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THE WORLD TO-DAY

A Monthly Encyclopedic Record of Progress

CONTAINING THE LATEST INFORMATION

ON

History

Politics
Science

Industry
Philosophy

Religion
Literature

Education
Legislation

Art, Etc.

PREPARED BY A NATIONAL STAFF OF CONTRIBUTORS

FULLY ILLUSTRATED

A NEW IDEA-What is said of it

“THE OUTLOOK," New York: “We commend the idea, and we commend also

the thoroughness and care with which the articles have been prepared." “THE STANDARD," Chicago: “We do not see how any wide-awake person can

get along without it.” “THE INDEPENDENT," New York: "The idea of this magazine is a good one

and we look to see it fill a long felt want." "THE FOURTH ESTATE,” New York: "A single glance through its pages is

sufficient to demonstrate its usefulness to all who are interested in

important happenings,” “THE TRIBUNE," Chicago: "This publication is becoming of greater value

every month." “THE AMERICAN," Nashville: "A publication which no man of affairs can get along without

The work is not issued in haphazard fashion, but every detail shows the most painstaking attention.

The mechanical work is a marvel of taste and care, and the fine paper and clear type used make it a delight to the eye.”

**

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LOOKING UP THE MALL TOWARD THE CAPITOL FROM THE MONUMENT GARDEN, DRAWN BY CHARLES GRAHAM FROM THE PLANS

ON THE WASHINGTON COMMISSION. (A SAMPLE ILLUSTRATIox.)

FOR EVERYTHING NEW CONSULT

THE WORLD TO-DAY

THE ONLY PUBLICATION KEEPINO PACE WITH THE WORLD'S PROGRESS

A NEW IDEA EMBODYING THE VERY SPIRIT

OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.

The World To-Day is a monthly publication containing the very latest information in every department of human progress.

History, Politics, Science, Industry, Literature, Art, Education, Philosophy and Religion are a few of the departments treated regularly by specialists.

The weekly

Nothing Like It, The daily record of current events appears in the leading newspapers of the large cities. The metropolitan daily is a mirror of the world, and it renders the reading public an indispensable service. and the monthly also have their place. With their reports of recent occurrences they give a more or less complete history of what is going on in the world. The bi-monthly and quarterly reviews furnish condensed chronicles of passing evenis, with articles on special topics of interest only to a limited circle of readers. Some of the reviews afford glimpses of home and foreign affairs, with brief notes on science, art and literature.

Their outlook is necessarily circumscribed, for each has a limited field to cover. The province of a scientific journal is not politics

, and the religious paper can give only incidental attention to public questions. The range of no periodical can be universal.

As a result of this multiplication of papers and magazines, it is impossible for the busy man to keep track of human advancement.

In the Middle Ages an intellectual giant like Dante could master the learning of his time, but now scholars must specialize.

Business and professional men, too, find it necessary to confine themselves to a particular line of work. While the successful man of to-day must know one thing thoroughly, he must have ready access to knowledge on a vast variety of subjects.

Handy works of reference are indispensable, not only to the teacher, the clergyman and the lawyer, but to the financier and the farmer.

Compilations of facts are the tools of every thinking man.

The ancients got along with few books and no periodicals. The time has come when every citizen ought to keep in touch with public affairs.

We cannot.

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RUSSELL STURGIS, A.M., Ph.D.

ART. ARCHITECTURE
Editor Art Department Century Dictionary," " Universal Encyclopedia," etc,
A, C. TRUE

AGRICULTURE
Director U. s. orice of Experimeni stations, Washington, D. c.'

ANTHROPOLOGY
GEORGE A. DORSEY, Ph.D.

Curator Field Columbian Musiem, Chicago.
W. J. McGEE

ANTHROPOLOGY
Bureau of American Ethnology, Washington, D. c.'

ARCHAEOLOGY (Egypt)
WILLIAM C. WINSLOW, Ph.D., D.C.L., LL.D.

