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The following list shows the number of patrons of the resorts within the park during the past season: Highy Bros., Fern Lake, hotel and summer camp

1, 055 Higby Bros., The Pool, rest house (estimated)

25 Willard H. Ashton, Lawn Lake, rest house (estimated)

100 Enos Mills, Longs Peak, shelter cabin, lodging and meals.

430 Enos Mills, Longs Peak, shelter cabin, without lodging or meals.

1, 064 A. E. Sprague, Bartholdt Park, hotel and summer resort (estimated). 800 E. A. Brown, Bear Lake, summer resort and camp (estimated)

500

RECOMMENDATIONS.

I herewith submit the following recommendations: That this office should have the services of a clerk and stenographer at a salary of $900 per annum; that a two-seated automobile be purchased for the use of this office; that the salaries of rangers be increased to $1,200 per annum; that the force of rangers be increased to four for the present; that legislation be recommended for an appropriation of $50,000 for the continuation of the Fall River Road; that the telephone line on Fall River Road be extended to Specimen ranger station; that a shelter station be constructed on the eastern slope of Flat Top Mountain.

Also that the following new trails be constructed, if an appropriation is made sufficiently large for this purpose, the average cost of trails in this locality being approximately $150 per mile: Trail on Tombstone Ridge, terminating at Poudre Lakes, distance 15 miles; trail from Lake Helene to Flat Top Mountain, distance 14 miles; trail from Odessa Lake to Lake Helene, distance 14 miles; trail from Fern Lake to Hour Glass Lake via Spruce Lake, distance 3 miles; a trail from "The Pool” through Forest Canyon to Poudre Lakes, distance 15 miles, which trail would pass through the best-timbered region in the national park; a trail to Mills Lake and Glacier Gorge, distance about 3 miles; a trail from Fall River ranger cabin to the northern boundary of the park at a point where the Poudre River crosses the boundary line, distance about 5 miles; foot trail to Chasm Lake, located at the head of “ East Gorge" of Longs Peak. Very respectfully,

C. R. TROWBRIDGE,

Acting Supervisor. The SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, D. C.

APPENDIX.

RULES AND REGULATIONS APPROVED MAY 29, 1915.

National parks are established for the benefit and enjoyment of the people, preserving the natural conditions within their boundaries in unimpaired form for present and future generations. In furtherance of this, the Secretary of the Interior asks the cooperation of the public in the following rules and regulations :

(1) Cooperation is sought toward preventing the destruction, injury, or defacement in any way of the public property or the trees, vegetation, rocks, minerals, animal and bird, or other life, or other natural conditions and curiosities in the park.

(2) Visitors and others must not cut living timber without written permission of the supervisor. Camping parties may use dead or fallen timber for fuel. Stumps should be cut as close to the ground as possible.

(3) It is very dangerous to life to throw stones from cliffs, to roll bowlders down hills, or to pollute the waters within the park, and such practices should be carefully avoided.

(4) Fires constitute one of the greatest perils to the park; they must not be kindled near trees, dead wood, moss, dry leaves, or other vegetable refuse, but in some open space on rocks or dirt. When fires are no longer necessary they must be completely extinguished, and the embers and bed smothered with dirt or water, so that there remains no possibility of reignition.

(5) The park is a sanctuary for wild life of every sort, and no one should frighten, hunt or kill, wound or capture any bird or wild animal in the park except dangerous animals when it is necessary to prevent them from destroying life or inflicting injury.

(6) The outfits, including guns, traps, teams, horses, or means of transportation used by persons engaged in hunting, killing, trapping, ensnaring, or capturing such birds or wild animals, or in possession of game killed on the park lands under other circumstances than prescribed above, must be taken up by the supervisor and held subject to the order of the Secretary of the Interior, except in cases where it is shown by satisfactory evidence that the outfit is not the property of the person or persons violating this regulation and the actual owner was not a party to such violation. Firearms will be permitted in the park only on written permission of the supervisor. Visitors entering or traveling through the park to places beyond should, at entrance, report and surrender all firearms, traps, nets, seines, or explosives in their possession to the first park officer, and, in proper cases, may obtain his written leave to carry them through the park sealed.

(7) Fishing is permitted with hook and line only and never for profit or merchandise. Fishing in particular water or except in special seasons may be suspended by the supervisor. All fish hooked less than 7 inches long shall be carefully handled with moist hands and returned at once to the water if not seriously injured. Fish retained should be killed. Thirty fish will constitute the limit for a day's catch.

