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known, and Adam and Eve in that part of the earth where it is generally supposed was planted the Garden of Eden.

It may be necessary to remark, that in the Engravings, from the third inclusive, the great divisions of the globe, as known subsequent to the flood, are preserved; for though the deluge doubtless caused vast changes in the earth's structure, yet there is great reason to believe that its general character remained the same; for Moses, writing near one thousand years subsequent to the flood, speaks not only of the four rivers of Eden, as then known, but also enlarges on the countries through which they flowed :— "The first, Pison; that which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where is gold: the second, Gihon, encompassing the whole land of Ethiopia: the third, Hiddekel, which goeth towards Assyria: and the fourth, Euphrates." On the banks of the third river, Daniel had his visions, and the fourth bears the same name to this day.†

In the Letters from a Father to his Children, that accompany the Plates, the object has been, first, in language adapted to the tender age of childhood, to show the goodness and beneficence of God in each day's creation; then to explain what may be called the natural history of each day's mercies; and, thirdly, to point out, from Scripture examples, how continually the Holy Spirit, through the Word, uses the natural figures of creation to set forth Divine truth, of which the pathetic lamentation of our blessed Lord over Jerusalem affords, perhaps, the tenderest example: "O Jerusalem, Jerusalem,

*It is manifest, from Gen. v. 2, that Eve was created IN Adam; but whether she was brought to him the sixth day, is not revealed. Their oneness is strikingly shown in the words, "Male and female created he them, and blessed them, and called their name ADAM, in the day they were created."

It is quite true that Moses does not expressly say that this was the course of these rivers before the flood, but still the language seems to imply as much.

that killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee, how often would I have gathered thy children together, even as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings, and ye would not!" (Matt. xxiii. 37.) And, although in a work so purely elementary, the subjects of science are not gone very deeply into, yet the general features of the earth's structure-the properties of light, the nature of our atmosphere, the great divisions of the mineral and vegetable kingdoms, the size, position, and velocity of the heavenly bodies, the natural history of birds, and fishes, and quadrupeds, are attempted simply to be brought before the youthful mind, in the plainest language: the difficult terms of science are as much as possible avoided, or, when of necessity used, they are explained. The subject of Geology is not entered on in these Letters; it is one far too deep for young children; and of late years so much bold speculation has prevailed on it, and so many theories have been brought forward and abandoned, that the ground is considered by some as dangerous to tread on. If causes are too difficult to unravel, far better to abide by the word of God, and in humble prayer to Him for his Spirit, to seek to know the truth, rather than run into the wild regions of speculation and doubt. The word of God must not be bent to suit man's notions of the fitness of things, but man's notions must be tried by God's word. A solemn, prayerful study of Geology cannot be wrong, but it requires great watchfulness and caution.

And relative to the mercies with which we are daily surrou rounded, let any parent inquire of his little family, when gathered around the breakfast table,"I wonder how many blessings of the six days' creation have lent their aid to supply our wants this morning?" and such a parent shall see the eyes of the little ones glisten with delight, while each, on the alert, seeks to make its "Light," one of them replies. "The sun, papa," the least, perhaps

answer.

calls out. "Our bread is made of wheat," a third answers; while a little one whispers, sitting close by his father, "and our sugar and our tea were made the same day as the wheat, papa." "And the cow, which was created the last day, gives us milk and butter," another replies. And so the eggs and fish (if such bounties were present) would offer another answer; while the eldest boy, who might be musing the while with rather more science than the rest, would say, "Is not, papa, the open firmament of heaven, in which the birds of the air fly, and which was created the second day, the same as our atmosphere which we breathe so pleasantly, and through which the bright rays of the sun come to us refracted, making everything so bright, and warm, and cheerful?" Thus the whole six days are continually pouring upon man their blessings; for our God causeth his sun to shine on all, and opens his hands and fills all things living with plenteousness. (Psalm cxlv.)

This little Work, which has been prayerfully undertaken, is thus earnestly commended to the Lord for his blessing: may He sanctify it to those so dear to us, and cause the whole scene of the earth's beauty and the heaven's brightness to come to their young minds filled with instruction, so that not only may they become more and more intelligent concerning the works of God, and their wonderful adaptation to man, as the great occupant or tenant of the globe, but that also everything in nature they behold may bring before them some divine truth illustrated by it ;-the lamb of the fold will tell them of that gracious Saviour so shadowed forth under that lowly emblem; the eagle bearing her young on her wings, the power of God in bearing his people through this wilderness: even the sparrows chirping on the spray, numbered by our heavenly Father, will bring to their remembrance his gracious words, who said, "Fear not, ye are of more value than many sparrows." The lily of the valley and the fragrant flowers, with which God has so beautifully and

richly clothed the field, are all full of instruction. For who can forget that word (equally applicable now as then) with which our blessed Lord comforted his disciples,-" Wherefore if God so clothe the grass of the field, which to-day is, and to-morrow is cast into the oven, will he not much more clothe you, O ye of little faith?" (Matt. vi. 30.)

THE CREATION.

LETTER I.

FOR BY HIM WERE ALL THINGS CREATED, THAT ARE IN HEAVEN, AND THAT ARE IN EARTH, VISIBLE AND INVISIBLE, WHETHER THEY BE THRONES, OR DOMINIONS, OR PRINCIPALITIES, OR POWERS: ALL THINGS WERE CREATED BY HIM, AND FOR HIM AND HE IS BEFORE ALL THINGS, AND BY HIM ALL THINGS CONSIST.— Colossians i. 16, 17.

MY DEAR CHILDREN,

I HAVE lately thought that it might be useful, in addition to the designs of the Six Days of Creation that I have had engraved for you and other young friends of the same age, if I were to write you a few plain and simple letters, opening out to your young minds the natural history of each day's mercies, and the manner in which the things around us are continually used in the blessed Word of God to set forth divine truths; so that whilst, in our walks together, we gaze on the earth's beauty and the heaven's brightness, you may be led more and

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