Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

Alexander Johnston, American Orations: Studies in American Political History. (Edited by James Albert Woodburn.) 4 vols. New York, etc., 18961897. — Vols. III and IV are parallel with this volume.

William MacDonald, Select Statutes and other Documents illustrative of the
History of the United States, 1861-1898. This third volume of Professor
MacDonald's series, covering the period from 1861 down, is in preparation.
Edward McPherson, The Political History of the United States during the
Great Rebellion. Washington, etc., 1864.

Edward McPherson, The Political History of the United States during the
Period of Reconstruction. Washington, 1871.

Edward McPherson, A Hand-Book of Politics (biennial volumes, omitting 1870). Washington, 1868-1894.- The above three series are made up of excellent selections or abstracts from the political documents of the time, statutes, proclamations, speeches, letters, orders, decisions of the courts, political platforms, debates, etc.

Edmund Clarence Stedman and Ellen Mackay Hutchinson, editors, A Library of American Literature, from the Earliest Settlement to the Present Time. II vols. New York, 1888-1890.- Vols. VI-XI on the period 1845-1890. These volumes are to a large degree literary rather than historical, but they include some excellent contemporary narratives on the slavery conflict and the Civil War.

United States, A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents. 10 vols. Washington, 1896–1899. — A valuable official publication, poorly edited by James D. Richardson, containing all the presidents' messages and proclamations except nominations for office. Sold by the government at

cost.

United States, Congressional Globe: containing Sketches of the Debates and Proceedings. 109 vols. Washington, 1835-1873. - Contains the debates from 1833 to 1873.

United States, Congressional Record. 34 vols. Washington, 1873-1901.-
Contains the debates and proceedings in full from 1873.

6. A Good Library of Sources

FOR

OR an intelligent study of the political history of the United States, the first necessity is access to the most important government records. Exact titles of these publications are found in Channing and Hart's Guide, § 30. Odd volumes and partial sets are common and may be very useful.

OFFICIAL RECORDS OF THE UNITED STATES

1790-1854. B. R. Curtis, Reports of Decisions in the United States; with Notes and a Digest. 22 vols. densed reports.

Supreme Court of the
Boston, 1881. — Con-

1855-1862. Samuel F. Miller, Reports of Decisions in the Supreme Court of the United States. 4 vols. Washington, 1874-1875. — Condensed reports, in continuation of Curtis.

1863-1874. John William Wallace, Cases Argued and Adjudged. 23 vols. Washington, 1870-1876.

1875-1882. William T. Otto, Cases Argued and Adjudged. 17 vols. Also bears the title, United States Reports, Supreme

Boston, 1876-1883. Court, Vols. 91–107. 1882-1899. J. C. Bancroft Davis, United States Reports. 71 vols. New York, etc., 1884-1900.

Vols. 108-178.

1791-1897. Official Opinions of the Attorneys-General of the United States. 21 vols. Washington, 1852-1898.

1833-1873. United States, Congressional Globe: containing Sketches of the Debates and Proceedings. 109 vols. Washington, 1835-1873. - Contains the debates from 1833 on.

1789-1900. United States, Statutes at Large. 31 vols. Boston, etc., 1850– 1900.- - The official text of statutes from 1789 to 1900.

――

1789-1897. United States, A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents. 10 vols. Washington, 1896-1899. - A valuable official publication, poorly edited by James D. Richardson, containing all the presidents' messages and proclamations except nominations for office. Sold by the government at cost.

1873-1900. United States, Congressional Record. 34 vols. Washington, 1873-1901. — Official reports of debates.

DIARIES AND AUTOBIOGRAPHIES

In comparison with earlier times, the period after 1845 is very deficient in materials of this kind, except during the Civil War.

[Thomas Hart Benton], Thirty Years' View; or, A History of the Working of the American Government for Thirty Years, from 1820 to 1850. 2 vols. New York, etc., 1854-1856.

James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress [1861-1881]. 2 vols. Norwich, Conn., 1884-1886.

[James Buchanan], Mr. Buchanan's Administration on the Eve of the Rebellion. New York, 1866.

F[rancis] B[icknell] Carpenter, Six Months at the White House with Abraham Lincoln. New York, 1866.

L[ucius] E[ugene] Chittenden, Personal Reminiscences, 1840-1890, including some not hitherto published of Lincoln and the War. New York, 1893. James Freeman Clarke, Anti-Slavery Days. New York, 1884.

Reuben Davis, Recollections of Mississippi and Mississippians. Boston, etc., 1891.

Ulysses] S. Grant, Personal Memoirs. 2 vols. New York, 1885-1886.
Horace Greeley, Recollections of a Busy Life. New York, etc., 1868.

Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations during the Late War between the States. New York, 1874.

Chicago, 1884.

George W. Julian, Political Recollections, 1840 to 1872.
James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox; Memoirs of the Civil
War in America. Philadelphia, 1896.

