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Toll Line to Yosemite

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Held prisoner for more than two hours on now of the three gangs of men who are doing top of a pinnacle of rock at a place called the work. Poverty Point, Foreman James Killebrew, The new line extends from the Yosemite who was engaged in laying out the com- Valley railroad depot at Merced a distance pany's new line into the Yosemite Valley, of seventy-eight miles to El Portal, paralstayed at his post for two hours like the boy leling the railroad's right of way to the termon the burning deck. Killebrew, however, inus. Eventually the line will be continued managed eventually to escape from his pre- from El Portal to the Sentinel Hotel, a disdicament after a thrilling adventure.

tance of fourteen miles. The line as now laid The foreman climbed onto the high pillar out passes through Snelling, Merced Falls, of rock, which rose some 150 feet from the and Bagby. level, to establish a post for a pole, but when From Merced Falls to El Portal, a dishe decided to come down he found his way tance of fifty-four miles, the most difficult cut off on every hand by the sheer descent construction has been encountered. Not of the sides of the cliff. So he sat down to more than one-third of the poles in this secwait, and eventually a handcar with mem- tion have been set in earth. In a majority bers of his crew came along. The foreman of cases it has been necessary to blast holes. shouted for help and explained the difficulty. This is done by drilling a hole three feet deep He had with him a light rope, one end of and charging it with a pound of dynamite. which he threw down, and a block and tackle The explosion can be counted on to tear a arrangement was soon perfected. With the hole several feet across and into this the pole aid of the heavier rope thus conveyed to him is set, being then secured by filling in about it. the foreman managed to clamber down the In many instances, however, even this hill, dropping from level to level and keep method has been impossible. Where solid ing himself from falling by clinging to the rock is encountered a smooth hole large line.

enough to hold an inch and a half iron pipe The construction of the Yosemite Valley is drilled and the pipe is set into this hole a line has presented difficulties never before en- distance of ten inches, protruding thence countered in The Pacific Telephone and some five feet. A cross-arm is attached to Telegraph Company's territory. For many the pipe which takes the place of the pole. miles the posts are set either in solid rock or As this sort of work is done generally on the in holes made by blasting the loose rock and brink of cliffs there is no need for a higher earth. Probably no more hazardous and ex- pole. pensive construction has ever been attempted It takes from four to eight hours for two anywhere, unless, perhaps, in Colorado, men to drill one of these pipe holes, and on where toll lines have been built through the

an average twelve drills are required for mountains.

each hole. A blacksmith is a member of the The Yosemite toll line was laid out by construction gang. H. O. Jackson, district superintendent of The work on the Yosemite Valley line was construction with headquarters at Stockton, begun on April 10, and it is expected that who has had similar experience in Colorado. it will be finished by August 1. · The line J. F. Lowrie, general inspector, laid out the has been divided into three sections and a working plans and had charge of the begin- crew of twenty-five men are engaged on each ning of actual construction, which was later section. The men camp out near the scene turned over to F. J. Pazak, who is in charge of the work.

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Group 1. (Population over 100,000)

Group 5. (Population 3000 to 5000)

xLos Angeles 220,000 30,185 32.144 14.61 6.4

Oakland

778

..130,000

Albany

775 17.22

12,241

4,500

13,696 10.53 11.8

Anacortes

440 448

4,500

9.95

x Portland

140,000 20,374 21,178 15.13 3.9

Ashland

412

San Francisco .325,000

4,500

429

23,038

9.53

29,938 9.21 29.9

Chehalis

4,500 200

345 7.67

x Seattle ...175,000 19,304 22,886 13.08 18.5

Colton

3,000 293 317 10.57

Total or average.990,000 105,142 119,842 12.10

13.9 * Dayton (Wash). 3,000 428 489 16.30

*Ellensburg

4,000 339 354 8.85

Group 2. Population (25,000 to 100,000)

xHollywood

3,000 468 564 18.80

*La Grande

4,500 757 811 18.02

Bellingham 25.065 2,517 2,708 10.80 7.5

*Marysville

4,000 919 966 24.15

Berkeley

30,000 3,780 4,601 15.33 21.7

• Modesto

3,700 500 618 16.70

*Fresno

25,000 4,080 4,191 16.76 2.7

Monterey

4.500 382 404 8.98

Sacramento 37,500 4,642 5,001 13.34 7.7

*xMt. Vernon 4,500 322 324 7.20

xSan Diego

35,000 3,428 3.757 10.73 9.6

*Oroville

4,500 559 620 13.78

*San Jose

32,000 5,339 5,697 17.80 6.7

Red Bluff

3,800 350

364 9.58

Spokane

75,000 11,092 11,516 15.35

3.8

Redding

4,250 458 492 11.58

Tacoma

75,000 8,244 8,645 11.53 4.8

Richmond

3,500 375 442 12.63

Total or average.334,565 43,122

46,116 13.78 6.9 * Ritzville

3,000 425 468 15.60

*Roseburg

3,500 525 571 16.31

Group 3. (Population 10,000 to 25,000)

• Salinas

4,327 690

707 16.34

San Luis Obispo. 4.605 695 813 17.65

Aberdeen

10,154 735 969 9.54 31.8

San Mateo

4,000 511 374 14.35

Alameda

20,000 2,360 2.554 12.77 8.2

San Pedro

4,500 262 328

7.29

Astoria

11,500 801 836 7.27 4.3 *Santa Clara

4,500 358 374 8.31

Eureka

12,500 2.075 2,145 17.16 3.3 xThe Dalles

4,500 410 413 9.18

xEverett

20,000 2,029 2,052 10.26 1.1

Ukiah

3,000

296 310 10.33

xLong Beach 20,000 904 922 4.61 1.9

xVentura

3,500 389 420 12.00

*x Pasadena

23,000 4,483 4,634 20.15 3.3 *Woodland

3,500 661 697 19.91

xRedlands

10.000 614

640 6.40 4.2

Reno

13,202

10,000 1,330

Total or average .111.182

14.437 12.98

1,447 14.47 8.7

*xRiverside

11,500 2,001 2,104 18.29 5.1

xSan Bernardino. 12,000 1,004 1,067 8.89 6.2

Group 6. (Population less than 3000)

Santa Barbara 12,200 1,442 1.482 12.15 2.7

Santa Cruz

11,000 1,037 1,195 13.86

**Alhambra

15.2

361

2,500

426 17.04

Santa Rosa

10.030 789 911 9.11

15.4

XArcata

1.800

303

329 18.28

Stockton

22,00) 3,434 3,591 16.32 4.5

*Auburn

2.300 379 386 16.78

Vallejo

10,000 772 795 7.95 2.9

*Colfax.

2,550 783 790 30.98

Walla Walla 21,00) 2,185 2,286 10.89 4.6

*Cottage Grove.. 1,800 331 411 22.83

*Ferndale

1,600 345 349 21.81

Total or average .246,854 27,995 29,630 12.00 5.8

*Fullerton

2.000 332 375 18.75

*Glendale

1,500 275 374 24.93

Group 4. (Population 5,000 to 10,000)

* Healdsburg

2.300 331 373 16.22

Baker City

*Hood River

621

2,000

7,000

632 31.60

993 989 14.13 -.4

* Lodi

429

Bakersfield

2,000

8,005

500 25.00

1,769 1,820 22.75 2.8

Madera

2,200 312 314 14.27

*Centralia

6.000 245 301 5.01 22.8

•Marshfield

381

Chico

420 17.30

2.400

8,000 802 834 10.42 3.9

*Merced

2.500 453

*Eugene

484 19.36

7.000 1,036 1,231 17.58 18.8

*Grants Pass

McMinnville

294

5,000 351

2.000

404

316 15.80

8.08 15.1

*Grass Valley

xOntario

323

6.000

2,500

331 362 6.03

336 13.44

9.3

*Orange

Hanford

5,000

2,500 331

932

384 15.36

978 19.56 4.9

* Pomeroy

2.800

300

311 11.11

Hoquiam

8.000 458 511 6.39 11.5

* Porterville

380

2,135

405 18.97

xLewiston

5,000 799 888 17.76 11.0

6,500

Napa

655 69) 10.61 5.3

2.000

xPort Townsend.

469 489 24.45

•North Yakima 9.000 1,171 1,304 14.49 11.3

*Redwood City.. 2,500

266 301 12.04

*Olympia

7,500 951 1,094 14.59 15.0

•Santa Maria, 2,780

308

329 11.84

#xOregon City 5,000 480

539 10.78 12.2 *Selma

2.000 391 427 21.35

* Palo Alto

8,500 823

890 10.47 8.1 *xTulare

2,470

332 357 14.45

Pendleton

6.000 878

909 15.15 3.6

*xl'plands

1,015 335 391 38.52

Petaluma

5,500 796 834 15.16 4.8

Total or average 54,150 9 365

Phoenix

7,500

10.209 18.85

1.058 1.115.14.87 5.3

*Salem

8,000 1,588 1.859 23.24 17.0

San Rafael

ö.000 921 983 19.66 6.7

Summary

x Santa Ana

8,000 843 986 12.32 16.9

Group 1

990,000 105,142 119,842 12.10

x Santa Monica 8,000 807 934 11.67 15.7

Group 2

334,565 43,122 46.116 13.78

Tucson

8,000 896 959 11.99 7.0

Group 3

246,854 27,995 29.630 12.00

Vancouver

5,208 752 875 16.80 16.3 Group 4

172,708 21,949 23.916 13.84

• Visalia

5,000 946 966 19.32 2.1

Group 5

111,182 13,202 14.437 12.98

*Watsonville. 5,000 668 661 13.22 1.0 Group 6

54,150 9.365 10,209 18.85

Total or average .172,708 21,949 23,916 13.84 8.9

Totals ..1,909,459 220,775 244,150 12.78

* Many suburban subscribers connected. Exchanges having dual system. -Loss.

NOTE. --Seattle exchange gained 1375 subscribers by the absorption of Ballard.

Concrete Telegraph

Telegraph Poles

The Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago poles were erected were not of the best, division of the Pennsylvania Railroad is ex- as the work was rushed in order to have the perimenting with concrete poles for their tele- pole line complete for the date of a certain graph service. In the fall of 1906 they inspection trip. Because of this fact some erected a mile of these poles on their right of the poles were moved from the point of of way near Maples, Indiana, in order to building and were erected within five days test them out in actual service.

after they had been made. NotwithstandThey were built by Mr. Herman Tapp, ing this hurried method of construction and contractor of Fort Wayne, at Maples, In- the severity of the windstorms of the past diana, and were hauled out on cars to the winter, the poles show up at present in alpoint of erection. The profile of the ground most perfect condition. The alignment is of being somewhat uneven, the length of the the best, and the condition of the individual poles were varied from twenty-five to thirty- poles is very good, as no check marks or four feet, in order to keep the tops of the other signs of failure have appeared. The poles as nearly as possible on a continuous poles were set four feet under the ground grade. The poles were eight inches square and were bedded in stone screenings, giving at the bottom, and were tapered to a six-inch a solid foundation. Although the time these square at the top, the corners being cham- poles have been in use is not sufficient to fered two inches, making the pole appear warrant any sweeping statements as to their octagonal above the ground.

value, yet it is a fact that the first eight Holes were left for the brace and cross- months of service have certainly showed exarm bolts and also for the steps. The re- ceptional results in favor of the use of coninforcement consisted of twenty-four one- crete for this purpose.

These can probably quarter-inch wires running the full length of be put in at a cost of $8.00 per pole. — the pole. The conditions under which the Journal of Electricity, Power and Gas.

