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Peuma
205724

COPYRIGHT 1902
BY THE TRIBUNE ASSOCIATION.

ALS

FOR CONTENTS AND INDEX SEE END OF VOLUME,

ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS.

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(Prepared by S. Hart Wright, M. D., A. M., Ph. D., Penn Yan, N. Y.)
Five eclipses for 1902, as follows:
I. Partial of the sun, April 8. of less than one digit, seen only in the Arctic Ocean. I
IL Total of the moon, April 22, seen in Asia, Europe and Africa.

III. Partial of the sun, May 7, of about ten digits, seen in New Zealand and in part of the Pacific Ocean.

IV. Total of the moon, October 16-17, visible generally in the United States.

V. Partial of the sun, October 31, of eight digits, seen in Europe and Asia.
Lanar Eclipse, Oct. 18–17* Intercolonial. Eastern. | Central. Mountain. Pacific,

H. M.
H. M. H. M. H.

M H . M.
Eclipse begins...

0 17 mo. 11 17 ev. 10 17 ev. 9 17 ev. 8 17 ev. I Total begins...........

1 19 mo.

0 19 mo. 11 19 ev. 10 19 ev. U Middle................

2 3 mo.

11 3 mo. 03 mo. I 11 3 ev. Total ends........ ... ...

2 48 mo. 1 48 mo. 048 mo.11 48 ev. 10 48 ev. || Partial ends................ 3 50 mo.

2 50 mo. 150 mo. • Evening Phases on 16th, Morning Phases on 17th.

ECLIPSE OF MOON OCTOBER 16-17.

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MOON

MOON WEST

EARTH'S
SHADOW

No. 1. first contact. No. 2. first six digits. No. 3. total and middle. No. 4. last
| six digits. No. 5, last contact. N is north point of the moon No. 1 is 86° east; No.
5, 118° west of it.
Note-The line from the moon's centre to N points to the North Star always.

SUPERIOR PLANETS EAST OR WEST OF THE SUN,
Mars, until March 29................East Mars, after March 29................West
Jupiter, until Jan. 15..and after Aug. 5. East Jupiter, from Jan. 15 to Aug. 5......West
Saturn, until Jan. 9, and after July 17. East Saturn, from Jan. 9 to July 17...... West
Uranus, from June 10 to Dec. 14.....East | Uranus, until June 10 and after Dec. 14. West
THE SEASONS.

MORNING AND EVENING STARS.
D. H.M

Venus from Feb. 14 to Nov. 28 will be
Winter begins 1901, Dec.

7 1 Mo. a morning star, and it will be an evening Spring begins 1902. March

8 Mo. star to Feb. 14 and after Nov. 28, Summer begins 1902, June

9 6 Mo. Mercury, evening star, from Jan. 2 to Autumn begins 1902. Sept.

6 40 Ev. Feb. 18; April 28 to June 23; Aug. 11 to Winter begins 1902, Dec, 22 1 19 Ev. Oct. 19, and after Dec. 12. Mercury,

morning star, Feb. 18 to April 28; June 23
I to Aug. 11; Oct. 19 to Dec. 12.

PLANETS BRIGHTEST. Mercury, Feb 1 to 3 and Sept. 25 to 30. after sunset; also March 11 to 15 and Nov. 4 to 7, rising before the sun. Venus, Jan. 5 ann March 21. Mars, not this year. Jupiter, Aug. 5. Saturn, July 17. Uranus, June 10. Neptune, Dec. 24. Jupiver will be in Capricornus after March 16. Saturr will be la Sagittarius all the year, and Uranus in Scorpio all the year.

ERAS.
The Mahometan year 1320 begins April 10
The Jewish year 5663 begins October 2.
The Japanese year 2562 is 1902 A. D.
The Olympian year 2678 begins in July, 1902.

NOTE--The times of the lunar eclipse of October 16-17, the moon's phenes and the tides for three ports are given in Standard Time, used by railroads, and the

tides the standard used at the ports is that for the 75th meridian. For all other comI putations in the Almanac true mean solar time is used. Standard time, being artificial, cannot be used for such without much confusion and some error, besides being very impracticable where solar time is needed.