A. K. McClure, Abraham Lincoln and Men of War Times. Philadelphia, 1892.

Hugh McCulloch, Men and Measures of Half a Century; Sketches and Comments. New York, 1888.

Samuel J [oseph] May, Some Recollections of our Antislavery Conflict. Boston, 1869.

Frederick Law Olmsted, The Cotton Kingdom. 2 vols. New York, etc., 1861. William Howard Russell, My Diary North and South [1861].

2 vols.

London, 1863.

William H. Seward, Autobiography, from 1801 to 1834, with a Memoir of his Life. (Edited by F. W. Seward.) New York, 1877.

Philip] H. Sheridan, Personal Memoirs. 2 vols. New York, 1888.

John Sherman, Recollections of Forty Years in the House, Senate, and Cabinet. 2 vols. Chicago, etc., 1895.

William T[ecumseh] Sherman, Memoirs. By himself. 2 vols. New York, 1875.

John Sherman and William Tecumseh Sherman, Letters. (Edited by Rachel Sherman Thorndike.) New York, 1894.

Alexander H. Stephens, A Constitutional View of the Late War between the States. 2 vols. Philadelphia, etc. [1868-1870].

Thurlow Weed, Autobiography. (Edited by Harriet A. Weed.) Boston, etc., 1884.

TRAVELS

Books of foreign travels are not so numerous or important as earlier in our history. A long list will be found in Channing and Hart's Guide, $ 24. The following are of special importance:

Isabella Bird, The Englishwoman in America. London, 1856.

Paul Bourget, Outre-Mer; Impressions of America [1893-1894]. New York, 1895.

Fredrika Bremer, The Homes of the New World; Impressions of America [1849-1851]. (Translated by Mary Howitt.) 2 vols. New York, 1853. William Chambers, Things as they are in America [1853]. London, etc., 1854. Emily Faithfull, Three Visits to America [1872, 1882, 1884]. Edinburgh, 1884.

George A. McCall, Letters from the Frontier. Written during a Period of Thirty Years' Service in the United States Army. Philadelphia, 1868. Anthony Trollope, North America [1861-1862]. New York, 1862.

WORKS OF STATESMEN

Charles Dudley Warner, Studies in the South and West, with Comments on Canada. New York, 1889.

George S. Boutwell, Speeches and Papers relating to the Rebellion and the Overthrow of Slavery. Boston, 1867.

Rufus Choate, Works. (Edited by S. G. Brown.) 2 vols.

Boston, 1862.

George William Curtis, Orations and Addresses. (Edited by C. E. Norton.)

3 vols. New York, 1894.

John A. Dix, Speeches and Occasional Addresses. 2 vols. New York, 1864.

Joshua R. Giddings, Speeches in Congress. Boston, etc., 1853.

Abraham Lincoln, Complete Works. (Edited by John G. Nicolay and John
Hay.) 2 vols.
New York, 1894.

(Edited by G. E. Baker.) 5 vols. New York,

William H. Seward, Works. etc., 1853-1884.

Charles Sumner, Works. 15 vols. Boston, 1875-1883.

Samuel J. Tilden, Writings and Speeches. (Edited by John Bigelow.) 2 vols. New York, 1885.

PART II

EXPANSION AND SLAVERY

CHAPTER II-THE MEXICAN WAR

On the Coast of California (1835)

BY RICHARD HENRY DANA (1840)

7.

Dana, who afterward became prominent as a lawyer and as a writer on international law, sought to restore his health during his college days by taking a sea voyage as a common sailor. Most of the two years thus spent was employed in sailing up and down the coast of California. The book in which he describes the routine and incidents of this experience acquired great popularity as a vivid and truthful narrative of the life of the common sailor, and is one of the few accounts of Mexican California. --For Dana, see C, F. Adams, Richard Henry Dana. — Bibliography: H. H. Bancroft, History of the Pacific States, XV, chs. xi-xiv passim.

HE bay of Monterey is very wide at the entrance, being about

two points, Año Nuevo at the

―――

north, and Pinos at the south, but narrows gradually as you approach the town. . . . We came to anchor within two cable lengths of the shore, and the town lay directly before us, making a very pretty appearance; its houses being plastered, which gives a much better effect than those of Santa Barbara, which are of a mud-color. The red tiles, too, on the roofs, contrasted well with the white plastered sides, and with the extreme greenness of the lawn upon which the houses - about an hundred in number were dotted about, here and there, irregularly. .* . * 06 . . . The next day we were "turned-to" early, and began taking off the hatches, overhauling the cargo, and getting everything ready for inspection. At eight, the officers of the customs, five in number, came on board, and began overhauling the cargo, manifest, &c. The Mexican revenue laws are very strict, and require the whole cargo to be landed, examined, and taken on board again; but our agent, Mr. R had succeeded in compounding with them for the two last vessels, and saving

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »