Three Dissertations: One on the Characters of Augustus, Horace and Agrippa, with a Comparison Between His Two Ministers, Agrippa and Maecenas

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R. Dodsley, 1740 - 118 pages
 

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Page 20 - Greece to form their heroes, their orators, and poets on a right model, than by their unjuft attempt upon the liberty of the world, they juftly loft their own. With their liberty, they loft not only their force of eloquence, but even their ftyle and * Ver.
Page 39 - The moral artist who can thus imitate the Creator, and is thus knowing in the inward form and structure of his fellow-creature, will hardly, I presume, be found unknowing in himself, or at a loss in those numbers which make the harmony of a mind.
Page 56 - We see in outward carriage and behaviour how ridiculous any one becomes who imitates another, be he ever so graceful. They are mean spirits who love to copy merely, nothing is agreeable or natural but what is original. Our manners, like our faces, though ever so beautiful, must differ in their beauty.
Page 33 - The skill and grace of writing is founded, as our wise poet tells us, in knowledge and good sense ; and not barely in that knowledge which is to be learnt from common authors, or the general...
Page 54 - ... only, and loves to engage his Passion, by view of other Passion and Emotion, comprehends little of the Restraints, Allays and Corrections, which form this New and Artificial Creature. For such indeed is the truly virtuous Man; whose ART...
Page 34 - Twas not enough that these pieces treated fundamentally of morals and in consequence pointed out real characters and manners: they exhibited them alive, and set the countenances and complexions of men plainly in view. And by this means they not only taught us to know others but, what was principal and of highest virtue in them, they taught us to know ourselves.
Page 61 - Greek derivation, to signify sense of public weal, and of the common interest ; love of the community or society, natural affection, humanity, obligingness, or that sort of civility which rises from a just sense of the common rights of mankind, and the natural equality there is among those of the same species.
Page 27 - They who can read an epiftle or fatire of Horace in fomewhat better than a mere fcholaftic relifh, will comprehend, that the concealment of order and method, in this manner of writing, makes the chief beauty of the work.
Page 61 - interpret this very differently from what is generally apprehended. They make this common sense of the poet, by a Greek derivation, to signify sense of public weal, and of the common interest ; love of the community or society, natural affection, humanity, obligingness, or that sort of civility which rises from a just sense of the common rights of mankind, and the natural equality there...
Page 40 - The best music of barbarians is hideous and astonishing sounds. And the fine sights of Indians are enormous figures, various odd and glaring colours and whatever of that sort is amazingly beheld with a kind of horror and consternation.

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