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The World To-Day

A Unique Literary Undertaking. id To-Day is a treasury of information, political, statistical, biographical, scientific, 2.4. It is a unique literary undertaking, in that it combines the features of a

* The task of reading all the leading publications of the world, that is admittedly Es ndertaken by the staff oi editors and contributors. It is their aim and endeavor

3. the urr.portant; in all cases seeking the original sources for verification of e atsciute reliability. Articles are written in a bright, attractive style. Dry technical 7. common interest are avoided. The aim is not only to instruct but to entertain.

Editor, EDMUND BUCKLEY, Ph.D.

University of Chicago.

Associate Editors EUGENE PARSONS, A.M. ELIZABETH A. REED, A.M.

AMONG THE MANY SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS ARE

.

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Plan of the Work ld To-Day comprises twelve numbers each year. Each issue is complete in itself, ed a phabetically from A to Z. A cumulative index is published in each issue and a e sí each volume. The purpose is not only to make the work a storehouse of facts, * reference book by the alphabetical arrangement of subjects and by the use of indexes nous the reader may easily find the information for which he is looking. -Id To-Day conflicts with no other periodical or publication. Its plan is unique

, its s va ve inestimable Its watchword is Progress and it is published solely for the cers who are seeking knowledge and advancement.

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Beautifully Illustrated. of The World To-Day is its large and beautiful illustrations. Appreciating the cres, special attention is given to the reproduction of photographs of notable events at cert peuple, works of art, new inventions, famous scenes, etc. It is in fact a mirror of

cf is different phases

0.P. AUSTIN

.

OMPRISE A VOLUME, MAKING TWO VOLUMES EACH YEAR
MBERS OONTAIN FROM 128 TO 152 QUARTO PAGES,
Y 103-4 INCHES, MAKING ABOUT 1600 PAGES A YEAR.
"RATED. PRINTED ON FINE SUPER-CALENDERED PAPER.
PRICE, 25 CENTS PER COPY. $3.00 A YEAR

BUSSELL STURGIS, A.M., Ph.D.

ART. ARCHITECTURE Editor Art Department Century Dictionary," " Universal Encyclopedia," eic, A. C. TRUE

AGRICULTURE Director U. s. once of Experiment Stations, Washington, D. c.' GEORGE A. DORSEY, Ph.D.

ANTHROPOLOGY Curator Field Columbian Musuem, Chicago. W. J. McGEE

ANTHROPOLOGY Bureau of American Ethnology, Washington, D. c. WILLIAM C. WINSLOW, Ph.D., D.C.L., LL.D.

ARCHAEOLOGY (Egypt) Vice-President Egypt Exploration Fund, Boston. ARTHUR FAIRBANKS, Ph.D.

ARCHAEOLOGY Professor of Greek, University of Iowa. HERBERT A. HOWE, A.M., Sc.D.

ASTRONOMY Director Chamberlin Observatory, Universiiy of Denver. JOHN M. COULTER, A.M., Ph.D.

BOTANY Professor of Botany, University of Chicago. LYMAN B. GLOVER

DRAMA Dramatic and Musicai Critic, Chicago Record-Heraia." F. SPENCER BALDWIN, Ph.D., R.P.D.

ECONOMICS Professor of Political Economy and Social Science, Boston Üriversity.

ECONOMICS Chiet Bureau of Statistics, Treasury Dept., Washington, D. c. W. M. DANIELS, A.M.

ECONOMICS (Finance) Professor of Economics, Princeton University. WILLIAM F. WILLOUGHBY, Ph.D.

ECONOMICS (Labor) Treasurer of Porto Rico: (Formerly U. s. Dept. of Labor). EDWARD W. BEMIS, Ph.D. Cleveland, Ohio.

ECONOMICS (Municipal Questions) EDWARD D. JONES, Ph.D.

ECONOMICS (Resources and Industries) School of Commerce, University of Michigan. ROLAND P. FALKNER, Ph.D.

ECONOMICS (Resources and Industries) Library of Congress (ex-Prof. of Finance and Economics, University of Pennsylvania). R. H. THURSTON, C.E., Ph.B., LL.D.

ENGINEERING Director Sibley College; Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Cornell University.

ENGINEERING Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, Sidley College, Cornell University.

GEOGRAPHY Geographer U. s. Geological Survey, Washington, D. c.

GEOLOGY Hydrographer U.'s. Geological Survey, Washington, D. c.

GEOLOGY (Fossil Plants) United States Geological Survey, Wasuington, D. c.

HISTORY Professor of History, University oi Illinois:

HISTORY Professor of American History, University of Nebraska.

HISTORY President University of Oregon.

HORTICULTURE Professor of Horticuliure; Cornell University.

LAW (Constitutional) Professor of Political science, University of Iowa.

LAW (Corporation) Editor National Corporation Reporter."

LITERATURE Professor of English and Rhetoric, University of Michigan."

LITERATURE Ex-Professor of English Literature, Northwestern University.

LITERATURE Professor of Romance Languages, Adelbert College.

LITERATURE Critical staff, he Dial.''

MEDICINE SURGERY

153-155 La Salle Street,

CHICADO

HENRY H. NORRIS, M.E.

ent Encyclopedia Company,

HENRY GANNETT

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THE SIMPLE LIFE OF A QUEEN. AN “AT HOME” PHOTOGRAPH OF CARMEN SYLVA,

QUEEN OF ROUMANIA.
(SAMPLE OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS OF NOTED PEOPLE)

A New Idea-What is Said

Of It. "The Outlook," New York: “We commend the idea, and we commend also the thoroughness and care with which the articles have been prepared. It will doubtless make a place for itself as a reference work unlike any other, and will be of great utility to students and writers.

