Page images
PDF
EPUB

every part of said animal, including the hide, shall be tanked and destroyed. Retaining rooms shall be rat-proof, large enough for carcasses to hang separately, furnished with abundant light, and provided with suitable tables and other necessary apparatus ; the floors shall be of cement, asphalt, metal or brick laid in cement, and shall have proper sewer connections. Wagons, cars or other vehicles used in transporting meat through the City shall be so closed and covered that the contents shall be free from dust, dirt and flies. Persons affected with tuberculosis or any other communicable disease, shall not be employed in any of the departments where carcasses are dressed, meat is handled, or meat food products are prepared. Upon all carcasses slaughtered under the supervision of the Department of Health which have passed inspection there shall be placed a meat inspection stamp, and no such stamp shall be placed upon meat or meat food products except under the supervision of an Inspector of this Department.

Proprietors of abattoirs, shall, upon the completion of each day's operations, furnish to the Inspector detailed to said abattoir statements containing accurate information in regard to the number and kind of animals slaughtered and the weight of the meat produced therefrom. Hides, feet, offal and dressed carcasses must not be allowed to accumulate on the killing floor. The owner, or person in charge of each slaughter house, shall inform the Inspector detailed thereto when work for the day has been concluded, and when slaughtering will next take place.

In all slaughter houses established after January 1, 1913, all water closets, toilet rooms and dressing rooms shall be entirely separated from apartments in which carcasses are dressed or meat or meat food products are cured, stored, packed, handled or prepared. In slaughter houses which were established prior to January 1, 1913, where such rooms open into apartments in which meat or meat food products are handled, they must be provided with properly ventilated vestibules with doors which close automatically.

Water closets and toilet rooms shall be conveniently located, sufficient in number, ample in size, and fitted with fixtures which have been approved by the Department of Health. The lavatories shall adjoin the water closet apartment, but shall not be in the same room or apartment. These rooms shall be properly lighted, suitably ventilated, and kept inoffensive at all times. They shall be provided with running hot and cold water, soap, individual towels and toilet paper.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Report for Week Ending February 22, 1913

The Board of Health has adopted several resolutions embodying requirements in regard to foods in addition to the new provisions on this subject described in the Weekly Bulletin of February 15. This is in continuance of a definite program planned by the Commissioner of Health for the radical improvement of the Sanitary Code and the regulations of the Department of Health in relation to foods and food supplies. The latest resolutions relate to vegetables, eggs and cream. A resolution has also been adopted with the object of preventing nuisances caused by the carting of fat or trimmings of meat or bones or the storing of such material in butcher shops, markets, restaurants or hotels.

WORMY VEGETABLES. The first of the new resolutions amends section 42 of the Sanitary Code to include wormy vegetables among foods classified as “unsound" and forbidden to be offered for sale or sold for food anywhere in New York City. A recent prosecution by the Department of Health, brought under this section of the Sanitary Code in its old form,' failed on account of a doubt on the part of the Judges as to whether "wormy" vegetables could be considered unwholesome and unfit for human food. The present amendment of the code should obviate such a contingency in the future by prohibiting the sale of "wormy” vegetables as such. Nuts, figs and dates as such or in candy are especially aimed at in this provision, and are for this purpose classed as vegetables. The amended section reads as follows:

Section 42. No meat, vegetables or milk, not being then healthy, fresh, sound, wholesome or safe for human food or the meat of any animal that died by disease or accident, shall be brought into The City of New York or held, kept, offered for sale or sold for such food anywhere in said City; nor shall any such food, substance or articles be kept or stored therein. The term "meat” as herein used shall include fish, birds, eggs and fowl; the term "vegetables” shall include any product, substance or article used as and for human food other than milk or meat; the term "not sound” shall include any vegetable that is wormy, and all wormy vegetables, when used or intended for use as herein mentioned, are prohibited. For the purpose of this section, any meat, vegetables or milk in possession of, or held, kept or offered for sale by, a dealer in food, shall prima facie be deemed to be held, kept and offered for sale as human food.

SPOT Eggs. Section 48a of the Sanitary Code was amended to prohibit entirely the sale of any eggs known as "spots" or "spot eggs,” which term is defined to mean all unsound eggs. For the past two years the sale of "spot eggs” has been permitted provided the cases were plainly labeled, so that such eggs should not be used for food purposes, but, even with this precaution, it was found that abuses arose, and it was considered possible for unscrupulous dealers to ship “spot eggs," properly labeled, outside the city and there use them for food purposes. While the Department of Health is primarily concerned with the conditions in the City of New York, it naturally wishes to prevent such imposition on the citizens of other communities, and therefore stringent requirement has now been enacted which will mean that all "spot eggs” will be immediately denatured wherever found by the Inspectors. “Denaturing" spot eggs makes it impossible to use them in food, but leaves it still possible to utilize them legitimately for manufacturing purposes. The following is the section as amended :

Section 48a. No person shall break out eggs for sale or conduct the business of breaking out eggs to be canned, frozen, dried or used in any other manner in the City of New York, and no eggs broken from the shell, whether canned, frozen, dried or treated in any other manner, shall be received, held, kept, sold, offered for sale or delivered in the City of New York without a permit from the Board of Health and subject to the conditions thereof, and subject also to the rules and regulations adopted by the said Board of Health.

