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MEMORIALS OF THE INQUISITION.

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plied, and wrung some confessions from him, over the pang she had added to his dying for he appears to have wavered under the hor- agonies, and hastened to follow him to the rid appliance. He was, however, first strangled, dungeon and to the stake. She abandoned and then burned; for nothing could save one so the course of penance which superstition had infected as Don Juan was, from the Inquisitors' imposed, was again immured in the secret grasp.

prisons, where she was detained for eight years, Doctor Juan Gonzalez was another conspi- during which every effort was made to induce cuous victim. He was of Moorish descent, and her to recant, and died at last in an Auto-de-fe one of the most renowned preachers in Spain, at Valladolid, in the year 1568. The Popish

but he embraced the Reformed doctrines; and chronicler, Illescas, narrates, that "she suffered to do so was to embrace death. He left his herself to be burnt alive, notwithstanding the mother and two brothers in the prison, when great and repeated exertions made to reclaim he went forth to his Auto, and was accompanied her, and resisted what was sufficient to melt a by two sisters doomed like himself to the stone-an admirable sermon preached at the flames. He sang the 109th Psalm on his way Auto of that day.” to execution, and addressed a few words of con- The case of Dóna Leanor de Vibero is scarcely solation to one of his sisters, but was speedily less illustrative of the atrocities of Popery. She silenced by the gag. He was degraded from the was the mother of five children who appeared priesthood, and he and his sisters, before they together as criminals at an Auto, but had died were consumed in the flames, were strangled, several years before they were burnt, when no and thus dismissed to the presence of their God taint of Lutheranism was supposed to attach --witnesses against the system whose abettors to the family. But when her children were are said to be drunk with the blood of the arraigned as heretics, because they appealed

saints—the system whose infallible head is to the Word of God, and believed it, an action again parading his pretensions in our land. It was instituted against the dead woman. Witis an ascertained fact, that while Cardinal nesses were put to the torture, and confessed Ximenes presided over the Inquisition-a while under it that Leanor's house had been period of eleven years—51,167 persons were used as Lutheran temple. That was enough. condemned, of whom 2,436 were burned alive; Sentence was therefore pronounced against and it is not to be forgotten, that the system her as an heretic; her property was which led to such butchery glories in the im- fiscated; her bones were dug up and committed, mutability of its dogmas.

with her effigy, to the flames; her house was In another Auto, two remarkable victims of razed, the ground on which it stood was sown Popish ferocity were doomed to the stake. with salt; and a pillar, bearing a suitable inscripThese were Francisco de Vibero Cazalla, parish tion, was erected on the spot. The pillar stood priest of Hormigos, and Antonio Herezuelo, an there till the year 1809, when it was removed advocate of Toro. The latter acted with asto- during the occupation of Spain by the French.* nishing heroism, exhibiting no symptom either We must deter till a future Number the reof terror or of compromise. The horrors of the cital of some other cases selected to illustrate torture, the ignominy implied in being made a the nefarious proceedings of the Holy Office. gazing-stock, and the terrors of the flames, were Monarchs graced them—the members of royal equally without effect. His wife had recanted, households vied with each other in giving them and when he saw her at the Auto in the garb of celebrity. On the 8th of October 1559, Philip a penitent, that occasioned a pang, but all else II. was present at an Auto-de-fe in Valladolid, was endured without shrinking; and even the attended by his son, his sister, the prince of

Popish record declares that he allowed himself Parma, and a crowd of prelates, and nobility of to be burned with unparalleled hardihood. He both sexes. The truculent Inquisitor Valdes was gagged, lest he should address the spectators; presided, and twenty-nine prisoners appeared but, unmoved by all that his blood-thirsty on the scaffold, of whom sixteen were penioppressors could inflict, he passed like the pro- tents—the rest were doomed to death. The phet in a chariot of fire to the world where all chief of these was Don Carlos de Seso, a disis righteous retribution on the one hand, and tinguished nobleman, who had at one time mercy on the other. His courage provoked his performed important services to the emperor, guards, and one of them plunged his lance into Charles V., and was married to Donna Isabella Herezuelo's body amid the flames.

