A Conflict of Visions: Ideological Origins of Political Struggles

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Basic Books, 2007 M06 5 - 352 pages
Controversies in politics arise from many sources, but the conflicts that endure for generations or centuries show a remarkably consistent pattern. In this classic work, Thomas Sowell analyzes this pattern. He describes the two competing visions that shape our debates about the nature of reason, justice, equality, and power: the "constrained" vision, which sees human nature as unchanging and selfish, and the "unconstrained" vision, in which human nature is malleable and perfectible. A Conflict of Visions offers a convincing case that ethical and policy disputes circle around the disparity between both outlooks.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - applemcg - LibraryThing

the first few chapters held my attention. Sowell's treatment of constrained and unconstrained vision were sufficient. Intellectual and erudite, but not captivating. On first glance,unconstrained and ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SamTekoa - LibraryThing

Kind of a difficult read. Helpful in understanding political dialogue or anyother social behavior viewpoint. Read full review

Contents

The Role of Visions 3
3
Constrained and Unconstrained Visions 9
9
Visions of Knowledge and Reason 36
36
Visions of Social Processes 69
69
Varieties and Dynamics of Visions 102
102
APPLICATIONS
131
Visions of Equality 133
133
Visions of Power 156
156
Visions of Justice 192
192
Visions Values and Paradigms 230
230
Notes 265
265
Index 307
307
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About the author (2007)

Thomas Sowell has taught economics at a number of colleges and universities, including Cornell, University of California Los Angeles, and Amherst. He has published both scholarly and popular articles and books on economics, and is currently a scholar in residence at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

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