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it. In Cuba you have got the eternal gratitude of a free people. In the Philippine Islands you have got the hatred and sulien submission of a subjugated people. From Cuba you have brought home nothing but glory. From the Philippines you have brought home nothing of glory.” As to the cost of the Philippine policy in the degradation of American character Senator Hoar said: "If a strong people tries to govern a weak one against its will the home government will grow despotic too. You cannot maintain despotism in Asia and a republic in America. If you try to deprive even a savage or a barbarian of his just rights you can never do it without becoming a savage or a barbarian yourself.” On the subject of the nation's future policy toward the islands the senator said: "Was it ever heard before that a civilized, hu

mane and Christian nation made war upon GEORGE F. HOAR.

a people and refused to tell them what they V. S. Senator from Massachusetts.

wanted of them? You refuse to tell these plan to send two native delegates to Wash- people this year or next year or perhaps for ington. Even if such avowed revolution

twenty years whether you mean in the end ists as Aguinaldo and Mabini were sent,

to deprive them of their independence or says Governor Taft, little or harm

You say you want them to submit. would result, while the quieting effect upon

To submit to what? To mere military the natives of giving them an important is that military force to be exerted? You

force? But for what purpose or what end voice in their government at home and in

decline to tell them.” Denunciation of the the United States would be most valuable.

water torture and other abuses of military

rule led up to a declaration of the futility Of the many speeches made of establishing a peace which is no peace. Senator

in the senate on the Philippine Hoar's Speech,

question while the civil govern

ment bill was under consideration, that of Senator Hoar in favor of independence for the Filipinos was without doubt the chief oratorical effort. Senator Spooner's speech summing up the case for the government, was the most notable one on that side of the question. The speech of Senator Hoar, delivered May 22, was, perhaps, the greatest heard in the senate for a generation, being an impassioned plea on behalf of the nation's ideals of liberty as expressed in the Declaration of Independence. Contrasting the policy employed in Cuba with that employed in the Philippines, the venerable senator said: “For the Philippine islands you have had to repeal the Declaration of Independence. For Cuba you have had to reaffirm it and give it new lustre. For the Philippine islands you have had to convert the Monroe doctrine into a document of mere selfishness. For

SENATOR JOHN LOWNDES MC LAURIN. Cuba you have acted on it and vindicated

The democratic senator who voted in favor of

Philippine Bill.

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it. In Cuba you have got the eternal gratitude of a free people. In the Philippine Islands you have got the hatred and sullen submission of a subjugated people. From Cuba you have brought home nothing but glory. From the Philippines you have brought home nothing of glory." As to the cost of the Philippine policy in the degradation of American character Senator Hoar said: "If a strong people tries to govern a weak one against its will the home government will grow despotic too. You cannot maintain despotism in Asia and a republic in America. If you try to deprive even a savage or a barbarian of his just rights you can never do it without becoming a savage or a barbarian yourself." On the subject of the nation's future policy toward the islands the senator said: "Was it ever heard before that a civilized, humane and Christian nation made war upon a people and refused to tell them what they wanted of them? You refuse to tell these people this year or next year or perhaps for

"You will not settle this thing in a genera- stead of denouncing it. Answering the tion or in a century or in ten centuries charges of cruelty brought against the Amuntil it is settled right. It will never be erican army, the senator said: "Never settled right until you look for your coun- in the annals of time,—say what you will sellors to George Washington and Thomas about the brutal policy of the administraJefferson and John Quincy Adams and tion,—has there been carried by an army Abraham Lincoln and not to the represen so much of amelioration, so much of uptatives of the war department." Though building, so much of reform, of kindness the effect of this speech on the Philippine and tenderness, as was carried by this army controversy is not likely to be very great, of ours under the instruction of William at least the world is better for Senator McKinley. It was a destructive war, of Hoar's magnificent appeal on behalf of course, but along with the destruction of liberty.

war were the constructive forces of peace and humanity." Mr. Spooner declared that he was not able to contemplate with equanimity the plan of admitting the Philippines to the union as a state or states. Nothing was dearer to him except his home ties than the belief that this government should be confined to this continent. On this point very few thoughtful Americans are likely to disagree with Senator Spooner. To dilute and contaminate American citizenship by admitting millions of orientals to its privileges would be a piece of folly not often surpassed.

