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ettle- their power to strengthen their lines and w he prevent the employment in their places of jf in- non-union men. On June 2 the extreme )nists measure was resorted to of calling out the vhich firemen, pumpmen and others whose imto be portant duty it was to keep the water se on pumped out of the mines. It is asserted

who that from 60 to 80 per cent of these men ; are obeyed the summons and went on strike

fail, The places of some of them were filled by bene- non-union men, mine superintendents and

others, but many of the pumps remaine

idle, to the enormous damage of mine prop of the erty. As the weeks went by there was in Le re creased bitterness against the mine owners scuss, and the men who refused to strike. Le t. the some of the mining communities large nu ed to bers of effigies were to be seen hangi ercial from trees and telegraph poles, bearing

e in- placards expressive of the anger felt against ?ment those who did not join in the struggle for

147,- higher wages. Some violence occurred and ad to there were threats on the part of the az y the thorities of calling out the militia to ke?

order. President Mitchell and other leal all in ers of the strikers threw their influence

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they are merely postponing the work and later. The public's sense of justice has of the coal road presidents, who decline to submit the quarrel with the mine workers President, ers consent to arbitration in

to the matter. Though the law has been re

EVENTS OF THE MONTH. OF THE MONTH.

PRESIDENT MITCHELL (x), HIS SECRETARY (XX) AND THE DISTRICT PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED against a sympathetic strike of the soft coal pealed which formerly authorized the presiminers in the western fields, all or most of dent to take action opening the way for the whom work under specific contracts. How- settlement of strike difficulties, Mr. Rooseever, a strike for better wages occurred in

velt made it known that he was ready to do the West Virginia coal fields, adding from

what he could unofficially to assist in seto 30,000 to the number of men vol curing industrial peace in the anthracite untarily quitting their employment in the region. He instructed the United States hope of improving their condition." The commissioner of labor. Carroll D. Wright, policy of keeping open during parts of the year mines that are closed at other times,

to investigate thoroughly the causes leading thus retaining in the coal fields more labor

to the strike and to embody them in an

Official report. This Mr. Wriglit proceeded than is needed to supply the demand for coal , tends to make labor cheap and entirely

to do. Through his efforts the correspondependent upon the whim of the half dozen

dence that passed between President Jitch

ell of the United line Workers and the men who control absolutely the anthracite presidents of the coal roads previous to the coal industry. Statistics as to the cost of the coal strike in lost wages are absurdly

strike was made public. It shows that the misleading, since the miners are never em

latter declined to enter into negotiations ployed throughout the vear and if they re

having to do with wages and conditions of fuse to work at one time in all probabile charge is made by the railway president that

labor generally in the anthracite field. The Wages, both of which will come to them

the influence of the union among the men

has tended to arouse a spirit of unrest and led it to condemn without stint the attitude

to decrease materially the efficiency of the labor furnished to the mines. The continuance for another rear of the advance of 10 per cent in wages granted to the men as a result of the strike of 1900 is pointed to

as a concession of value. Ilhat action, if Appeals to President Roose

ake in any; President Roosevelt would velt to urge that the mine own

the light of the report of the commissioner

of labor lar in the realm of conjecture duced him to give consideration

at the time of the completion of the latter official's labors, near the middle of

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June. Whether or not the coal roads in is constantly rising. In 1898 the number their dealings with one another and with of immigrants was 229,299; in 1899 it was the public violate the United States anti 311.715; in 1900 it was 448,572; in 1901 trust law is a subject for dispute aniong it was 487,918. The opening months of the well informed persons. Apparently the present year show such a heavy increase department of justice of the national over the immigration during the corresgovernment does not regard the combine's ponding period of last year that the figures operations as violations of the law. Still, for the entire twelve months are likely to the combine's methods of dealing with con be startlingly large. The growth is mainly sumers, independent mine owners and mine in immigration from Italy and the Slavonic workers are most exasperating and seem countries of southeastern Europe. Thouingly most unjust. If the president had sands of the newcomers are densely ignorsent the attorney general instead of the ant and entirely illiterate. Germany, Great commissioner of labor to investigate the Britain, Sweden, Norway and the other enaffairs of the coal roads the results might lightened nations which in the past have have been especially beneficial to the public. contributed so much by immigration to the

worthy citizenship of the 1

United States, show only small increases.