AZIMUTH TABLE OF POLARIS, OR NORTH STAR, 1902.

The surveyor may find the true north by observing Polaris either when it crosses the meridian or is at the greatest eastern or western elongation. The latter plan is preferable to the former, but it calls for a knowledge nf the azimuth of the star, which is not uniform for all seasons and latitudes. Hence the table given herewith. If one knows approximately the time when the elongation will be reached, he can follow the star with his transit until it ceases to muve further to the eastward (or westward), Then, by reading his compass and applying the correction for azimuth, he will get the variation of the needle.. In case of doubt it may be wise to repeat the observation a night or two later.

The eastern elongation is the one to use from early May to the middle of October, and the western will serve for all but a few w.cks of the remainder of the year. In 1902 Polaris will be at its eastern elongation on May 10, at about 4:17 a. m.; May 16, 3:54 a. m.; June 1, 2:31 a. m.; June 16, 1:52 a. m.; July 1, 12:54 a. m.; July 16, 11:55 eve.; August 1, 10:53 p. m.; August 16, 9:54 p. n.; September 1, 8:51 p. m.; September 16, 7:52 p. m.; October 1, 6:53 p. m.; October 16, 5:50 p. m. The western elongation occurs on October 16, at about 5:40 a. m.; November 1, 4:37 a. m.; November 16, 3:38 a, m.; December 1, 2:39 a. m.; December 16, 1:40 a. m.; January 1, 12:36 morn.; January 16, 11:36 eve.; February 1 10:37 p. m.; February 15, 9:34 p. m.; March 1, 8:43 p. m.; March 16, 7:41 p. m.; April 1, 6:40 p. m. The event occurs four minutes earlier each night than on the preceding one.

From the closing days of March until May 10 Polaris will be on the meridian, and hence in the true north, when a plumb line will cover it and 38 Cassiopeæ simultaneously. The latter is a star of the sixth inagnitude, some 20 degrees distant from the Pole Star. Delta Cassiopeæ, some 10 degrees further away, but brighter, is approximately in the same celestial longtitude, but 38 Cassiopeæ corresponds much more precisely. It wili be directly under Polaris on April 1, at about 12:47 a. m.; April 16, 11:49 p. m.; May 1, 10:49 p. m., and May 10, 10:14 p. m, AZIMUTH OF POLARIS (NORTH STAR) FOR 1902, WHEN AT ITS GREATEST ELONGATION, EAST OR WEST, FOR THE LATITUDE AND DATES GIVEN.

Polar
Dist. (L

Lat.
Lat. | L
Lat. Lat.

Lat. of PoMonth.

37° laris.

Day..

310

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32

57 58

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3611

36 38 41

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NAANO Set

January 11 12 34/1 22 57|1 24 40

24 4011 26 3211 28 35/1 30 52|1 33 23 1 36 911 39 14 1 42 38 January (11

1 January .. 21

33 February February

35 February March ....

391

411 March

44 1 31 March

48

361 21 April April

51

45

3711 April

56/1
171

401 May

59

21 May

241 May 11

27 June

2911 34 June

34/ June

34 July July

34

17 July 64

31

56 August ... 31

29 1 33 591 August ... 291

27 57 August ...21 1 12 59

241 551 Septemb'r. 1

23
6 1 26

20 Septemb'r.

20 Septemb'r.

611 24 58
51 1 28

36 October ...

22 October ...

49 October ... 21

44
41 1 30 58

301

16 20 November. 1 22 59 40

351 52 November 1

35

19 November

14 December.

47
20

1011 35 561 December (11

38

53/1 38 581 December .21

19
41
15
35
50.

18 December 31|1 12 18/1 22 4011 24 21 1 26 1311 28 16/1 30 321 33 211 35 48 1 38 5211 42 15

57

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31 1 42

50 45

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20

24

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CYCLES. Dominical Letter......

E Julian Period.........................6615 Epact ...............

21 Roman Indiction.. Golden Number........................ 3 Dionysian Period......................

231 Solar Cycle....,

Jewish Lunar Cycle......

15

19

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