de Castilla, a descendant of the royal family of We have referred to his wife, Leanora de Castille and Leon. He dared, however, to emCisneros. Overcome by terror, or betrayed by brace the truth of God, and must therefore be the craft and deceptions of her tormentors, she exterminated by the upholders of the system had for a time given way; and when we remem- which is the antagonist of that truth. We ber that she was only twenty-two years of age, quote his case as illustrative of the malignity we can scarcely wonder that she wavered at of the Papacy against the Revelation of Christ the sight of torture and death. But her mar- -a malignity which becomes intense in proporEyred husband's look, as she saw him at his tion as the truth is held in purity. Auto, never could be forgotten--she mourned * M'Crie's History of the Reformation in Spain.

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are' -fertilly and wonderfully made." One Papaty, wburere it is fully developed, or is that tzat if there was a part of the face more Ipsit, cerked by the vicinity or shared by the

scac acether, it was the eye-if there was ar

Lore aps tu creeze than another, it was the liy light of Protatantier, is resolutely bent on ex- the ere, and that the same frust that would á tirgushing the light of truth in the blood of mercury, and turn the naked band very speedilt its supporUTS?"

a piece of ice, would soon freeze the eye; and
it were so, many parts of the earth would not in

for an habitation to man. Now here is the point WINTER IN CANADA.

infinite wisiom, that the eye is altogether unafe 11 in very difficult to srive an idea of the cold of a the lungs is more tender than the coating oi

even by the extremest cold. Again, the coating Canarhiasi winter to those who have never experi- hand or of the ears; but if a man's lungs we encen it - a cold which not only converts the rivers freeze, or if he could not breathe with perfect so into wolid pavements, but freezes the arms of the amidst a Canadian winter, of course the corpo men like bruxs and iron a cold in the midat of which, would he immediately depopulated. And the s if yon tenuh metal with your naked hand, your skin lar fact, illustrative of the manifold wisucu will peel off ne if you were handling red-hot iron. God," is, that the most piercing cold, which ma Aftop experiencing it, one can understand what a fearful ineeting the army of Napoleon encountered

you put up your hand involuntarily to discupe? in Kuraia, and with what an emphasis the question lungs. Another thing is very well worthy of below

your nose and ears are there, only exhilarates of the Palmiet may be put: “Who can stand before Hin cold?" It is astonishing how well Thomson could rivers and arms of the sea locked in the embrace

When you see such a vast country, with its mixta piszint * mitoilir scene without having geen it, although, for that very reason, part of his description to be unlocked. Your idea is that it will take most

that tremendous Winter, you wonder how it is is ina curate :

to break up such adamantine frost-work. And rei ► M'Crie, Llorente.

what would take puny man ages to accomplish,

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simply and speedily by the arrangements of the year, diseases of the eyes, the hospital fever, aly wise God." The spring is ushered in diarrhea, and catarrhal pains prevail." " The third

The melting of such enormous season of the year," says the same author, further, of snow makes great floods in the rivers, by “ which I will give the name of the sick season, since : vast fields of ice are forced up and broken it is destructive to the health of the inhabitants, and nents, and they at once carried away into especially of strangers, begins about the 1st of March,

and heard of no more. The change is and continues generally until about the end of May.

