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arrived at Sumner on the steamboat "Duncan S. Carter”. He came, it seems, in search of this city, which had been "depicted in a chromatic triumph of lithographed mendacity', and at the instance of "the loquacious embellishments of a lively adventurer who has been laying out townsites and staking off corner lots for some years past in tophet”.

Sumner was the Free State rival of pro-slavery Atchison. Albert D. Richardson, later the author of Beyond the Mississippi, was a resident the town when Ingalls arrived. The town was a few miles below the pro-slavery metropolis, and it extended to and beyond a bluff so steep and high that the main street was said to be “vertical”.

This town was founded by John P. Wheeler, a surveyor described as "a red-headed, blue-eyed, consumptive, slim, freckled enthusiast from Massachusetts'. He also founded the town of Hiawatha. He named his river town not for Charles Sumner, as one would be likely to believe, but for George Sumner (brother), who was one of the proprietors of the place. Wheeler was an abolitionist, and his town was conceived in the

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same spirit that gave the Territory old Quindaro.

When the Civil War began the pro-slavery people generally left Kansas or changed political faith. Atchison had the better location, and the people of Sumner gradually went there to live. In June, 1860, a tornado blew down most of the houses left in Sumner, and from this catastrophe its extinction is dated. Jonathan G. Lang (the original of "Shang" in "Catfish Aristocracy'') continued to live there on a tract of land which belonged to Ingalls, and was, in jest, called "the mayor of Sumner”. Ingalls followed the other inhabitants of the defunct city of “Great Expectations” to Atchison.

HOME LIFE

MRS. INGALLS

But before this hour of destiny struck the nineteenth century was in swaddling clothes. From a compact habitat along the Atlantic these Saxons had battled with the Frenchman on the north, the Spaniard on the south, and with savages up to and beyond the Alleghenies. They had rebelled against the mother-country and won for themselves and their children liberty and self-control. One of the historic business-ventures of this enterprising people was the purchase of Lou Along with many other things came Kansas. After preliminary processes it was defined — had bounds set for it. Then the two ideas of our national progress came with followers to contend for supremacy, which, once attained in Kansas, was to carry with it mastery of the Nation. With those who came to build the temple of liberty came Ingalls.

Those who break the wilderness are always the stalwart and the brave—the courageousmen with faith, foresight, fortitude. The men and women who came to settle and redeem Kan. sas were themselves descendants of pioneers “Strong builders of empire”.

On the 4th day of October, 1858, John J. Ingalls arrived at Sumner on the steamboat "Duncan S. Carter”. He came, it seems, in search of this city, which had been “depicted in a chromatic triumph of lithographed mendacity", and at the instance of "the loquacious embellishments of a lively adventurer who has been laying out townsites and staking off corner lots for some years past in tophet”.

Sumner was the Free State rival of pro-slavery Atchison. Albert D. Richardson, later the author of Beyond the Mississippi, was a resident of the town when Ingalls arrived. The town was a few miles below the pro-slavery metropolis, and it extended to and beyond a bluff so steep and high that the main street was said to be “vertical”.

This town was founded by John P. Wheeler, a surveyor described as "a red-headed, blue-eyed, consumptive, slim, freckled enthusiast from Massachusetts”. He also founded the town of Hiawatha. He named his river town not for Charles Sumner, as one would be likely to believe, but for George Sumner (brother), who was one of the proprietors of the place. Wheeler was an abolitionist, and his town was conceived in the

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