(a) No person shall receive, hold, keep, sell or offer for sale or deliver, as or for food, or to be used in food, in the City of New York, any canned, frozen or dried eggs, or eggs broken from the shell, which are adulterated or to which has been added any poisonous ingredient or any ingredient which may render such eggs injurious to health, or to which has been added any antiseptic, preservative or foreign substance not evident and not known to the purchaser or consumer, or which shall contain filthy, decomposed or putrid animal matter.

(b) No person shall receive, hold, keep, sell or offer for sale or deliver in the City of New York any eggs known as "spots" or "spot eggs.”

The term "spots" and "spot eggs," when used herein, means all unsound eggs, including those affected by moulds, partly decomposed, broken yolked, blood ringed or veined, partially hatched, sour, or eggs the shells of which are so broken or cracked that the contents are leaking therefrom.

New REQUIREMENTS FOR CREAM. The important improvements in the sanitary control of the milk supply of New York, which have been effected by the gradual development of the program of compulsory pasteurization and the grading of milk during the past three years, have not until now been applied to cream as such, as it was deemed essential to deal first with the far greater problem of the milk supply. A resolution of the Board of Health now requires that after July 1, 1913, no cream shall be brought into the City or sold here unless it is produced from either Grade A or Grade B milk or is itself pasteurized. No cream shall be sold in the City unless it complies with the standard and is prepared as required by the rules and regulations of the Department of Health, nor shall any cream be used in the preparation of food in this City unless it complies with such standard and regulations. The exact wording of the resolution is as follows:

Whereas, The protection of the public health requires that cream shall be derived either from milk that is produced under satisfactory conditions or from pasteurized milk, or is itself pasteurized, therefore, be it

Resolved, That after July 1, 1913, no cream shall be brought into the City or held, kept or offered for sale unless it is produced from either Grade A milk or Grade B milk, or is itself pasteurized; and be it further

Resolved, That no cream shall be sold in this City unless it complies with the standard and is prepared as required by the rules and regulations of the Department of Health; and be it further

Resolved. That no cream shall be used in any preparation of food in this City unless it is of the standard and complies with the rules and regulations of the Department of Health.

CARTING OF Shop FAT. In the belief that the storing of "shop" fat or trimmings of meat or bones in butcher shops, markets, restaurants or hotels, and the carting of "shop" fat and bones and the rendering of such material in the built-up, portions of the City is liable to cause a nuisance, and believing that it is the obligation of all cities, so far as possible, to dispose of the offensive waste material of the community within the City limits, the Board of Health has adopted a resolution prohibiting the keeping of offensive fats, rimmings of meat and bones in butcher shops or markets, restaurants or hotels. The resolution also provides that on and after May 1, 1913, the bringing into The City of New York of green (fresh) bones and fat shall be prohibited, except that such fats as are wholly and exclusively used for the preparation of edible products may be brought into the City under a permit of the Board of Health and subject to its rules and regulations. The prohibition does not apply to dry and inoffensive bones brought into the City for the purpose of manufacture. The following is the resolution in full:

Whereas, The storing of "shop" fat or trimmings of meat or bones in butcher shops, markets, restaurants or hotels is liable to cause a nuisance, and

Whereas, Carting of shop fat and such bones in the City is the cause of a nuisance, and

Whereas, The rendering of shop fat and bones in the built-up portions of the City is the cause of a nuisance, and

Whereas, This Board recognizing the obligations of the City to dispose of, as far as it is possible, the offensive waste materials of the City, within the limits of the City, is of the opinion that the bringing into the City of materials which are themselves offensive or which are the cause of nuisance in the subsequent preparation of manufacture should be forbidden, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the keeping of offensive fats, trimmings of meat and bones in butcher shops or markets, restaurants or hotels is hereby prohibited, and on and after May 1, 1913, the bringing into The City of New York of the following materials is prohibited: Green (fresh) bones; fat, except that such fats as are wholly and exclusively used for the preparation of edible products may, under a permit of this Board and subject to its rules and regulations, be brought into the City for the purposes mentioned. The prohibition herein contained shall not apply to dry and inoffensive bones brought into the City for the purpose of manufacture.

« PreviousContinue »