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REVISED ORDINANCES

WITH THE CONSTITUTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES AND OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI;
THE VARIOUS CHARTERS OF, AND LAWS APPLICABLE TO THE

TOWN AND CITY OF ST. LOUIS.

PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE CITY COUNCIL, UNDER THE SUPERINTENDENCE OF

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This volume contains the ordinances of the city of St. Louis, “ of a public, general, and permanent nature,” in force on the 31st of July, 1850. It has been compiled and published in conformity with the provisions of “ An ordinance in relation

nance amendatory thereto, approved, July 31, 1850, vide page 320, et. seq.

As erroneous views are entertained by many in regard to the powers and duties of the Reviser, I deem it proper, and as a matter of justice to myself, to make the following explanatory statement, by which it will be seen that the power to enact or adopt ordinances, belongs to the City Council, and not to the Reviser.

By the terms and provisions of an ordinance entitled “ An ordinance providing for the revision of existing ordinances,” approved, December 24, 1849, it was made the duty of the Reviser and his assistant, to report to the City Council a complete revision and digest of the ordinances of the city, of a general, public and permanent character, embracing in one ordinance, as far as practicable, all existing provisions relating to the same subject. This was done. Some of the ordinances thus reported were adopted -- others were materially changed, or different provisions substituted — while others were not adopted, in consequence of disagreement between the Boards of Aldermen and Delegates.

While the ordinances were in course of preparation for publication, after the adjournment of the Council in April last, an incongruity was discovered which rendered it impossible to publish the ordinances in the manner required by the City Council. In order to remedy this difficulty the Reviser was directed to suspend the publication of the ordinances until the further order of the City Council, and was also directed to report the “necessary ordinances to muke the revision complete.

The Reviser complied with the orders of the City Council; but, as was the case in the first instance, some of the ordinances lastly reported, were adopted; others were materially changed, and some of them were not adopted by reason of the disagreement of the Boards of Aldermen and Delegates. The difficulty, therefore, was but partially removed by direct legislation. An ordinance was adopted, however, which enabled the Reviser, and made it his duty, to digest and publish the existing ordinances, in force at the time of its adoption vide ordinance No. 2499, pp. 325-6.

The unavoidable delay caused by the circumstances just related, and the pressing necessity of having the ordinances published for the use of the officers of the city and of our citi. zens, at the earliest possible moment, rendered it necessary to send a portion of the manuscript to the printer, before the whole could be examined and compared. It is, therefore, possible, and highly probable, that some errors, discrepancies and omissions, may have occurred in the work. Should any be discovered, they will be corrected by a table of errata.

The ordinances in this volume, have been carefully digested and compiled from the ordinances of the city of a public, general and permanent nature, and no labor has been spared and every precaution taken, to secure accuracy in every particular. This end, it is confidently believed, has been accomplished.

JOHN M. KRUM. St. Louis, SEPTEMBER, 1850.

CONSTITUTION

OP THE

UNITED STATES.

We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more

perfect union, establish justice, ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution of the United States of America.

ARTICLE 1.

SECTION 1.

1. All legislative powers herein granted, shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

SECTION 11.

1. The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several States; and the electors in each State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State Legislature.

2. No person shall be a representative who shall not have attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen.

3. Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to service for a term of years, and exclud-ing Indians not laxed, three fifths of all other persons. The actual enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within.

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