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worship of God, with as much ardor as the longchased Hart, ready to expire, pants for the waterbrooks. He looks back to the happiness he was used to enjoy in going to the house of the Lord, and contrasts it with his present forlorn situation : the effect whereof is that his soul is cast down within him. However he is far from looking to, or expecting help from himself or any human aias ; but in the midst of his grief he encourages himself in the Lord. He looks to his works of providence (ver. 6.) which are the ground upon which he exhorts his soul to (ver. 1.) hope in God; even as he at another time lays, “ Becaule thou has been my help, therefore under the shadow of thy wings will I rejoice.” If therefore this might be applied to christian-experience, it is a suitable direction in what

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we should proceed to renew our comforts (viz) looking from ourselves, and upon the ground of the faithful word, which records the mighty acts of the Lord, hope in his mercy, and confide in his veracity.

The penman of Psalm lxxvii. had so far forgot himself as to look to his former experiences to relieve him, under the sense of present guilt; but found the method fail in the trial. Ver. 1-4. he gives a distreffing view of that which troubled his confcience, and ver. 5. 6. he tries what looking to his past enjoyments would do for him. I have considered the days of old, the years of antient times. I call to remembrance my song in the night : 1 commune with mine own heart, and my spirit made diligent search. Thus we see he took the same method that is commonly recommended to, and practised by professors in our day. But his conscience was too sensibly affected with the wrath that lay upon it, to take comfort from any such quarter-ftill he complains, ver. 7. 9; Convinced, in the trial, of the folly of this method he acknowledges his error ver. 10. And I said this is iny infirmity. He tries another expedient ver. 10—20. this is opposed to ver. 5. 6. This method then is

quite the reverse of the former. Instead of looking to his former experience, his fong in the night, &c. he looks now to the wonderful works of God, which were a type of the spiritual redemption by the greatest of all the divine works. If then we count the Psalmist a pattern worthy to be imitated, let us follow his example, cease from this former fruitless method of looking for relief, and renew our joys, by looking to the finished work of the Redeemer.

To conclude: to know the truth as it is in Jesus, is to be wise unto salvation. To experience its genuine influences upon our souls, is to be truly happy, And to contend earnestly for it, against every opposition to it, or subtle corruption of it, is the Christian's highest honor. To profess the faith without enjoying the genuine effects of it, is to have the form without the power of godliness. To talk of experience without a fcriptural knowledge of the Son of God, is mere enthusiasm. And the most flaming profession of knowledge and experience without observing the things that Christ has commanded, is nothing better than a miserable delusion...

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