Vice-President Egypt Exploration Fund, Boston.
ARTHUR FAIRBANKS, Ph.D.

ARCHAEOLOGY
Professor of Greek, Eniversity of Iowa.

ASTRONOMY
HERBERT A. HOWE, A.M., Sc.D.
Director Chamberlin Observatory, University of Denver.

BOTANY
JOHN M. COULTER, A.M., Ph.D.
Professor of Botany, University of Chicago.

DRAMA
LYMAN B. GLOVER
Dramatic and Musical Critic, Chicago Recora-Herald."'

ECONOMICS
F. SPENCER BALDWIN, Ph.D., R.P.D.

Professor of Political Economy and Social Science, Boston Üriversity.
0. P. AUSTIN

ECONOMICS
Chief Bureau of Statistics, Treasury Dept., Washington, D. c.'
W. M. DANIELS, A.M.

ECONOMICS (Finance)
Professor of Economics, Princeton University.
WILLIAM F. WILLOUGHBY, Ph.D.

ECONOMICS (Labor)
Treasurer of Porto Rico: (Formerly U. s. Dept. of Labor).
EDWARD W. BEMIS, Ph.D.

ECONOMICS (Municipal Questions)
Cleveland, Ohio.
EDWARD D. JONES, Ph.D.

ECONOMICS (Resources and Industries)
School of Commerce, University of Michigan.
ROLAND P. FALKNER, Ph.D.

ECONOMICS (Resources and Industries)
Library of Congress (ex-Prof. of Finance and Economics, University of Pennsylvania).
R. H. THURSTON, C.E., Ph.B., LL.D.

ENGINEERING
Director Sibley College; Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Cornell University.
HENRY H. NORRIS, M.E.

ENGINEERING
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, Sibley College, Cornell University.
HENRY GANNETT

GEOGRAPHY
Geographer 0. s. Geological Survey, Washington, D.C.
P. H. NEWELL

GEOLOGY
Hydrographer U.'s. Geological Survey, washington, D. c.
LESTER F. WARD

GEOLOGY (Fossil Plants)
United States Geological Survey, Washington, D. c.
EVARTS B. GREENE, Ph.D.

HISTORY
Professor of History, University of Minois.
H. W. CALDWELL, A.M., Ph.B.

HISTORY
Professor of American History, University of Nebraska.
FRANK STRONG, Ph.D.

HISTORY
President University of Oregon.
L. H. BAILEY

HORTICULTURE
Professor of Horticuliure, Cornell University.
B. F. SHAMBAUGH, A.M., Ph.D.

LAW (Constitutional)
Professor of Political science, University of Iowa.
ADOLPH MOSES

LAW (Corporation)
Editor National Corporation Reporter."
ISAAC N. DEMMON, A.M.

LITERATURE
Professor of English and Rhetoric, University of Michigan.'
CHARLES W. PEARSON, A.M.

LITERATURE
Ex-Professor of English Literature, Northwestern University.
FREDERICK M. WARREN, Ph.D.

LITERATURE
Professor of "Romance Languages, Adelbert College.

LITERATURE
Critical Staff, "The Dial.''
FINLEY ELLINGWOOD, A.M., M.D.

MEDICINE SURGERY
Editor "The Medical Times."
JESSE MACY, M.A., LL.D.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
Professor of Political Science, Iowa College.
W. W. WILLOUGHBY, Ph.D.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
Associate Professor of Political Science, Johns Hopkins University.

RELIGION Ex-Pres. 11. Wesleyan University.

SOCIOLOGY Professor of Sociology, Cornell University:

ZOOLOGY Professor of Zoology, University of Michigan.

ZOOLOGY Author of "introduction to the Study of zoology," etc.'

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WALLACE RICE

SAMUEL FALLOWS, D.D., LL.D.
H. H. POWERS, Ph.D.
JACOB REIGHARD, Ph.B.

N. A. HARVEY

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