udden as to be like magic. For example, I | The south wind takes the place of the east wind, ter

large river thrice with a sledge on solid ice, which had prevailed during the earlier part of the

to-day, and in about three days, I heard year. These south winds are first light, but they inice was gone, and that the steamers were crease gradually; they afterwards decrease in the

clear passage. This is one rast advantage same way; and, indeed, to such a degree, that, during *** iden springs of America; and, in short, when a period of about fifty days, from which they have

customed to the peculiarities of the country, taken the name chamsin, they are very violent and

ch at first seemed strange and disagreeable, hot, and hence would become insupportable, if they 30 becomes tolerable, but is often found to be blew without cessation. At this season of the year 1 uzun ad conducive to human comfort.--Rev. James wounds heal with difficulty, and are easily seized

with mortification. Sicknesses of all kinds take an

unusual character, and require the greatest careSe

fulness on the part of the physician; and, in general, **** Tider THE DISEASES OF EGYPT.

all living beings are more or less affected."-Heng

stenberg.
vii. 15, it is said, " And the Lord will remove
ee all sickness, and will put none of the evil
of Egypt, which thou knowest, upon thee."

AN ENEMY SOFTENED.
ar expression is also found in Exod. xv. 26:
u wilt diligently hearken to the voice of the “A man of my acquaintance,” says Dr. Dwight, “who
hy God, and wilt do that which is right in his was of a vehement and rigid temper, had many years

and wilt give ear to his commandments, and since a dispute with a friend of his, a professor of; :* 111 his statutes, I will put none of these diseases religion, and had been injured by him. With strong

hee, which I have brought upon the Egyptians: feelings of resentment, he made him a visit, for the he Lord am he who healeth thee.”

60, it is said, “And the Lord will bring again avowed purpose of quarrelling with him. He acThee all the diseases of Egypt, of which thou cordingly stated the nature and extent of the injury,

fraid, and they shall cleave to thee.” In verses and was preparing, as he afterwards confessed, to seze met d 35 of the same chapter, erring Israel is load him with a train of severe reproaches, when his

tened with the infliction of a sickness pecu- friend cut him short by acknowledging, with the 1 Egyptian, concerning which we have already in utmost readiness and frankness, the injustice of which

er connection made investigation.
of these scattered passages agree in this, that he had been guilty; expressing his own regret for the
it

, in reference to diseases, is a very peculiar land, wrong he had done, requesting his forgiveness, and
3 visited by them in a very special degree. The proffering him ample compensation. He was com-
ants of all those who have made the diseases of pelled to say that he was satistied, and withdrew full

pt an object of particular attention, show that of mortification that he had been precluded from juthor is right in this. Wagner, in his Natural

ory of Man, calls Egypt "a great focus of the venting his indignation and wounding his friend ases in universal history.” De Chabrol, in his

with keen and violent reproaches for his conduct. to quiry concerning the Customs of the Modern In- “As he was walking homeward, he said to himself Liesitants of Egypt, of the most important diseases, to this effect: 'There must be something more in

“With an almost equable temperature, and religion than I have hitherto suspected. Were any an always serene sky, Egypt can have only a

man to address me in the tone of haughtiness and 07 ** All number of diseases; but they are for the most 1 tsrt terrible."

provocation with which I accosted my friend this har Thę same author then speaks of single maladies, morning, it would be impossible for me to preserve od pet plague, which is almost never wanting in Cairo, the equanimity of which I have been a witness; and teed particularly in Alexandria; the dysentery, of especially with so much frankness, humility, and Fiaich he says, "This disease causes great destruction meekness, to acknowledge the wrong which I had

nong them, and especially attacks the children, done; 80 readily ask forgiveness of the man whom I po hich it carries off in a frightful manner;" the

iseases of the eyes, with which one at least out of had injured; and so cheerfully promise a satisfactory very five individuals is afflicted; the small pox, which recompense. I should have met his anger with at

Egypt is frightful, and rages far worse than in least equal resentment, paid him reproach for reEurope, &c.