Ireland. in fact, discloses a inarked reduction, It was asserted by Mr. Shattuc, chairman of the house committee immigration, during the consideration of the immigration bill, that Canadian steamship agencies in Europe are advertising that they will carry to the United States those classes of inimigrants, such as paupers, that are not permitted to land at American ports. In view of all the facts the desirability of restricting immigration by a reasonable education test is clear. Degraded and ignorant

classes of aliens, with low THE BRITISH EMBASSY AT WASHINGTON, WHERE LORD PACNCEFOTE

standards of living and withDIED, MAY 24, 1902, (From a photograph taken for THE WORLD TO-DAY by Miss Frances B.

out the remotest knowledge Johnston)

of or sympathy for American

ideals of citizenship, when The National House of Rep- they enter this country by hundreds Restrict

resentatives has passed a bill of thousands annually, are a menace to the ing Immigration.

providing an education test for nation's institutions and a peril to the wel

immigrants and excluding fare of the American workingman, with aliens who cannot read or write in any lan whom they compete unfairly in the labor guage. That such legislation is desirable market. appears from a study of the immigration statistics of recent years and particularly of the past few months. Less than ten

After a debate lasting more

Bill to years ago, when the financial panic in this

than a week, the house of ren

Check country was at its height, large numbers of

Anarchy. resentatives on June 9 passed a foreigners who had been in the United

bill intended to check anarchy. States for a shorter or longer time crowded It imposes the death penalty on any one the steerage of ships bound for Europe, killing a president, vice president or other while immigration fell off enormously.

person entitled by law to succeed to the The return of prosperity has brought with presidency, or any diplomatic representait a vast flood of immigrants and that fiood tive of a foreign nation. Life imprison

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THE LATE LORD PAUXCEFOTE IN THE LIBRARY OF THE BRITISH EMBASSY AT WASHINGTON (SEE PAGE 1573.)

president which has passed the senate. The anarchistic ideas.

is constantly rising. In 1898 the number of immigrants was 229,299; in 189y it was 311,715; in 1900 it was 448,572; in 1901 it was 487,918. The opening months of the present year show such a heavy increase over the immigration during the corres: ponding period of last year that the figures for the entire twelve months are likely to be startlingly large The growth is mainly in immigration from Italy and the Slavonic countries of southeastern Europe. Thousands of the newcomers are densely ignorant and entirely illiterate. Germany, Creat Britain, Sweden, Norway and the other e1lightened nations which in the past have contributed so much by immigration to the

worthy citizenship of the United States, show only some increases. Ireland, in iac, discloses a marked reduction.

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mitted to enter the United States.
knowingly assisting an anarchist to enter
the country may receive a term of impris- domain of psychology than in that of jus-
onment or be fined heavily or hoth. Natu- tice. There is little or nothing to be gained
ralization is denied to any one who believes by taking the worthless life of a wretched

in anarchistic doctrines. The house bill has

(From a photograph taken for THE WORLD TO-Dar by Miss Frances B. Johnston.) ment is fixed as the punishment for in- latter provides, however, a bodyguard for flicting injuries that cause death, while er minds that do not prove fatal bring to the pears in the house bill. Sin earlier discuscriminal a term of imprisonment of five biors of the problem of safeguarding the ing another to assassinate any none of the nickinley it was deemed desirable by many persons named is held to be equally guilty to interpret any murderous attack upon a cating the assassination of an officer of this

of by . government, or an officer of any civilized

no matter whether bodily harm was actually nation, because of his official character, ren

inflicted or not. While there are serious ders one liable to a fine of not more than

objections to such a law, at least it would or imprisonment of not more than

have the possible advantage of notifying to entus vears or both. Immigrants opposed sassination that if the attempt were made

any person contemplating a president's asto organized government are not to be per

his own life would be forfeit even though Any one his intended victim escaped injury. How

ever, this whole subject lies rather in the

It was asserted by Mr. Shattuc, chairman of the house committee on immigration during the consideration of the immigration bill

, that Cama dian steamship agencies in Europe are advertising that they will carry to the U'nited States those classes of immigrants, such as paupers, that are not permitted to land at American ports

. In view of all the facts the desirability of restricting immigration by a reasonable education test is clear. Degraded and igneran

. classes of aliens, with lou standards of living and witt out the remotest knowleus of or sympathy for Americ

ideals of citizenship, they enter this country by hundrei of thousands annually, are a menace to the nation's institutions and a peril to the we fare of the American workingman, ut whom they compete un fairly in the labe market.