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twenty years whether you mean in the end to deprive them of their independence or no. You say you want them to submit. To submit to what? To mere military force? But for what purpose or what end is that military force to be exerted? You decline to tell them.Denunciation of the water torture and other abuses of military

rule led up to a declaration of the futility de of establishing a peace which is no peace ne

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On Memorial day President
President

Roosevelt contributed to the dis-
Roosevelt's
Addresses. cussion of the government's

policy in the Philippines a remarkable address delivered at Arlington cemetery before a large audience, including many veterans of the civil war. In defending the good name of the army from the accusations of cruelty brought against it, he took occasion to denounce lynching in the United States. His language on

this subject gave offense to many persons JOHN C. SPOONER.

who assume to speak for public sentiment U.S. Senator from Wisconsin.

in the south. After declaring that the

many barbarities practised by Filipinos An able defense of the ad- against soldiers and natives friendly to ministration's policy was de American rule “cannot be held to extenuate livered by Senator Spooner on any wrong doer on our side,” the president

May 29 and 31. He declared continued : at the start that he was not in favor of “From time to time there occur in our the permanent dominion of the United country, to the deep and lasting shame of States over the Philippines

. However, it our people, lynchings carried on under cirwas impossible for the United States to cumstances of inhuman cruelty and barleave those islands like a coward, abandon- barity—a cruelty infinitely worse than any ing them to tyranny, anarchy and chaos. that has ever been committed by our troops He held that the question of the govern in the Philippines ; worse to the victims and ment's policy was definitely approved by the far more brutalizing to those guilty of it. people at the last national election and that The men who fail to condemn these lynchthe minority should submit to that authori- ings and yet clamor about what has been tative verdict and help to carry it out in

done in the Philippines are indeed guilty of

For ne ch 7s, ate

lea aty leed

ip he

al ba

W JU ne or

ed

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HOW THE DEAD ARE BURIED AT MANILA. The Manila cemetery consists of two circular walls, about seven feet thick, pierced with holes, in which the coffins are placed. After a coffin has been deposited the hole is bricked up and faced with a memorial tablet. These graves are leased for five years, at the end of which, unless the lease is renewed, the coffins are taken out and the bones thrown into a pile just outside the wall. The walls of the cemetery are constructed of earth and rubble faced with stone, and the tropical rains soak through and rot ibe coffins. This method of burial dates back to the days of the domination of the Spanish Friars.

neglecting the beam in their own eye while interest. When that day shall come it is taunting their brother about the mote in not in human wisdom now to foretell." his. Understand me. These lynchings af In two other recent addresses the presiford us no excuse for failure to stop cruelty dent dwelt on the work of the army in the in the Philippines. Every effort is being Philippines and gave it high praise for its made and will be made to minimize the

courage, ability, and humanity. One was chances of cruelty occurring."

delivered before the Presbyterian General As to the nation's future policy toward Assembly in New York, May 20, and the the Philippines, the president said:

other at the celebration of the one hun"We believe that we can rapidly teach dredth anniversary of the National Milithe people of the Philippine islands not tary Academy at West Point, June 11. only how to enjoy but how to make good use of their freedom, and with their growing knowledge their growth in self-govern

Thus the question of present

Peace ment shall keep steady pace. When they

methods and

future govern

in the have thus shown their capacity for real

Philippines. ment for the Philippines is befreedom by their power of self-gov

ing thrashed out, but no one in ernment,

then, and not till then, will authority will go the length of outlining a it be possible to decide whether they final policy. An important contribution to are to exist independently of us or be knit the discussion comes from Manila in the to us by ties of common friendship and slape of a cablegram from Acting Governor