roach, and inflicted wound for wound. There is someIn the "Observations upon several Diseases which thing in this man’s disposition which is not in mine. -attacked the Soldiers of the French Army," four seaBons of the year are named with reference to health- There is something in the religion which he professes,

fulness. The first comprises the time of the inunda and which I am forced to believe he feels--something * tion. “I name," says the author, " this first season which makes him so superior, so much better, so

of the year, which continues about three months, the much more amiable, than I can pretend to be. The damp season; it may be considered as the winter of subject strikes me in a manner to which I have the country. The west wind, which then blows, in

hitherto been a stranger. It is high time to examine creases the dampness of the atmosphere, which at evening, and especially in the morning, is full of mist. it more thoroughly, with more candour, and with The consequence is a cuciness, which is uncomfortable, greater solicitude, also, than I have done hitherto. and detrimental to animal secretions. In this season “From this incident, a train of thoughts and emo

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De Seso was arrested at Logrono, where he “Yet more outrageous is the season stillhad for some time been busy spreading the

A deeper horror in Siberian wilds, knowledge of Reformed doctrines, and thrown

Where Winter keeps his unrejoicing court;

And in his airy hall the loud misrule into the secret prisons of the Inquisition at

Of driving tempest is for ever heard. Valladolid. During all his trials he maintained There through the ragged woods, absorpt in snow, the most unwavering constancy, withstanding Sole tenant of these shades, the shaggy bear, alike the blandish:nents and the tortures of With dangling ice, all horrid, stalks forlorn. his oppressors. When sentenced to die, he

Slow-paced and sourer as the storms increase,

He makes his bed beneath the drifted snow; prepared a confession of his faith so vigorous

And, scorning the complainings of distress, in point of sentiment, and so scriptural in point

Hardens his heart against assailing want, of doctrine, as to have surprised some of the While tempted, vigorous o'er the marble waste, functionaries of the Holy Office. During the On sleds reclined, the furry Russian sits; night prior to his death, he was teased by friars And by his rein-deer drawn, behind him throws to recant; but all was in vain. He appeared at

A shining kingdom in a winter day." the Auto with the gag in his mouth, which, The poet here just takes a British winter and eshowever, was removed when he was bound to aggerates it, adding, to make up his picture, bears. the stake, in the hope he might recant. But sledges, rein-deer, &c. But there is this vast ant De Seso used his freedom of speech only to ex. providential difference, that whereas our winters art hort the executioners to do their duty. They accompanied with driving tempests,” there is comlit the pile, and he expired without a struggle Driving tempests are not for ever heard,” other

paratively little wind where the frost is so intense. or a groan, in the forty-third year of his age.

wise the cold would be a far more fearful thing iban But we must again pause. It was in this it really is. There is very little, indeed, either remorseless way that the Inquisition at Seville, wind or rain, and far less tempest. The frost, wl in the first year after its erection, committed it once sets in, is steady and constant, only interruz two thousand persons alive to the flames, burnt ed occasionally by slight thaws and falls of sno as many in effigy, and condemned seventeen

There are several things also extremely to be admi thousand to various forms of penances. Be- of such fearful cold, we naturally imagine that it

ed in the arrangements of Jehovah. When one hears | tween the year 1480 and the year 1520, Puig. must be a dreadful thing to live in the midst of it. blanch computes that forty-five thousand were We cannot imagine how a man can see and breathe burnt alive in the archbishopric of Seville amidst a cold that will freeze mercury. . Now it is alone. During the same period about thirty undoubtedly destructive to human life, if men are thousand persons informed against themselves

not properly clothed. When I was there, I heard of in Andalusia alone, in the hope of securing a

a person who had escaped from a lunatic asylum.

