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Mortality Among Children, Week Ending January 18, 1913.
Under 1 Year of Age.

Under 5 Years of Age.
Diarrhaal Diseases.

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Rate per
1,000 Births.

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1,000 Living.

Diseases.
Diarrhaal

Rate per 1,000

Living.

Diseases. *Epidemic

Rate per

1,000 Living

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* Includes Small Pox, Measles, Scarlet Fever, Diphtheria and Whooping Cough, Deaths According to Cause, Annual Rate per 1,000 and Age, with Meterology and

Number of Deaths in Public Institutions for 13 Weeks.

Week Ending

Oct
19

Oct.'Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Dec. Dec.
26. 2. 9. 16.

23.

30. 7. I.

Dec. Dec. Jan. | Jan. Jan.
21.
28 .

II.

18.

Total deaths... 1,243 1,238 1,149 1,302 1,216 1,354 1,250 1,420 / 1,333 1,481 1,403. 1,519 1,512 1,:46 Annual death

} 12.53

12.48 11.55 13.13 12.26 13.65 12.62 14.32 13.44 14.93 14.15 14.75 14.68 15.01

rate.......

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Mean barometer. 30.03 29.85 29.86 29.97 29.87 29.91 29.93 30.02 29.96 29.81 29.93 129.69 30.16 30.19 Mean humidity.. 59. 74.9 62. 63.6 63.6 55.3

71.7 152.9 64.9 66.4 68. 74.6 71.9 Inches of rain

3.79in .Soin 2.26in .28in. 1.99in.65in or Snow....

.72in 1335in 2.33in .72in. .78in Mean tempera

ture (Fahr- 57.90 56.4° 54.40 151.69 51.70 18.30 '40.19 48.o 33.4° 41.1° 33.6 43.6° 39.90 +1.99

enheit)..... Maximum temperature 72.o 69.o 172.o

67.

55.0 64.0 46. 151. 144. 57. 58. 63.° (Fahrenheit) Minimum temperature

30.° 18.° 118.9 (Fahrenheit)

72.°

66.

47.° 37. 31.o
35.o 32.°

18.
32.°

40.0

o

28.0

34.

24.0

DIRECTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

OFFICES
Headquarters: S. W. Corner Centre and Walker Streets, Borough of Manhattan

Telephone, 6280 Franklin
Borough of The Bronx, 3731 Third Avenue,

Telephone, 1975 Tremont Borough of Brooklyn, Flatbush Avenue and Willoughby Street,

Telephone, 4720 Main Borough of Queens, 372-374 Fulton Street, Jamaica, L. I.

Telephone, 1200 Jamaica Borough of Richmond, 514-516 Bay Street, Stapleton, S. I.

Telephone, 440 Tompkinsville Office Hours-9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 12 m.

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Brooklyn 1. 268 South 2d St.

7. 359 Manhattan Ave. 13. 651 Manhattan Ave. 19. 2. 660 Fourth Ave.

8. 104 President St.

14.

185 Bedford Ave. 20. 3. 208 Hovt St.

9. 698 Leonard St. 15. 296 Bushwick Ave. 21. 4. 325 Hudson Ave. 10. 233 Suydam St. 16. 994 Flushing Ave. 22. 5. 721 Glenmore Ave. 11. 329 Osborne St.

17. 176 Nassau St. 23. 6. 184 Fourth Ave.

12. 126 Dupont St. 18. 129 Osborn St. 24. The Bronx-1. 511 East 149th Street. 2. 1354 Webster Avenue.

698 Henry St.
303 Williams Ave.
167 Hopkins St.
604 Park Ave.
239 Graham Ave.
1597 Pitkin Ave.

Queens-1.

114 Fulton Avenue, Astoria, L. I.

Richmond-1.

689 Bay Street, Stapleton, S. I.

1

TUBERCULOSIS CLINICS
Manhattan-West Side Clinic, 307 West 33d Street. Telephone, 3171 Murray Hill.

East Side Clinic, 81 Second Street. Telephone, 5586 Orchard.
Harlem Italian Clinic, 420 East 116th Street. Telephone, 5584 Harlem.
Southern Italian Clinic, 22 Van Dam Street. Telephone, 412 Spring.

Day Camp, Ferryboat " Middletown,” foot of East 91st Street. Telephone, 2957 Lenox.
The Bronx--Northern Clinic, St. Pauls Place and Third Avenue. Telephone, 1975 Tremont.

Southern Clinic, 493 East 139th Street. Telephone, 5702 Melrose.
Brooklyn-Main Clinic, Fleet and Willoughby Streets. Telephone, 4720 Main.