Telephones in Japan

When a Japanese dies in Tokio one of to possess a monopoly of—and this maxim the assets of his estate is his telephone, and is apparently true of Japan, though it is posthe privilege of taking over the dead sub- sible that the Japanese telephone system may scriber's instrument is worth, according to the be modernized. Boston Financial News, just $400 to his The great complaint in Japan is not so heirs.

much against the quality of the instruments The government of Japan is interested in and equipment of the systems as against the telephones for the reason that such instru- total inability of the government to supply ments of communication are a monopoly in service to all would-be subscribers. To get a the little empire-a government monopoly. telephone in Tokio a man either has to buy It is a fact of world-wide recognition that out a subscriber or wait his turn to secure an governments as a rule do not pay particular instrument, and there are no fewer than attention to industries which they may happen 8000 people on the waiting list ahead of

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him. The government is unable to supply at the rate of fifty cents per day, and the the demand, for the simple reason that it has nine-hour day has not yet been introduced not the instruments, and has not the working in Japan. force to install the telephones if it had them. Notwithstanding the fact the net earnings

In Japan telephones are rented to sub- from the telephone system of Tokio are very scribers at a flat rate; it makes no difference large and there is therefore every incentive for what purpose they are used. A tele- to supply as many customers as possible, the phone for a private house costs just as much government has so far found it impossible to as one for a business office. In the city of keep even with the demand. In Tokio alone Tokio, which has a population of a million it is estimated that some four years will and a half people, there are 22,000 tele- elapse before the government will be able to phone subscribers and thousands more who supply an instrument to the last man who would willingly give $100 to

puts his name on the waiting list. Of course accommodation.

many would-be subscribers die before their The cost of a telephone in Tokio is $40 turn comes, and the man has the doubtful per annum, and that is gold, not silver, and consolation of knowing that chance may the amount is payable strictly in advance. throw an epidemic of disease among those on While the receipts of the government from the waiting list, and, though he be spared, its telephone monopoly are large, the cost his chances of getting an instrument during of operations is comparatively light. For in- his lifetime are immeasurably increased by the stance, it pays its linemen, the best of them, deaths of the others.

secure

The Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company--

Operating Costs

Table showing operating cost-rank of exchanges of 300 subscribers or over, compiled from latest statistics, in most cases for May, 1907:

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A man

The same sort of folks live down in Ten- class a man as a ‘kicker' on telephone service, nessee or Mississippi and out in California, you are the father of the kicker.' or Washington, or Oregon, and for this rea- does not kick on telephone service when you son the following short extract from an ad- give him telephone service, and instead of dress by Ernest M. Fisher, superintendent showing disrespect to the kicker,' he is the of traffic for the Cumberland Telephone and

man that you should respect. He is soundTelegraph Company, before officers and

ing the warning note to you that there is Mississippi managers at Jackson, Miss., is

something in your service that is wrong and

should be corrected, and he has discovered especially pertinent. If

every manager

it. Now the company has furnished thouadopted Mr. Fisher's policy and tried his

sands of dollars with which to buy apparatus system on every complainer every time the

for rendering the service, and so it is not results would be surprising. Here is what

the company's fault if the service is not what Mr. Fisher said:

it should be. That man has found that you "In rendering telephone service we have

are not doing something that you ought to three classes of people to deal with—the do. He is the barometer that is measuring long-suffering, the patient, and the im

you; and instead of heaping abuse on that patient. Sometimes we are prone to believe

man, you should go out and take him by the that we have discovered another class that hand and thank him for his courtesy in callwe might terms 'kickers,' and we don't speak ing your attention to the fact that there is that word with the very greatest respect; we something wrong with the service, that you think the 'kicker' is pretty much in the same have overlooked something, and that you incategory as the “knocker.' I want to tell tend to remedy the trouble immediately, and you in all earnestness that wherever you can then do it."

Public Ownership of Telephones

European Cities and Countries Find Actual Experience Dissappointing

The franchise of the Chicago Telephone For one thing, the city council determined Company (Bell) expires in 1909, and the early in the fight not to consider the question city of Chicago is in the throes of a tele- without adequate information, and for this phone fight. The situation is interesting the reason engaged Walter F. Burgess, a telecitizens and it appears likely that more in- phone expert, to provide detailed information

, telligent consideration of the claims of the as to the experiences of other cities with the incumbent company and the company which telephone problem. Mr. Burgess's report is seeks to succeed it will be given than is of especial interest at this time, when municiusually the case in such matters.

pal ownership is being agitated in many

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