Journal, Volume 35

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1901
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Page 8 - ... found hitherto in public servants of this class there is now added a demand for professional training but lately unheard of. The post has become a professional one and the principals themselves should be the first to recognize the fact. To do so is not to magnify one's office — rather failure not to do so means the acceptance of too low a standard. The daily problems of the principal of a large school are to some degree comparable to those of the executives of the higher institutions; the difficulties...
Page 11 - Through these — lithe European powers have tried to protect, by separation, their stronger spheres of influence. The principal's position as a harmonizer of different departments reminds one of these artificial political creations. But if schools lose equilibrium the immediate disaster to students is greater than when colleges become lop-sided. Hence the principal must be actively a director as well as a buffer, and hence, again, we come to the necessity of broad preparation and a wide outlook....
Page 11 - ... to say that lack of accurate knowledge of the conditions and character of- the work of the grammar grades is the greatest fault of the present generation of high school principals. The failure to co-ordinate the departments is shown by the proverbial gap between the grades and the high school, that chasm of discouragement and failure which swallows so many pupils. This fault does not lie wholly with the grades, any more than the former hiatus between school and college lay altogether upon the...
Page 8 - The daily problems of the principal of a large school are, to some degree, comparable to those of the executives of the higher institutions ; the difficulties in a small school are sometimes even more acute. In the high school the question of the adjustment of work to the pupil, of the pupil to his work, and of different departments to each other, bring problems as perplexing and varied as those found at any stage of the pupil's advancement. These have lately increased by the broadening of courses...
Page 10 - ... literature — whether the latter is ancient or modern, English or Greek — has the greatest advantage. These studies deal most directly with human nature as exhibited individually or in the mass. But that is beside the question. To make the first essential in the choice of a principal the fact that he is a classicist or a scientist is folly. Yet many boards still do this and are encouraged to do it. The prime requisite is scholarship vital enough to continue its growth ; a scholarship that...
Page 3 - His incisive and vigorous utterance, his wise counsel, we shall hear no more. The Club directs that this tribute to the memory of our friend and colleague, this recognition on our part of his wide learning, his vigorous intellect and his tireless labor for the cause of education alike in the class room and in his writings, be spread upon the minutes of the Club and communicated to Professor Hinsdale's family. R. HUDSON, EA LYMAN, HM SLAUSON, Committee. The Club thereupon adjourned to meet in the...
Page 14 - ... college. The committee was unanimous in reaffirming the position taken by the Greek conference of the Committee of Ten, and• proposed a program which is in essential agreement with those of the Commission of New England Colleges and the Columbia conference of 1896. The committee recommends that three years be devoted to the study of Greek in secondary schools, with the understanding that the year consists of not less than thirty-eight weeks of school work, and that five periods...
Page 9 - ... partisans rather than intellectual patriots. Having found a youth with interest and preference for their rhosen line, they have tried to foster those qualities by the process of exclusion. Then they have been active, sometimes officious, in getting for this product a position to teach — which is all right ; or quite as likely, a place as principal or superintendent, where he is expected not only to teach but to arrange his dominion, large or small, around the pivotal Latin or the pivotal science,...
Page 20 - To accomplish this, a meter-stick with a straight edge is placed on the plane and slid down until its end just touches the table, when 75 cm. mark is noted. The vertical rise needs to be measured with considerable care. Half a meter-stick mounted on a suitable base will be useful for this. The pupil then finds by trial what weight in the pan is necessary to pull the car up the plane with uniform speed after it is — 20 — — 21 — started.
Page 1 - At the opening of the session Principal JH Harris, President of the Club, referred briefly but feelingly to the death of Professor BA Hinsdale, who had been so closely identified with the work and interests of the Club, and appointed a committee to draft a memorial for presentation to the Club. The first topic discussed was "The Newly Formulated Entrance Requirements to the University of Michigan...

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