Germantown Clinic, 55 Sumner Avenue. Telephone, 3228 Williamsburg.
Brownsville Clinic, 362 Bradford Street. Telephone, 2732 East New York,
Eastern District Clinic, 306 South 5th Street, Williamsburg: , Telephone, 1293 Williamsburg.

Da; Camp, Ferryboat "Rutherford," foot of Fulton St. Tel., 1530 Main.
Queens---- Jamaica Clinic, 10 Union Avenue, Jamaica. Telephone, 1386 Jamaica.
Richmond-Richmond Clinic, Bay and Elizabeth Streets, Stapleton. Telephone, 440 Tompkins.

CLINICS FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN
Manhattan-Gouverneur Slip. Telephone, 2916 Orchard.

Pleasant Avenue and 118th Street. Telephone, 972 Harlem. Brooklyn--330 Throop Avenue. . Telephone, 5319 Williamsburg.

124 Lawrence Street. Telephone, 5623 Main.

1219 Herkimer Street. Telephone, 2684 East New York. The Bronx-580 East 169th Street. Telephone, 2558 Tremont.

HOSPITALS Manhattan-Willard Parker Hospital, foot of East 16th Street. Telephone, 1600 Stuyvesant. The Bronx-Riverside Hospital, North Brother Island. Telephone, 1000 Melrose. Brooklyn-Kingston Avenue Hospital, Kingston Avenue and Fenimore Street. Telephone, 4100 Flatbush.

SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS Otisville, Orange County, N. Y. (via Erie Railroad from Jersey City). Telephone. 13 Otisville.

LABORATORIES
Diagnosis Laboratory, Centre and Walker Streets. Telephone, 6280 Franklin.
Research Laboratory.

Chemical Laboratory: Vaccine Laboratory. Drug Laboratory.
Foot of East Sixteenth Street. Telephone, 1600 Stuyvesant.

TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL ADMISSION BUREAU
Maintained by the Department of Health, the Department of Public Charities, and Bellevue and Allied

Hospitals, 426 First Avenue. Telephone, 8607 Madison Square. Hours 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

M. B. BROWN PRINTING & BINDING CO.

49 TO 57 PARK PLACE, NEW YORK

522-A-13 (B) 2000

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Report for Week Ending January 25, 1913

The PUBLIC AND THE New MILK REGULATIONS. A circular which has recently been issued by the department calls attention to the different grades of milk which are permitted to be sold in New York City and describes the purposes for which the various grades may properly be used. The importance of obtaining a pure milk supply for a large city can hardly be overestimated, not only from the viewpoint of the nutritive value of the milk, but also on account of the danger of transmission of a number of diseases through this medium. The circular which follows will be supplied in quantity to associations or individuals volunteering to assist in its distribution. The Department wishes to disseminate this information as widely as possible in order that all citizens may avail themselves to the fullest possible extent of the protection afforded by the recent improvements in the official control of New York's milk supply.

"ADVICE TO THE PUBLIC ON THE USE OF MILK. “The rules and regulations of the Department of Health require that all milk, whether in bottles or cans, shall be labeled with the grade for which a permit has been issued.

"The rules and regulations relating to the sale of milk will be sent to anyone on application. By calling at the Department any person may obtain information as to the grade of milk each dealer in the City is permitted to sell.

“The Department should be informed whenever these regulations are not complied with.

"Plan for Milk Grading. “Grade A. Suitable for infants and children-This grade of milk is sold only in bottles, the caps of which must be marked 'Grade A.' This grade comprises certified milk, guaranteed milk, inspected milk raw and selected milk pasteurized.

“Grade B. Suitable for adults—This grade may be sold in bottles or cans, caps and tags of which must be marked "Grade B.' in large, green letters on a white ground. This grade comprises pasteurized milk and selected milk raw.

"Grade C. Suitable for cooking purposes only-Must be plainly marked in red letters 'Grade C. for cooking. From the sanitary standpoint, this is the poorest grade of milk that is permitted to be sold and should never be used for babies or children. All milk stores selling Grade C. will be required to display a placard so stating.

“Pasteurized milk of either grade must be plainly labeled 'pasteurized.' Pasteurized milk is considered by the Department safer than raw milk of the same grade.

"Whenever milk is sold for immediate use by adults, as in restaurants, hotels, clubs, bakeries, lunch counters, dairies, it must be either Grade A or Grade B quality.

"Whenever possible, bottled milk should be purchased so that the quality may be known from the label. This holds true when milk is bought for the family or when used at the table in hotels, restaurants or similar places.

"Advice to Mothers. "It is advised that Grade A milk only be used for infants. In case Grade B milk must be used, the pasteurized is the safer. If Grade B raw milk must be used, it should be first pasteurized or boiled in the household.