“ The Inter-Ocean," Chicago: “We are in receipt of work that promises to be of the highest value. It is admirably illustrated, and it is intended to make illustrations a prominent feature of the publication. The paper, type and presswork are excellent, and for every reason this work merits the highest success.'

“The Advance,” Chicago: "It deals with the latest informatiou in current history and research upon the encyclopedia plan, thus giving up-to-date facts upon a very wide variety of topics of current interest. The great advantage to the busy man is obvious. He has the latest information conveniently classified and indexed for quick reference. The great defect of costly encyclopedias is that they quickly get out of date on many subjects. This encyclopedia renews its youth month by month."

'The Tribune,”. Chicago: "This publication is becomng of greater value every month."

“ The Standard,” Chicago: "We do not see how any wide-awake person can get along without it. Its purpose and plan is entirely different from a magazine like the "Review of Reviews." There are many illustrations and the typography is excellent.

“The American,” Nashville: "A publication which no man of affairs, po one who would keep abreast of the times, and certainly no one who has need of a reference work that deals with things which are of to-day can get along without. * * * It is a very handsome publication.

The work is not issued in haphazard fashion, but every detail shows the most painstaking attention. The mechanical work is a marvel of taste and care, and the fine paper and clear type used make it a delight to the eye."

“The Dial,” Chicago: It has provided itself with an excellent staff of contributors * * * makes a very credible showing."

“The Times," New York: “The editors have shaped their work in accordance with the demands of the average investigator into current events. It is well illustrated with portraits, maps and views and should prove a valuable reference."

“The Mail and Express," New York: It will prove a boun to busy workers, to all who need information at once on subjects which come up during the year. Its reli. ability is guaranteed by the editors. Its success seems to us assured."

“The Book Buyer," New York: "It deals with tho present and with yesterday; with the past it has no concern. That the enterprise will fill, if not a long-felt want, at least one ingeniously discerned there can be no doubt.

“The Independent,". New York: "The idea of this magazine is a good one and we look to see it fill a long-felt want.

“The Fourth Estate," New York: "A single glance through its pages is sufficient to demonstrate its usefulness to all who are interested in important happenings."

"The Journal,” Minneapolis: "It cannot fail to win. The list of trained 'specialists suggests that the projectors will keep the monthly issue hot on the trail of occurrences worthy of record."

"The Commercial Advertiser," New York: "We give it our cordial endorsement."

“The Plain Dealer,” Cleveland: "The idea is a good one and it has been well worked up. A large corps of competent editors and contributors have been engaged; the names announced giving assurance that the work will be well done."

“National Printer-Journalist,” Chicago: "It must prove of great value in newspaper and printing offices as a meaus of ready reference."

“The Sun," New York: "Few things are more troublesome to get at than accurate statements about what has just happened. A week or a fortnight suffices to put the ephemeral accounts of the daily press out of reach or to make the effort to snatch back the important part that has slipped by painful and laborious. * The articles are written by a large staff of competent authorities."

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T HOME" PHOTOGRAPH OF CARMEN SYLVA,
F ROUMANIA.
TRATIONS OF NOTED PEOPLE)

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"The Standard,” Chicago: "We do not see how any
wide-awake person can get along without it. Its purpose
and plan is entirely different from a magazine like the
"Review of Reviews." There are many illustrations and
the typography is excellent."

"The American," Nashville: "A publication which
no man of affairs, po one who would keep abreast of the
times, and certainly no one who has need of a reference
work that deals with things which are of to-day can get
along without. ** It is a very handsome publication.
**°The work is not issued in haphazard fashion, but
every detail shows the most painstaking attention. The
mechanical work is a marvel of taste and care, and the fine
paper and clear type used make it a delight to the eye."

"The Dial,Chicago: It has provided itself with an
excellent staff of contributors *** makes & very cred.
ible showing."

"The Times," New York: "The editors have shaped their work in accordane with the demands of the average investigator into current events. It is well illustrated with portraits, maps and views and should prove a valuable reference,

"The Mail and Express," New York: It will prova a boon to busy workers, to all who need information at once on subjects which come up during the year. Its reliability

is guaranteed by the editors. Its success seems to "The Book Buyer," New York: "It deals with the

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us assured."
present and with yesterday, with the past it has no con
cern. That the enterprise will fill, if not a long-felt want
at least one ingeniously discerned there can be no doubt."

"The Independent," New York: "The idea of this
magazine is a good one and we look to see it fill a long-felt
want.

"The Fourth Estate," New York: "A single glance through its pages is sufficient to demonstrate its nsefulness to all who are interested in important happenings."

"The Journal,Minneapolis: "It cannot fail to win The list of trained specialists suggests that the projectors will keep the monthly issue hot on the trail of occurrences worthy of record."

"The Commercial Advertiser," New York: "We give it our cordial endorsement."

"The Plain Dealer," Cleveland: "The idea is a good one and it has been well worked up. A large corps of conipetent editors and contributors have been engaged: the names announced giving assurance that

the work will be National Printer-Journalist,Chicago: "It must prove of great value

in newspaper and printing offices as a "The Sun," New York: "Few things are more

meaus of ready reference.
troublesome to get at than accurate statements about
what has just happened. A week or a fortnight suffices to
put the ephemeral accounts of the daily press out of reach
or to make the effort to snatch back the important part
that has slipped by painful and laborious. ** The
articles are written by a large staff of competent au-
thorities."

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