Englische studien: Organ für englische philologie unter mitberücksichtigung des englischen unterrichts auf höheren schulen ..., Volume 45

Front Cover
Gebr. Henninger, 1912
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 167 - Motionless torrents! silent cataracts! Who made you glorious as the gates of Heaven Beneath the keen full moon? Who bade the sun Clothe you with rainbows? Who, with living flowers Of loveliest blue, spread garlands at your feet? God! — let the torrents, like a shout of nations, Answer! and let the ice-plains echo, God!
Page 167 - Thou too, hoar Mount! with thy sky-pointing peaks, Oft from whose feet the avalanche, unheard, Shoots downward, glittering through the pure serene Into the depth of clouds, that veil thy breast Thou too again, stupendous Mountain!
Page 167 - Green vales and icy cliffs, all join my Hymn. Thou first and chief, sole Sovereign of the Vale! O, struggling with the darkness all the night, And visited all night by troops of stars...
Page 10 - It is a common practice now-a-days, amongst a sort of shifting companions that run through every art and thrive by none, to leave the trade of Noverint, whereto they were born, and busy themselves with the endeavors of art, that could scarcely Latinize their neck-verse if they should have need; yet English Seneca, read by candle-light, yields many good sentences, as blood is a beggar...
Page 183 - Enter Friar Bacon, drawing the curtains, with a white stick, a book in his hand, and a lamp lighted by him, and the Brazen Head; and Miles, with weapons by him. Bacon. Miles, where are you? Miles. Here, sir. Bacon. How chance you tarry so long?
Page 432 - We do not admire the man of timid peace. We admire the man who embodies victorious effort ; the man who never wrongs his neighbor ; who is prompt to help a friend ; but who has those virile qualities necessary to win in the stern strife of actual life.
Page 167 - ... moon ? Who bade the sun Clothe you with rainbows? Who, with living flowers Of loveliest blue, spread garlands at your feet? — God! let the torrents, like a shout of nations, Answer! and let the ice-plains echo, God! God ! sing ye meadow-streams with gladsome voice ! Ye pine-groves, with your soft and soul-like sounds...
Page 192 - He, as his mistress doth; and she, by chance: Nor want there those who, as the boy doth dance Between the acts, will censure the whole play; Some like, if the wax-lights be new that day; But multitudes there are whose judgment goes Headlong according to the actors
Page 167 - Ye living flowers that skirt the eternal frost! Ye wild goats sporting round the eagle's nest! Ye eagles, play-mates of the mountain storm! Ye lightnings, the dread arrows of the clouds ! Ye signs and wonders of the elements ! Utter forth God, and fill the hills with praise ! Thou too, hoar mount!
Page 193 - Enter Atticus, Doricus, and Phylomuse, they sit a good while on the stage before the Candles are lighted, etc., etc. . . Enter Tier-man with lights." This waiting until the last moment before lighting up is also indicated in the induction to Middleton's Michaelmas Term, as acted at the same house in 1 607.

Bibliographic information