(8) Much of the park area is little traveled, rugged, and, to inexperienced persons, dangerous, and visitors are urged to employ licensed guides. Large camp outfits and pack trains should be accompanied by a licensed guiile, unless authority to travel without such licensed guide is granted by the supervisor. The supervisor will grant authority to competent persons to act as guides, and may revoke the same in his discretion.

(9) No person will be permitted to reside permanently, engage in any business, or erect buildings upon the Government lands in the park without permission, in writing, from the Secretary of the Interior.

(10) Owners of patented lands within the park limits are entitled to the full use and enjoyment thereof; the boundaries of such lands, however, must be

determined, and marked and defined, so that they may be readily distinguished from the park lands. While no limitations or conditions are imposed upon the use of such private lands so long as such use does not interfere with or injure the park, private owners must provide against trespass by their stock or cattle, or otherwise, upon the park lands, and all trespasses committed will be punished to the full extent of the law. Stock may be taken over the park lands to patented private lands with the written permission and under the supervision of the supervisor, but such permission and supervision are not required when access to such private lands is had wholly over roads or lands not owned or controlled by the United States.

(11) Allowing the running at large, herding, or grazing of cattle or stock of any kind on the Government lands in the park, as well as the driving of such stock or cattle over same, must be avoided except where authority therefor has been granted by the supervisor. The supervisor will make every effort not to burden bona fide settlers near the park boundaries in the grazing of their domestic stock, and has authority to deal with these and other special cases. Cattle or stock found improperly on the park lands may be impounded and held until claimed by the owner and the trespass adjusted.

(12) No drinking saloon or barroom will be permitted upon Government lands in the park, and, in conformity to the laws of the State of Colorado, the sale or gift of intoxicating beverages will not be permitted in the park after January 1, 1916.

(13) Only such private notices or advertisements as are necessary to the convenience and guidance of the public, and then only when arranged in appropriate style, will be allowed in the park.

(14) Campers and those stopping for lunch are urged to leave as little permanent evidence of their visit as possible. Camp should be pitched away from streams and highways. All paper, boxes, straw, and other inflammable litter or garbage should be carefully burned before leaving, and other refuse, such as cans, should be crushed and buried. Leave no refuse in or near running water.

(15) Automobiles are permitted on all the highways of the park without charge until further order, but reasonable speed, great caution, and frequent sound warning are essential to safety.

(16) Persons who render themselves obnoxious by improper conduct or who violate the letter or spirit of these regulations will be summarily removed from the park and not permitted to return without written permission from the Secretary of the Interior. No lessee or. licensee shall retain in his employment any person whose presence in the park may be deemed by the supervisor subversive of good order and management of the park.

(17) The foregoing are hereby announced as the rules and regulations for the government of this park. The supervisor is hereby authorized and directed to remove all trespassers from the park lands and to enforce these rules and regulations and the provisions of Congress.

AN ACT TO ESTABLISH THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK

IN THE STATE OF COLORADO, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the tract of land in the State of Colorado particularly described by and included within metes and bounds as follows, to wit: Beginning at the southeast corner of section thirty-four, township three north, range seventy-three west of the sixth principal meridian, Colorado, thence north along the section lines to the northeast corner of section three, said township; thence west to the northwest corner of said section; thence north along the section lines to the northeast corner of section sixteen, township four north, range seventy-three west; thence west to the northwest corner of said section; thence north to the northeast corner of section eight, said township; thence west along the section lines to the northwest corner of section seven, said township; thence north to the northeast corner of township four north, range seventy-four west; thence west along the first correction line north, to the southeast corner of section thirty-six, township five north, range seventy-four west; thence north along the range line to the northeast corner of the southeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section thirteen, said township; thence west to the northwest corner of the southeast quarter

