Page images
PDF
EPUB

Metropolitan System of Bookkeeping

EMBRACING

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF BOOKKEEPING AND ACCOUNTING FOR
HIGH SCHOOLS, PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS, ACADEMIES AND

ALL OTHER SCHOOLS TEACHING THE SUBJECT

By
W. A. SHEAFFER, PH. B.

Head of Commercial Department West Division High School, Milwaukee, Wis.

Instructor of Accounting Marquette University

[merged small][graphic][subsumed][merged small][merged small]

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

GIFT OF

GINN & CO.
CC 11 1930

COPYRIGHT, 1914
COPYRIGHT, 1916

BY

METROPOLITAN TEXT BOOK COMPANY
PREFACE

In preparing this text on bookkeeping, the author has had the gradual, progressive development of the subject in mind.

A reaction is taking place in the teaching of bookkeeping in the best schools. . There is no good reason why the teaching of bookkeeping, especially in the beginning course, should differ so much from the teaching of other subjects. In other subjects, we do not attempt to teach the pupil at once all the operations necessary to give him a complete understanding of the subject. We' teach him an operation or step at a time.

The author believes that teachers and pupils alike will welcome a text in bookkeeping that takes up one operation at a time, or a new subject, and explains it before undertaking another. Each subject is well illustrated and sufficient exercises are given to enable the pupil to learn one step before studying the next. The development and illustration of a new subject in practically every chapter is a feature that should appeal to every teacher of the subject.

The expression, “learn by doing,” has come to mean little more than routine, mechanical work without much thought. Skill in the mechanical work must be developed by a sufficient number of exercises and sets, but that is simply one side of the study of bookkeeping.

The author believes that if bookkeeping is to maintain its place as a study in the secondary school curriculum on a par with other subjects, the thought side must be emphasized. It must not be simply an incidental matter. Bookkeeping, as a study, should not depend on its practical value alone for its standing. To develop the thought side of bookkeeping, frequent class recitations are necessary.

The arrangement of the text is especially adapted for this purpose.

In beginning with the study of cash, the author believes he is beginning with a subject in which the pupil is naturally interested. The average pupil studying bookkeeping knows little about business, but he does know the difference between cash received and cash paid out.

« PreviousContinue »