Aids to diagnosis. v.1, 1881, Volume 1

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Baillière, Tindall & Cox, 1881
 

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Page 72 - A' made a finer end and went away an it had been any christom* child; a' parted even just between twelve and one, even at the turning o' the tide: for after I saw him fumble with the sheets and play with flowers and smile upon his fingers...
Page 65 - To be willing to perform our duty is the moral part ; to know how to perform it is the intellectual part : while the closer these two parts are knit together, the greater the harmony with which they work ; and the more...
Page 69 - The physician is liable to be misled by placing too much reliance on the laws of temperature. They are not infrequently interfered with by complications and accidental events. As an illustration, a young girl had passed through typhoid fever, convalescence being declared, in connection with other symptoms, by the laws of thermometry belonging to the decline of fever or defervescence in this disease. Suddenly hysterical symptoms were manifested, and the temperature rose to 105°. The physician, a...
Page 69 - With regard to the information furnished by the thermometer, as well as other diagnostic symptoms, it is to be borne in mind that there are exceptions to rules which are generally applicable.' It is in the female sex that these neurosal disturbances are usually manifested. At the catamenial week of the menstrual cycle, temperature perturbations are common, and a pyrexia, for which there is no apparent cause, may at these times cause unnecessary alarm.
Page 41 - The food, in passing along the alimentary canal is subjected to the action of certain juices which are the products of the secretory activity of the epithelium cells of the alimentary mucous membrane itself, or of the glands which belong to it. These juices (vis., saliva, gastric juice, bile, pancreatic juice, succus entericus, and the secretion of the large intestine), poured upon and mingling with...
Page 24 - Owing to their smallness, their sides do not touch, and interspaces are leftIt is, however, the upper central incisors which are the most reliable for purposes of diagnosis. When the other teeth are affected these very rarely escape, and very often they are malformed when all the others are of fairly good shape. The characteristic malformation of the upper central incisors consists in a dwarfing of the tooth, which is usually both narrow and short, and in the atrophy of its middle lobe. This atrophy...
Page 42 - These juices (viz., saliva, gastric juice, bile, pancreatic juice, succus entericus, and the secretion of the large intestine,) poured upon and mingling with the food, produce in it such changes, that from being largely insoluble it becomes largely soluble in an alkaline fluid such as blood, or otherwise modify it in such a way that the larger portion of what is eaten passes into the blood, either directly by means of the capillaries of the alimentary canal, or indirectly by means of the lacteal...
Page 40 - raw" or "bare" tongue. This condition of the tongue has not, in my experience, received from medical writers a tithe of the attention it deserves to have paid to it. Here the superficial structures of the tongue are denuded, more or less completely, of the natural epithelium. In convalescence from acute conditions, where the tongue has been coated, sometimes the tongue is abnormally red and imperfectly covered with epithelium, and here a coat is apt to form again (Flint). Both in acute or chronic...
Page 7 - The knowledge that a man can use is the only real knowledge; the only knowledge that has life and growth in it and converts itself into practical power. The rest hangs like dust about the brain, or dries like raindrops off the stones.
Page 25 - The appended woodcut illustrates a good example of the deformity. In any case in which the malformation was as marked as in this sketch, I should feel no hesitation in pronouncing the possessor of the teeth to be the subject of inherited Syphilis even in the absence of other testimony. I have never yet seen such teeth, excepting in patients of this class. In the majority of cases, however, the condition of the teeth is sufficient only to excite suspicion and not to decide the question. In a few rare...

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