of the southeast quarter of section fourteen, said township; thence north to the northwest corner of the northeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section eleven, said township; thence east to the northeast corner of the northeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section twelve, said township; thence south along the range line to the southeast corner of said section; thence east along the section lines to the southeast corner of the southwest quarter of section ten, township five north, range seventy-three west; thence north to the northeast corner of the southwest quarter of said section; thence east to the southeast corner of the northeast quarter of said section; thence north to the northeast corner of said section; thence east to the southeast corner of the southwest quarter of the southwest quarter of section two, said township; thence north to the northeast corner of the southwest quarter of the southwest quarter of said section; thence east to the southeast corner of the northeast quarter of the southwest quarter, said section; thence north to the northeast corner of the northeast quarter of the southwest quarter of said section; thence east to the southeast corner of the northeast quarter of section one, said township; thence north along the range line to the northeast corner of section thirty-six, township seven north, range seventy-three west; thence west along the section lines to the intersection with the west bank of the Big South Cache la Poudre River in township seven north, range seventy-five west; thence southeasterly along the west bank of said river to the mouth of a tributary of said river, probably in section one, township six north, range seventy-five west; said tributary heading at La Poudre Pass in section twenty, township six north, range seventy-five west; thence southwesterly along the west bank of said tributary to its head; thence across the Continental Divide to the headwaters of the North Fork of the Grand River, which also heads at La Poudre Pass; thence down the west bank of the North Fork of the Grand River to its intersection with the section line between sections twenty-nine and thirty, township six north, range seventy-five west; thence south along the section lines to the southeast corner of section eighteen, township five north, range seventy-five west; thence west along the section line to its intersection with the west bank of the North Fork of the Grand River; thence down the west bank of the North Fork of the Grand River to its intersection with the section line between sections twenty-five and thirty-six, township four north, range seventy-six west; thence east to the northeast corner of section thirty-six, said township; thence south along the range line to the southeast corner of said township; thence east along the township line to the northeast corner of the northwest quarter of section four, township three north, range seventy-five west; thence south to the southwest corner of the northeast quarter of section nine, said township; thence west along the quarter section line to its intersection with a creek in section seven, said township, this creek being an outlet of Grand Lake, and flowing into the North Fork of the Grand River; thence southerly along the said creek to its junction with the North Fork of the Grand River; thence southerly along the west bank of the North Fork of the Grand River to its intersection with the township line between townships two and three north; thence east along the township line to the southeast corner of section thirty-four, township three north, range seventy-three west of the sixth principal meridian, Colorado, the place of beginning, all of said above-described tract now being included within the boundaries of the counties of Grand, Boulder, and Larimer, in the State of Colorado, is hereby reserved and withdrawn from settlement, occupancy, or disposal under the laws of the United States, and said tract is dedicated and set apart as a public park for the benefit and enjoyment of the people of the United States, under the name of the Rocky Mountain National Park: Provided, That the United States Reclamation Service may enter upon and utilize for flowage or other purposes any area within said park which may be necessary for the development and maintenance of a Government reclamation project.

Sec. 2. That nothing herein contained shall effect any valid existing claim, location, or entry under the land laws of the United States, whether for home stead, mineral, right of way, or any other purpose whatsoever, or shall affect the rights of any such claimant, locator, or entryman to the full use and enjoyment of his land. Whenever consistent with the primary purposes of the park the act of February fifteenth, nineteen hundred and one, applicable to the location of rights of way in certain national parks and the national forests for irrigation and other purposes, shall be and remain applicable to the lands included within the park. The Secretary of the Interior may, in his discretion

and upon such conditions as he may deem wise, grant easements or rights of way for steam, electric, or similar transportation upon or across the park.

SEC. 3. That no lands located within the park boundaries now held in private, municipal, or State ownership shall be affected by or subject to the provisions of this act.

SEC. 4. That the said park shall be under the executive control of the Sece retary of the Interior, and it shall be the duty of the said executive authority, as soon as practicable, to make and publish such reasonable rules and regulations, not inconsistent with the laws of the United States, as the said authority may deem necessary or proper for the care, protection, management, and improvement of the same, the said regulations being primarily aimed at the freest use of the said park for recreation purposes by the public and for the preservation of the natural conditions and scenic beauties thereof. The said authority may, in his discretion, execute leases to parcels of ground not exceeding twenty acres in extent in any one place to any person or company for not to exceed twenty years whenever such ground is necessary for the erection of establishments for the accommodation of visitors, may grant such other necessary privileges and concessions as he deems wise for the accommodation of visitors, and may likewise arrange for the removal of such mature or dead or down timber as he may deem necessary and advisable for the protection and improvement of the park. The regulations governing the park shall include provisions for the us of automobiles therein: Provided, That no appropriation for the maintenance supervision, or improvement of said park in excess of $10.000 annually shall be made unless the same shall have first been expressly authorized by law.

Approved, January 26, 1915.

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