Filmino would be generally accepted with
satisfaction by the intelligent natives of
provincial and municipal governments es-
tablished by the native voters under the
limited suffrage laws that have been en-
acted, it is highly probable that the average
Filipino would find himself possessed of all
the independence that he cared for particu-
larly. There are one thousand American

Wright, bearing the date of May 23, but time and they are instructing the native
made public by the war department on June teachers in the English language and in
6. The acting governor reported that on the American methods of education. Governor
former date outside of the Moro country the Taft asserts that the people have returned
only portions of the archipelago notor to their peaceful occupations and that there
ganized under civil government were the is no secret insurrection boiling beneath
provinces of Lepanto, Bontoc, Batangas, the surface. While all the natives have a
Laguna, Principe and Infanta in Luzon, the friendly feeling toward the civil govern-
islands of Mindoro and Samar and some ment their sentiments toward the military
small and unimportant outlying groups. vary in the various districts according to
"No armed insurrection exists in any of the degree of tact which has been shown by
them," says General Wright. "There is no the commanding officers. L'nder an order
reason, so far as relates to peaceful condi of the secretary of war, dated May 31, the
tions, why civil government in all may not number of soldiers in the Philippines will
be now established." This is most gratify- be reduced at once from 31,700 to about
ing news. Wise management and the con-
tinued efforts of the American administra-
tion to improve conditions throughout the
islands should render the peace lasting.
That there is already a successful applica-
tion of civil government to nearly all the
important parts of the archipelago is reas-
onably certain from such credible testimony
as has been supplied recently.

Native
sentiment as it is expressed in organized
form by the so-called federal party asks
for annexation to the United States, lead-
ing in time to admission to the American
l'nion. This party recently sent to Wash-
ington Felipe Buencamino, formerly a cabi-
net officer in Aguinaldo's Malolos govern-
ment

, who makes the request for annexation as the party's spokesman. In a communication to the secretary of war regarding what may be done at once he says: “I recommend civil government, with

full powers for the reconstruction of the ruined government organisms of the Philippine people; a legislature composed of a high THE SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' MONUMENT DEDIand low chamber, in accordance with the CATED AT RIVERSIDE PARK, NEW YORK, ON provisions embodied in the bill reported by the committee to the house." It is reason

(From a photograph taken for THE WORLD TO-Day by

N. Lazarnick.)
able to believe that the house bill which is
thus warmly approved by this influential

25,000. With the withdrawal of the mili-
tary to central posts where they will not

come directly in touch with the natives, the islands if enacted into law.

With a

Governor Taft thinks all friction will disDopplar assembly to express the needs and appear. Americans must sincerely hope aspirations of the people, with delegates that he is not too sanguine and that an era of their own choosing in Washington, with of peace in the Philippines is dawning.

But what is to be ultimately Future the fate of the Philippines ? of the

While the sentiment in favor of Islands.

retaining them permanently is strong in many parts of the United States,

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BURIED AT MANILA. ont seren feet thick, pierced with holes, in which the coffins are ched up and faced with a memorial tablet. These graves are

is renewed, the cofins are taken out and the bones thrown into re constructed of earth and rubble faced with stone, and the od of burial dates back to the days of the domination of the

DECORATION DAY.

e interest. When that day shall come it is

not in human wisdom now to foretell." - In two other recent addresses the presi

dent dwelt on the work of the army in the

Philippines and gave it high praise for its e courage, ability, and humanity. One was

delivered before the Presbyterian General 1 Assembly in New York, May 20, and the

other at the celebration of the one hunh dredth anniversary of the National Viliet tary Academy at West Point, June 11.

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Thus the question of present
Peace methods and future govern-
in the
Philippines

, ment for the Philippines is be

ing thrashed out, but no one Il authority will go the length of outlining a

final policy. An important contribution to t the discussion comes from Manila in the 1 shape of a cablegram from Icting Governor

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