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BY JOSEPH BREVARD,
One of the Judges of the Courts of General Sessions and Common Pleas, and on
Associate Judge of the Constitutional Court of Appeals of the

State of South-Carolina.

VOL. I.

CHARLESTON, (S. C.)

PUBLISHED BY JOHN HOFF, No. 117, BROAD-STREET.

1814.

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L. S.

District of South-Carolina, to wit:

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the twentieth day of September, Anno Domini, mung

one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, and in the thirty-ninth year of the Independence of the United States of America, JOHN Hory has

deposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof he claims Hmm as proprietor, in the words following, to wit:

* An Alphabetical Digest of the Public Statute Law of South-Carolind. In Three

Volumes. By Joseph Brevard, one of the Judges of the Courts of General Sessions and Common Pleas, and an Associate Judge of the Constitutional

Court of Appeals of the State of South-Carolina.In conformity to the act of Congress of the United States, entitled “ An act for s's the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and books, " to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mention"ed:” and also an act, entitled “ An act supplementary to an act, entitled . An " act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and “ books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein * mentioned,' and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving " and etching historical and other prints."

JAMES JERVEY, Clerk of the District of South-Carolina,

TO THE

PEOPLE OF SOUTH-CAROLINA.

FELLOW CITIZENS,

THE laws which you have established for your own security and advantage, and to regulate the conduct of each one of you in society, have been collected and digested for your convenient use, accompanied with explanatorý notes, designed to render the perusal and study of them more interesting and instructive: and they are now presented for your acceptance.

In every well constituted republican government, the laws are supreme. Law is the expression of the public will, and flows immediately from the fountain of all power, THE PEOPLE.

The majesty of the people exists in their laws, at the head of which stands the supreme law, THE CONSTITUTION.

In such a government, the law is the only sovereign. The fundamental principle of all law, is the PUBLIC GOOD; and it is the duty and interest of each individual member of the social state, to promote the greatest good of the greatest number, by all the legitimate means within his reach.

One of these means is the promulgation and explanation of those rules of action which have been instituted for the equal benefit of each individual ; and teaching obedience and respect for those institutions in which the sovereignty of the people resides, and on which their security and happiness depend.

With these sentiments, this work is vespectfully inscribed by

THE PUBLISHER

Charleston, September 20, 1814,

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