RD PAUNCEFOTE

Tiss Frances B.

$5.000

assassin. Whatever gain could come from

After a debate lasting more
Bill to
Check

than a week, the house of ren
Anarchy. resentatives on June 9 passed

bill intended to check anarch It imposes the death penalty on an killing a president

, vice president or other person entitled by law to succeed to the

presidency, or any diplomatic reprezinta I tive of a foreign nation. Life imprison

presiden han has a measure the protect the itse perfect in preventing the spread of

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Thronged London, with its King brilliant decorations and stately Edward's Coronation.ceremonies, has held the atten

tion of the world during the last days of June. King Edward's coronation in Westminster Abbey June 26 and the great procession through six or seven miles of streets June 27 marked the climax of the nation's festival. The latter display in the popular mind ranked with the solemn ceremonial of the preceding day, since few indeed, except foreign visitors of rank and peers of the kingdom, had an opportunity to witness the rites within the historic abbey. Perhaps two million spectators viewed the procession, which was a most impressive exhibition of the splendor and the resources of the British empire. All quarters of the earth contributed to this show of loyalty to the British monarch and patriotic devotion to the nation of which he is the constitutional ruler. That the effect on Britons, British colonists and the world at large, of the dazzling assemblage of colonial statesmen, subsidiary princes and armed men of every variety of uniform, language and complexion, must add stability to the throne which called it together, one can readily believe. Seeing is believing. Now the Briton knows by the testimony

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WESTMINSTER ABBEY. Where the Coronation Exercises were held.

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King Edward's

Thronged London, with its

brilliant decorations and stately Coronation. ceremonies, has held the atten

tion of the world during the last days of June. King Edward's coronation in Westminster Abbey June 26 and the great procession through six or seven miles of streets June 27 marked the climax of the nation's festival

. The latter display in the popular mind ranked with the solemn ceremonial of the preceding day, since few indeed, except foreign visitors of rank and peers of the kingdom, had an opportunity to witness the rites within the historic abbey. Perhaps two million spectators viewed the procession, which was a most impressive exhibition of the splendor and the resources of the British empire. Al quarters of the earth contributed to this show of loyalty to the British monarch and patriotic devotion to the nation of which he is the constitutional ruler. That the effect on Britons, British colonists and the world at large, of the dazzling assemblage of colonial statesmen, subsidiary princes and armed men of every variety of uniform, language and complexion, must add stability to the throne which called it together, one can readily believe. Seeing is believing Now the Briton knows by the testimony

of his own eyes that the British empire is immensely powerful and has its strong outposts on every continent. One of the interesting preliminaries to the coronation festivities was the action of King Edward and Queen Alexandra in becoming the guests at a dinner given by Ambassador Choate. This was the first time an English ruler had ever been the guest of the diplomatic representative of a foreign nation. If the coronation ceremonies and fetes are a triumph for King Edward and if the joy of the occasion is the British citizen's, whose eyes have feasted on marvels, doubtless the great and lasting results for the empire are being secured by the capable secretary of state for the colonies, Mr. Joseph Chamberlain, in his consultations with the colonial premiers who are now in London. Since the establishment of a national zollverein which shall bind together by close ties of commercial interest the colonies and the mother country is a dear ambition of Mr. Chamberlain's, it is to be supposed that the plan either will go forward or will receive a setback now

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KING EDWARD VII. AND PRINCE EDWARD OF

CORNWALL AND YORK.
(From a late photograph.)

that all parts of Greater Britain are represented by their leading statesmen around the council board. If out of these consultations shall come preferential duties on imports, of which the new bread tax may be the germ, those who have kept watch of British latter day statesmanship will not be greatly surprised.

In the midst of the coronation British

festivities and the rejoicings Political Stirrings.

over peace in South Africa, the

leaders of the sadly divided Liberal party are pulling themselves together and preparing for aggressive work. While the attention of the ministry is fixed, rather more closely than may be good for affairs at its center, on conditions prevailing at the circumference of the empire, the opposition leaders think they see light ahead for their cause. The Westminster Gazette thus sums up the situation from the Liberal point of view: “We have a government which came to power eighteen months ago

HAIRS IN WESTMINSTER ABBEY. Edward VII. at bis Coronation. It has been used at the for 60 years. Under the chair is seen the famous stone owned. It was brought to England by Edward I. in 1296. crowned, was made for Queen Mary in 1689, and was last

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