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Conn.; the United States ambassador and his entire staff, the United States consul, Mr. Halloway; the United States vice-consul, Mr. Heydecker, and practically all the resident Americans and many British subjects were also present.

The prominent Russians in attendance included Prince Obolenski, representing the foreign office, and two directors of that office; the Russian minister of the interior, M. Sipyaguin; the assistant minister of the interior, M. Stichiniski; Vice-Admiral Tyrtoff, General Rydzeffsky, General Kleigel, the prefect of police; Prince Jules Ouroussoff and a number of other high officials.

The services consisted of readings from the scriptures and hymns, closing with the playing of a dead march.

RUSSIAN PRESS ON M'KINLEY. The tone of the Russian press was uniformly sympathetic with the American people in their bereavement and uniformly just in estimating Mr. McKinley's character. The Novo Vremya says:

"He was a man of large talents and a beloved son of the country for whose welfare he unceasingly and successfully labored.”

The Sviet says: “Let us hope that the death of a talented and energetic president will rouse those lands which for the sake of freedom of conscience and thought harbor bad elements and become the breeding grounds for plots to action against the enemies of civilization.”

The Boerse Gazette says:

“Mr. McKinley was one of the most popular figures in American history and one of the best representatives of American ideals. Society is defenseless against the propaganda of murder. It is scarcely probable that means will be found to prevent the repetition of such crimes."

The semiofficial Journal of Commerce and Industry says:

“Mr. McKinley was not an extreme protectionist. Shortly before his death he spoke out against crude trust protection.”

BRUSSELS. The memorial service in Christ Church this morning was largely attended. A feature was the singing of “Nearer, My God, to Thee." Both the king and queen were represented by high officials.

MOURNING IN VIENNA. Memorial services were held at the American Church September 19 . at the same time as the funeral took place in Canton. The master of the household represented Emperor Francis Joseph. The Prince of Leichenstein, Counted Goluchowski, and the minister of foreign affairs, Dr. Koeber, were in attendance.

AGUINALDO REGRETS LOSS TO THE NATION. Aguinaldo wrote to Civil Governor Taft and Military Governor Chaffee saying that he regrets, with the rest of the American nation, the great loss suffered by the people of the United States in the death of President McKinley.

SERVICES AT COLON, COLOMBIA. An impressive memorial service in honor of the late President McKinley was held at the Anglican Church here September 19, and was attended by Commander McCree and the officers and men of the United States gunboat Machias, the United States consul, Mr. Malmros; the Colombian officials, the consular corps, the members of the American colony and many prominent citizens of all nationalities.

SORROW IN COPENHAGEN. The half-mastings of flags here as a token of sympathy with the United States and respect for the memory of President McKinley was general September 19. The Danish, British and Russian warships in the harbor fired salutes. Portraits of the late president, draped with black, were displayed in many windows.

MOURNING IN INDIA-BOMBAY. September 19 was observed as a day of general mourning for President McKinley throughout India. All the public offices, banks and stores were closed. Services were held at all the central cities.

EXERCISES AT CONSTANTINOPLE. The memorial service at the British embassy chapel at Therapia in honor of the late President McKinley was attended by all the chiefs of the diplomatic mission in full uniform, including Sir N. R. O'Conor, the British ambassador, and Lady O'Conor, and John G. A. Leishman, the United States minister, and his staff; United States Consul-General C. M. Dickinson, representatives of the sultan and the Porte, and the papal delegate, Monsignore Bonati.

SALUTES FIRED AT GIBRALTAR. All the flags were half-masted at noon, September 19, and the channel squadron, the United States training ship Alliance, the German training ship Charlotte and the land batteries fired a salute of twenty-one guns in honor of the late President McKinley. All the ships are flying the American ensign half-mast at the main, and the American ensign is flown half-mast throughout the British fleet.

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The executive committee of the Berlin bourse cabled an expression of profound sympathy to the New York Stock Exchange.

PARIS.

