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PROCEEDINGS.

The undersigned, a Committee appointed at a meeting of a large number of the citizens of Baltimore, held at the Law Buildings, on the evening of the 27th of December, 1860, in obedience to the resolutions passed at said meeting, and in response to the request of a large number of our citizens, hereby respectfully invite all the friends of the Union, in the City of Baltimore, to attend a Mass Meeting of the Friends of the Union, to be held at the Maryland Institute on Thursday, the 10th day of January, 1861, at 7 o'clock, P. M.

It is expected that said meeting will be addressed by distinguished and eloquent speakers.

WILLIAM H. COLLINS,
WILLIAM MCKIM,
B. DEFORD,
WILLIAM E. HOOPER,
JOSEPH CUSHING, JR.

Committee. Under the instructions of this Committee, Wm. McKIM nominated as

OFFICERS OF THE MEETING.

PRESIDENT:
ARCHIBALD STIRLING.

VICE-PRESIDENTS :
JOHN B. MORRIS,

JOHN P. KENNEDY,
GALLOWAY CHESTON, WILLIAM HEALD,
THOMAS KELSO,

COLUMBUS O'DONNELL,
HENRY MAY,

THOMAS SWANN,
JOHN J. ABRAHAMS,

WILLIAM COOKE,
JAMES C. SKINNER,

CHARLES A. GAMBRILL,
MOSES WIESENFIELD,

LEWIS TURNER,
JAMES HOOPER, JR.

WILLIAM WOODWARD,
JOHNS HOPKINS,

HENRY D. HARVEY,
JAMES MULLLER,

ENOCH PRATT,
CHARLES F. MAYER,

JOHN B. SEIDENSTRICKER,
SAMUEL J. K. HANDY.

C. L. L. LEARY,

SECRETARIES:

CHARLES A. GRINNELL.

The nominations of the Committee were accepted by the meeting with enthusiastic unanimity.

REMARKS OF ARCHIBALD STIRLING, ESQ. Gentlemen,-Before proceeding to the business of the evening, I beg leave to thank you for the honor you have done me, in calling me to preside.

While I regret that some one, possessed of more experience in such matters, has not been selected, I accept your call with pride and pleasure.

I consider the object of this meeting, to preserve and perpetuate the Union, as one that ought to be dearer to every patriotic breast, than property or life; and should the proceedings of this meeting aid in stilling the storm that beats around us, and in arresting the progress of secession, I shall ever regard my humble participation as the happiest event of

my life. Gentlemen, I mean not to detain you by any attempt to make a speech. That, as you all know, is not my vocation.

A Committee was appointed at your preliminary meeting at the Law Buildings to prepare the measures of business for this meeting. That Committee has prepared resolutions to be submitted for your consideration, and have invited Gentlemen to address you on these resolutions:

SPEECH OF WM. H. COLLINS, ESQ. Mr. Chairman,-I have been instructed by the Committee in charge of the resolutions to be presented to this meeting, to say a few words before offering them for consideration. Will I be pardoned if I do so ?

Mr. Chairman, we are in perilous times. Our country is in danger; not from any foreign power, (for that we would know full well how to meet,) but from discontent and distrust amongst ourselves. It is the conviction of this danger, together with a deep-rooted love for our common country, which has brought you, as also this vast audience, here tonight. I say for our common country.

Mr. Chairman and Citizens of Baltimore, may I ask, What is our country?

Is it the State of Maryland, with her noble Bay and beautiful Rivers piercing and blessing her two Shores? Is it her plains and uplands, her mountains and valleys, her thriving cities, and towns, and villages ? Is it her healthful climate and productive soil, her free institutions, her people of a brave and vigorous stock? Is it our own beautiful city, with its industry, its thrift and its skill, its love of order, its comfortable homes, its throngs of loving wives and beautiful daughters, of manly husbands, and fathers and sons? Are these our country? No, sir. Maryland is a pure and bright star in our constellation. There may she ever remain! True, faithful, loyal and brave, we love her as our own bright, particular star. She is our home, and we will watch over her welfare and honor with filial affection. This is natural; it is right, it is loyal.

But, Mr. Chairman and People of Baltimore, Maryland is not our country. She is but a part of it, though a dear and treasured part. She has an area of but ten thousand square miles, whilst our country contains three millions. She has less than a million of people, whilst our country numbers thirty millions.

People of Baltimore, our country, our true country, extends from the great lakes of the North to the Gulf of Mexico and the Rio Grande in the sunny regions of the South; and from the resounding shores of the Atlantic, over lowlands and mountains, and valleys, and rivers and plains, to the Pacific, where we look out upon China and Japan.

This, this is our country, the noblest, the grandest heritage which God has ever granted to one people. Capable of containing, and soon to be inhabited by a hundred millions of brave sons, this our country, if she prove true to our glorious Union, is destined to be the happiest, the greatest and the freest nation that by its great deeds has ever fired the poet's song, or lent eloquence to the flowing page of history. In arms, in arts, in wealth, in patriotism, in liberty, in science and in moral power, she will be the foremost nation of the world. This, Mr. Chairman and FellowCitizens, is the grand and glorious country to which we this night offer the devotion, the undying love of our

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