Chancellorsville: Lee's Greatest Battle

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Stackpole Books, 1988 - 398 pages
Originally published in 1958, this Stackpole classic retains its popular appeal and easy readability. Now updated with commentary and notes by D. Scott Hartwig, it will be of special interest to Civil War buffs and historians. Exceptional maps and illustrations.

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Contents

A NEW GENERAL TAKES COMMAND
1
HOOKER REBUILDS HIS ARMY
13
PRELIMINARY CAVALRY ENGAGEMENTS
37
THE ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
62
THE STRATEGY OF THE CAMPAIGN
85
HOOKERS PLAN UNFOLDS
103
THE JUGGERNAUT ROLLS SWIFTLY
116
HOOKER BEGINS TO SLIP
136
JACKSONS HISTORIC FLANK MARCH
203
THE STORM BREAKS
230
JACKSONS LAST BATTLE
255
THE SITUATION AT 5 AM MAY 3
276
SAVAGE FIGHTING AT CLOSE QUARTERS
287
THE SIXTH CORPS AT FREDERICKSBURG
306
THE BATTLE OF SALEM CHURCH
329
AN EVALUATION OF THE CAMPAIGN
359

WEIGHED IN THE BALANCE
162
THE ARMIES MEET HEAD ON
173

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Page 7 - You are ambitious, which, within reasonable bounds, does good rather than harm ; but I think that during General Burnside's command of the army you have taken counsel of your ambition and thwarted him as much as you could, in which you did a great wrong to the country, and to a most meritorious and honorable brother officer.
Page 7 - I have heard, in such a way as to believe it, of your recently saying, that both the army and the government needed a dictator. Of course it was not for this, but in spite of it, that I have; given you the command. Only those generals who gain successes can set up dictators. What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship.
Page 274 - I have just received your note, informing me that you were wounded. I cannot express my regret at the occurrence. Could I have directed events, I should have chosen, for the good of the country, to have been disabled in your stead. I congratulate you upon the victory which is due to your skill and energy.
Page 7 - Burnside's command of the army, you have taken counsel of your ambition, and thwarted him as much as you could, in which you did a great wrong to the country, and to a most meritorious and honorable brother officer. I have heard, in such a way as to believe it, of your recently saying that both the Army and the Government needed a Dictator. Of course it was not for this, but in spite of it, that I have given you the command.
Page 6 - I have placed you at the head of the Army of the Potomac. Of course I have done this upon what appears to me to be sufficient reasons, and yet I think it best for you to know that there are some things in regard to which I am not quite satisfied with you.
Page 6 - I think it best for you to know that there are some things in regard to which I am not quite satisfied with you. I believe you to be a brave and skilful soldier, which, of course, I like. I also believe you do not mix politics with your profession, in which you are right. You have confidence in yourself, which is a valuable if not an indispensable quality. You are ambitious, which, within reasonable bounds, does good rather than harm; but I...
Page 146 - It is with heartfelt satisfaction, that the Commanding General announces to the army, that the operations of the last three days have determined that our enemy must either ingloriously fly, or come out from behind his defences, and give us battle on our own ground, where certain destruction awaits him.
Page 7 - I much fear that the spirit which you have aided to infuse into the army, of criticizing their commander and withholding confidence from him, will now turn upon you. I shall assist you as far as I can to put it down. Neither you nor Napoleon, if he were alive again, could get any good out of an army while such a spirit prevails in it; and now beware of rashness.

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