National rejoicings in connection with the Czar's visit suffered a brief but impressive interruption in Paris when Americans, English and French of all classes flocked to Holy Trinity Church to take part in the McKinley memorial service. The ceremony was announced for 3 p. m., but long before the appointed hour the church was packed to suffocation, with the result that Ministers Dupuy and Caillaux, who represented the government, together with several prominent members of the diplomatic corps, experienced the utmost difficulty in fighting their way to the seats reserved for them. Others became impatient and left the porch of the church, disgusted at their vain efforts to obtain admittance.

The immediate surroundings of the church were thronged with large crowds unable to obtain admission yet desirous of showing their sympathy by remaining in the vicinity of the building. Inside, the altar, gallery and pulpit were decorated with the usual mourning. The brilliant uniforms of the diplomatic corps alone lent relief to the scene so imposing in its sadness and simplicity. The great majority of the audience was in black. The ladies were attired in deepest mourning.

Rev. M. Morgan officiated. Ambassador Porter, with the entire staff of the United States embassy, the British ambassador and Sir Edmund Monson and his staff were present. Lieutenant Colonel Meaux Saint-Marc represented President Loubet. The singing of the late president's favorite hymns created a deep impression, many ladies being moved to tears. The ceremony lasted three-quarters of an hour and will be remembered as one of the most touching scenes witnessed in a Paris church for many years.

ST. PETERSBURG. Under the auspices of the United States ambassador, Charlemagne Tower, impressive memorial services in honor of President McKinley were held at 3 o'clock September 19 in the British American Church. The pastor, Rev. Alexander Francis, officiated, assisted by Drs. Kean, Kilburn and Key.

Among those present were the Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovitch, the Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna and the Grand Duke Boris Vladimirovitch, their son, and the Grand Duke Serge Michaelovitch. The diplomatic corps was represented by the British ambassador, Sir Charles Scott, the only ambassador besides Mr. Tower now in St. Petersburg; the ministers to Russia and Orieste Nicholas Vassilieff, formerly of Ansonia, Conn.; the United States ambassador and his entire staff, the United States consul, Mr. Halloway; the United States vice-consul, Mr. Heydecker, and practically all the resident Americans and many British subjects were also present.

The prominent Russians in attendance included Prince Obolenski, representing the foreign office, and two directors of that office; the Russian minister of the interior, M. Sipyaguin; the assistant minister of the interior, M. Stichiniski; Vice-Admiral Tyrtoff, General Rydzeffsky, General Kleigel, the prefect of police; Prince Jules Ouroussoff and a number of other high officials.

The services consisted of readings from the scriptures and hymns, closing with the playing of a dead march.

RUSSIAN PRESS ON M'KINLEY. The tone of the Russian press was uniformly sympathetic with the American people in their bereavement and uniformly just in estimating Mr. McKinley's character. The Novo Vremya says:

"He was a man of large talents and a beloved son of the country for whose welfare he unceasingly and successfully labored.”

The Sviet says: “Let us hope that the death of a talented and energetic president will rouse those lands which for the sake of freedom of conscience and thought harbor bad elements and become the breeding grounds for plots to action against the enemies of civilization.”

The Boerse Gazette says:

“Mr. McKinley was one of the most popular figures in American history and one of the best representatives of American ideals. Society is defenseless against the propaganda of murder. It is scarcely probable that means will be found to prevent the repetition of such crimes.”

The semiofficial Journal of Commerce and Industry says:

"Mr. McKinley was not an extreme protectionist. Shortly before his death he spoke out against crude trust protection.”

BRUSSELS.

MOURNING IN VIENNA.

The memorial service in Christ Church this morning was largely attended. A feature was the singing of “Nearer, My God, to Thee." Both the king and queen were represented by high officials.

MOURNING IN VIENNA. Memorial services were held at the American Church September 19 . at the same time as the funeral took place in Canton. The master of the household represented Emperor Francis Joseph. The Prince of Leichenstein, Counted Goluchowski, and the minister of foreign affairs, Dr. Koeber, were in attendance.

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