not being properly dressed, was frozen dend in a very mitigated punishment; while the entire vumber short space; but if one is properly dressed, there condemned in Spain during a period of thirty- would be little danger even in going to the North six years, amounted, according to Llorente, to Pole; and simply because, owing to the manifest one hundred and ninety-one thousand four

design of God, the parts that require to be exposed hundred and twenty-three. All this, let it be posed, for a man must see and breathe, otherwise the

will not freeze. A man's eyes and lungs must be exremembered, was done to preserve the purity country would be uninhabitable; and these are just

of religion !-all this was perpetrated to pro- the parts that are not injured' by frost. This is a mote the salvation of sinners! Ought we not very singular thing, and illustrates the truth that we rather to say, All this was done to prove that are “fearfully and wonderfully made." One would Popery, wherever it is fully developed, or is think that if there was a part of the face more tender not checked by the vicinity or shamed by the than another, it was the eye-if there was anything

more apt to freeze than another, it was the liquid op light of Protestantism, is resolutely bent on ex

the eye, and that the same frost that would congeal tinguishing the light of truth in the blood of mercury, and turn the naked band very speedily into its supporters ? *

a piece of ice, would soon freeze the eye; and yet, if it were so, many parts of the earth would not be fit

for an habitation to man. Now here is the proof of WINTER IN CANADA.

infinite wisdom, that the eye is altogether unaffected,

even by the extremest cold. Again, the coating of It is very difficult to give an idea of the cold of a Canadian winter to those who have never experi- hand or of the ears; but if a man's lungs were to

the lungs is more tender than the coating of the enced it—a cold which not only converts the rivers freeze, or if he could not breathe with perfect safety into solid pavements, but freezes the arms of the

amidst a Canadian winter, of course the country sea like brass and iron-a cold in the midst of which, if you touch metal with your naked hand, your skin

would he immediately depopulated. And the singu,

lar fact, illustrative of the “manifold wisdom of will peel off as if you were handling red-hot iron. After experiencing it, one can understand what a

God," is, that the most piercing cold, which makes fearful meeting the army of Napoleon encountered

you put up your hand involuntarily to discorer if ! in Russia, and with what an emphasis the question lungs. Another thing is very well worthy of police

.

your nose and ears are there, only exhilarates Four of the Psalmist may be put: “Who can stand before His cold." It is astonishing how well Thomson could rivers and arms of the sea locked in the embrace of

When you see such a vast country, with its mighty paint a similar scene without having seen it, although, for that very reason, part of his description to be unlocked. Your idea is, that it will take months

that tremendous Winter, you wonder how it is erer is inaccurate :

to break up such adamantine frost-work. And yet * M'Crie, Llorente.

what would take puny pan ages to accomplish, is

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done very simply and speedily by the arrangements of the year, diseases of the eyes, the hospital fever, of tie "only wise God." The spring is ushered in diarrhoea, and catarrhal pains prevail." "The third alrett once. The melting of such enormous season of the year," says the same author, further,

ities of snow makes great floods in the rivers, by “ which I will give the name of the sick season, since .ch the vast fields of ice are forced up and broken it is destructive to the health of the inhabitants, and i o iragments, and they at once carried away into especially of strangers, begins about the 1st of March, the ocean, and heard of no more, The change is and continues generally until about the end of May. often so sudden as to be like magic. For example, I The south wind takes the place of the east wind, crossed a large river thrice with a sledge on solid ice, which had prevailed during the earlier part of the as it were to-day, and in about three days, I heard year. These south winds are first light, but they inthat the ice was gone, and that the steamers were crease gradually; they afterwards decrease in the making a clear passage. This is one rast advantage same way; and, indeed, to such a degree, that, during in the sudden springs of America; and, in short, when a period of about fifty days, from which they have one is accustomed to the peculiarities of the country, taken the name chamsin, they are very violent and that which at first seemed strange and disagreeable, hot, and hence would become insupportable, if they not only becomes tolerable, but is often found to be blew without cessation. At this season of the year useful and conducive to human comfort.--- Rev. James wounds heal with difficulty, and are easily seized Cegg.

with mortification. Sicknesses of all kinds take an unusual character, and require the greatest carefulness on the part of the physician;

and, in general, THE DISEASES OF EGYPT.

all living beings are more or less affected.”-Heng

stenberg. Ix Deut. vi. 15, it is said, " And the Lord will remove from thee all sickness, and will put none of the evil diseases of Egypt, which thou knowest, upon thee."