“Grade C milk should never be used for infants. If you cannot obtain Grade A milk from your dealer, apply to the nearest infant's milk station, a list of which is published.

"This information is promulgated by order of the Board of Health." APPLICATION OF OSTEOPATHS FOR AMENDMENT OF SECTION 103a, SANITARY CODE.

A hearing was held before the Board of Health at its meeting on Tuesday, the 21st inst., upon the application of Guy Wendell Burns, Chairman, Board of Directors, Osteopathic Society of The City of New York, on behalf of the practicing osteopaths of the City, for the amendment of the Sanitary Code, whereby certificates of death

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signed by osteopaths might be accepted and burial or transit permits granted thereon. The New York Osteopathic Society, the New York County Medical Society, the Kings County Medical Society, and the Queens-Nassau County Medical Society were represented. Arguments pro and con were heard from 3:30 until 6 p. m. Commissioner Lederle announced that a decision would be given in two weeks.

Previous to the passage of chapter 344 of the Laws of 1907, the practice of oesteopathy was not recognized in this State. By the passage of this law, it was so recognized, and subsequent to the refusal of the Department of Health to register signatures of osteopaths with it, a writ of mandamus was issued by Justice Aspinall

, compelling the Department of Health to register their signatures in accordance with the provisions of that act, and that the word "osteopath” be included in such registration. On March 31, 1909, the Board of Health amended the Sanitary Code by the addition of the following sub-section, known as section 163a :

“Sec. 163a. No transit permit shall be granted for the removal or burial of the remains of any person who may have died in The City of New York, unless a certificate of death, made out upon a blank form furnished by this Department, and signed by a physician upon whom has been conferred the degree of Doctor of Medicine, be filed in the Bureau of Records of this Department."

A representative osteopath sought to enjoin the enforcement of this section of the Sanitary Code. The Corporation Counsel of the City entered a demurrer, which was sostained. Hon. Justice Putnam handed down a decision from which the following may be quoted :

"While the State has wisely allowed the practice of osteopathy, it does not follow that it thereby holds out one without any practice in surgery or experience in prescribing drugs as fully qualified to certify the cause of death. Indeed, it is not certain that a board of health would be compelled to take the certificate of death of all licensed physicians in the event of an epidemic or the spread of some new and mysterious disease. Granted that the theoretical education of the osteopath is of a standard equal to that of a doctor of medicine, after he enters on his profession his practice is restricted, so that it does not appear that he can make the tests by examination of blood and tissues by which alone many diseases can be certainly detected. The Sanitary Code is discriminatory, but the discrimination is not personal and arbitrary. It is based on a limitation which the osteopath may be said to make for himself, and deprives him of no rights which he ought to exercise, consistent with the public safety.”

Death FOLLOWING THE REMOVAL OF TONSILS AND ADENOIDS. On January 23d, an article appeared in the “New York World” describing the death of Julius Reif, thirteen years of age, of 493 Wendover ave., a pupil of Public School No. 42, and stating that his death, which occurred on January 16, was the result of an operation for the removal of enlarged tonsils and adenoids, the operairon having been advised by the representatives of the Department of Health. The death of a child in consequence of such an operation, which is usually regarded as trivial and involving no especial danger, is regrettable enough, and especially so in the case of a boy 13 years of age who, as described by the “World,” had evinced such creditable evidences of good scholarship. Some of the statements, however, in the article referred to, are inaccurate in so far at least as the Department of Health was concerned. The facts are as follows:

The boy was examined on the 12th of November in Public School No. 42 by a medical inspector of the Department, and it may be mentioned that the Inspector in question is considered one of the best and most conservative men on the staff. The Inspector noted that the boy was suffering from defective nasal breathing, and stated, as his records of the case show, that the obstruction was due to a deviated septum, that is to say, to a malposition of the partition which separates one nostril from the other. He did not note the occurrence of adenoids or hypertrophied tonsils, and his case record makes no mention of their existence. Following this diagnosis,'a Nurse írom the Department called at the home of the parents November 23d and advised that the boy be taken to the family physician for advice and treatment. She said nothing about operative procedures for, as the result of her past experience in such cases, she did not believe that a boy of this age would be operated upon for the correction ví a deviated septum. She called again November 30th, but made no reference to any operation, and at neither of these two visits was anything said about enlarged tonsils or adenoids. Her third and last visit was made on the 27th of December, when she was told that the boy had been operated upon in the Fordham Hospital for adenoids and hypertrophied tonsils. On the 2d and 13th of January, a Nurse from the Department visited the boy's home in order to make inquiries in regard to his condition. He was finally taken to the Harmoriah Hospital, where he is said to have died on the

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