Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 16

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Page 133 - If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus.
Page 42 - If civil society be made for the advantage of man, all the advantages for which it is made become his right. It is an institution of beneficence ; and law itself is only beneficence acting by a rule.
Page 79 - ... and shall not be permitted to withhold his testimony upon the ground that it may criminate himself, or subject him to public infamy ; but such testimony shall not afterwards be used against him in any judicial proceeding, except for perjury in giving such testimony...
Page 65 - The personal and civil rights of the inhabitants of the Territories are secured to them, as to other citizens, by the principles of constitutional liberty which restrain all the agencies of government, state and national; their political rights are franchises which they hold as privileges in the legislative discretion of the Congress of the United States.
Page 50 - ... therefor coupon or registered bonds of the United States in such form as he may prescribe, and in...
Page 65 - The people of the United States, as sovereign owners of the National Territories, have supreme power over them and their inhabitants. In the exercise of this sovereign dominion, they are represented by the government of the United States, to whom all the powers of government over that subject have been delegated, subject only to such restrictions as are expressed in the Constitution, or are necessarily implied in its terms...
Page 42 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity ; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, •with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 94 - A representative worthy of you ought to be a person of stability. I am to look, indeed, to your opinions — but to such opinions as you and I must have five years hence. I was not to look to the flash of the day. I knew that you chose me, in my place, along with others, to be a pillar of the State, and not a weathercock on the top of the edifice, exalted for my levity and versatility, and of no use but to indicate the shifting of every fashionable gale.
Page 42 - They have a right to the fruits of their industry ; and to the means of making their industry fruitful. They have a right to the acquisitions of their parents; to the nourishment and improvement of their offspring ; to instruction in life, and to consolation in death. Whatever each man can separately do, without trespassing upon others, he has a right to do for himself...
Page 53 - ... at the pleasure of the United States after ten years from the date of their issue, and payable thirty years...

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