AN ENEMY SOFTENED. imilar expression is also found in Exod. xv. 26:

thou wilt diligently hearken to the voice of the “A man of my acquaintance,” says Dr. Dwight, “who nd thy God, and wilt do that which is right in his

was of a vehement and rigid temper, had many years ght, and wilt give ear to his commandments, and since a dispute with a friend of his, a professor of

ep all his statutes, I will put none of these diseases religion, and had been injured by him. With strong upon thee, which I have brought upon the Egyptians: feelings of resentment, he made him a visit, for the for I the Lord am he who healeth thee." uz viii. 60, it is said, “And the Lord will bring again avowed purpose of quarrelling with him. He acupon thee all the diseases of Egypt, of which thou cordingly stated the nature and extent of the injury, wast afraid, and they shall cleave to thee.” In verses and was preparing, as he afterwards confessed, to 27 and 35 of the same chapter, erring Israel is load him with a train of severe reproaches, when his threatened with the infliction of a sickness pecu- | friend cut him short by acknowledging, with the

· Egyptian, concerning which we have already in utmost readiness and frankness, the injustice of which atviher connection made investigation.

All of these scattered passages agree in this, that he had been guilty; expressing his own regret for the Egypt, in reference to diseases, is a very peculiar land, wrong he had done, requesting his forgiveness, and and is visited by them in a very special degree. The proffering him ample compensation. He was comaccounts of all those who have made the diseases of pelled to say that he was satistied, and withdrew full Egypt an object of particular attention, show that of mortification that he had been precluded from the author is right in this. Wagner, in his Natural venting his indignation and wounding his friend History of Man, calls Egypt “a great focus of the diseases in universal history." De Chabrol, in his

with keen and violent reproaches for his conduct. "* Inquiry concerning the Customs of the Modern In- As he was walking homeward, he said to himself habitants of Egypt," of the most important diseases, to this effect: “There must be something more in says, “With an almost equable temperature, and religion than I have hitherto suspected. Were any with an always serene sky, Egypt can have only a

man to address me in the tone of haughtiness and stuall number of diseases; but they are for the most part terrible.”

provocation with which I accosted my friend this The same author then speaks of single maladies, morning, it would be impossible for me to preserve the plague, which is almost never wanting in Cairo, the equanimity of which I have been a witness; and and particularly in Alexandria; the dysentery, of especially with so much frankness, humility, and which he says, " This disease causes great destruction meekness, to acknowledge the wrong which I had among them, and especially attacks the children, done; so readily ask forgiveness of the man whom I which it carries off in a frightful manner;' diseases of the eyes, with which one at least' out of had injured; and so cheerfully promise a satisfactory very five individuals is afflicted; the small pox, which recompense. I should have met his anger with at in Egypt is frightful, and rages far worse than in least equal resentment, paid him reproach for reEurope, &c.

roach, and inflicted wound for wound. There is someIn the “Observations upon several Diseases which thing in this man's disposition which is not in mine. attacked the Soldiers of the French Army,” four seasons of the year are named with reference to health- There is something in the religion which he professes, fulness. The first comprises the time of the inundar and which I am forced to believe he feels--something tion. “I name," says the author, " this first season which makes him so superior, so much better, so of the

which continues about three months, the much more amiable, than I can pretend to be. The damp season; it may be considered as the winter of the country. The west wind, which then blows, in subject strikes me in a manner to which I have

hitherto been a stranger. It is high time to examine creases the dampness of the atmosphere, which at evening, and especially in the morning, is full of mist. it more thoroughly, with more candour, and with The consequence is a utiness, which is uncomfortable, greater solicitude, also, than I have done hitherto. and detrimental to animal secretions. In this season "From this incident, a train of thoughts and emo

66

year,

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