined to believe that his political enemies, of which he had many, had plotted to take his life, but it soon became apparent that Lawrence had no accomplices, and, indeed, that he was insane.

He believed himself to be the King of Great Britain and of this country also, wrongfully deprived of his rights. His trial, which took place on April ith, 1835, lasted one single day. The jury, in five minutes, returned a verdict of not guilty, basing it on the ground that Lawrence was insane.

Had the assassin succeeded, he would undoubtedly have suffered the penalty of his crime.

FAMOUS IN MODERN HISTORY

Paul, Czar of Russia, killed by Russian nobles on

March 24, 1801. Napoleon I., Emperor of France, on Dec. 24, 1800,

attempt by means of an infernal machine. Andrew Jackson, President of the United States,

attempt on January 30, 1835. Napoleon III., Emperor of France, three attempts,

the last by Orsini, on Jan. 14, 1858. Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, shot

by John Wilkes Booth, on April 14, 1865. Prince Bismarck, attempt by Blind on May 7, 1866,

and by Kullmann, on July 13, 1874. William I., King of Prussia and Emperor of Germany,

attempts by Becker, on July 14, 1861; by Hoedel,

on May II, 1878; by Nobiling, on June 2, 1878. Abdul Azij, Sultan of Turkey, killed by Turkish offi

cers, on June 4, 1876. Alexander II., Czar of Russia, after five unsuccessful

attempts, killed by means of a bomb, on March

13, 1881.

James A. Garfield, President of the United States, shot

by Charles J. Guiteau, on July 2, 1881. Marie Francois Carnot, President of France, killed on

June 24, 1894, by an anarchist, Cesare Santo. Humbert, King of Italy, killed on July 29, 1900, by

Bresci. William McKinley, President of the United States,

shot at Buffalo, by Czolgosz, on Sept. 6, 1901.

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