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Part 3.-Report of the Lieutenant-General Commanding the Army and

Department Commanders:

Lieutenant-General.

Adjutant-General.

Inspector-General.

Chief of Artillery.

Department of the East.

Department of the Lakes.

Department of the Missouri.

Department of Texas.

Department of Dakota.

Department of the Colorado.

Department of California.

Department of the Columbia.

Department of Alaska.

Department of Cuba.

Department of Western Cuba (final).

Infantry and Cavalry School.

Cavalry and Field Artillery School.

Artillery school.

Part 4.- Report of the Lieutenant-General Commanding the Army and

Department Commanders-Continued.

Division of the Philippines (Major-General Mac Arthur).

Part 5.-Report of the Lieutenant-General Commanding the Ariay and

Department Commanders-Continued.

Department of Northern Luzon.

Department of Southern Luzon.

Part 6.-Report of the Lieutenant-General Commanding the Army and

Department Commanders-Continued.

Department of the Visayas.

Department of Mindanao and Jolo.

Military operations in China.

Part 7.--Report of the Lieutenant-General Commanding the Army and

Department Commanders-Continued.

Division of the Philippines (Major-General Chaffee).

Department of Northern Luzon.

Department of Southern Luzon.

Department of the Visayas.

Department of Mindanao and Jolo.

Part 8.-Report of the Philippine Commission from December 1, 1900, to

October 15, 1901.

Part 9.-Report of the Philippine Commission from December 1, 1900, to

October 15, 1901-Continued.

Part 10.–Public Laws and Resolutions passed by the Philippine Commis-

REPORT

OF

THE SECRETARY OF WAR.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., November 27, 1901. To the PRESIDENT:

I have the honor to submit the following report of operations of this Department for the past year:

On the 30th of November, 1900, the date of the last annual report, the Army of the United States, according to the latest reports received from the field, consisted of 2,535 officers and 68,221 enlisted men of the regular establishment, and 1,548 officers (of whom 233 were Regular Army officers holding volunteer commissions) and 31,079 enlisted men of the volunteer force, making a total force of 103,150, consisting of 3,850 officers and 99,300 enlisted men. Of these +,360 were enlisted men of the Hospital Corps.

The volunteer force then existing was raised under the provisions of the act of March 2, 1899, and by the terms of that act was to continue in service not later than July 1, 1901. It was accordingly brought back from the Philippines, where it was substantially all stationed, between the 1st of January and the 30th of June, 1901, to San Francisco, where it was mustered out. Special care was taken to secure full descriptive lists and a thorough medical examination, with a view to aid in the settlement of future applications for pensions. The commanding general of the department reported that the muster out was quiet, orderly, and without incident.” Ninety-seven per cent of the men mustered out proceeded without delay to their respective homes.

PROGRESS OF REORGANIZATION.

The act of February 2, 1901, entitled "An act to increase the efficiency of the permanent military establishment of the United States,"

provided for an increase of line organizations from 25 regiments of infantry to 30, from 10 regiments of cavalry to 15, from 7 regiments of artillery, including 16 field batteries, to a corps of artillery, practically equivalent to 13 regiments under the old organization, and including 30 field batteries, and from 1 battalion of engineers to 3. Minimum and maximum numbers of enlisted men for the different organizations were established by the same statute, so that the total number of enlisted men might be varied by the President, according to the exigencies of the time, from a minimum of 59,131 to a maximum of 100,000, without any change of commissioned officers or in the number of organizations.

The improvement of conditions in the Philippines during the spring and summer of this year made it unnecessary to provide the maximum number allowed by the law, and on the 8th of May an order was made fixing the enlisted strength of the several organizations in such a manner as to establish the aggregate enlisted strength of the Army, including staff departments, but exclusive of hospital corps men, at 77,287, composed as follows: Cavalry

15, 840 Artillery: Coast ..

... 13, 734 Field..

4, 800 Noncommissioned staff and band

328

18, 862 Infantry.....

38 520 Engineer battalions and band

1, 282 Enlisted men staff departments, etc

2, 783

Total Army...

77,287

The new organizations authorized were recruited upon the basis thus prescribed, leaving the organizations in the Philippines and Cuba, which had been temporarily increased to greater numbers, to be reduced to that basis by the ordinary expiration of enlistments and casualties. The new organizations have been completed.

The regular establishment now consists, according to the latest reports which have been received, of 3,253 officers and 76,084 enlisted men. There are also 4,336 men of the Hospital Corps, 172 volunteer surgeons in the Philippines, appointed under section 18 of the act of February 2, 1901, 4,973 native scouts under the command of 98 officers in the Philippines, and 25 officers and 815 men of the Porto Rico Provisional Regiment.

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