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JOHN MUIR AMONG THE PINES "Sun-fed mountaineers rejoicing in their strength, chanting with the winds, in accord with the falling waters."Our National Parks

Photo by Geo. R. King

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PENCIL SKETCHES OF TOTEMS FROM THE OLD STICKEEN VILLAGE

FROM JOHN MUIR'S ALASKA NOTEBOOKS

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A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF JOHN MUIR*

BY JENNIE ELLIOT DORAN

This bibliography is an attempt to present an annotated list, complete, with the exception of newspaper articles, of John Muir's writings and of works about him. The arrangement of material is alphabetical under the different headings—Muir's writings being followed by the works about him.

For assistance in the preparation of this list thanks are due Professor C. B. Bradley of the University of California, for the use of his "Reference List to the Published Writings of John Muir,” published in 1897† Earlier lists published in the Overland Monthly by E. A. Avery and W. T. Kittredge have also been used.

HONORS
A. M., Harvard University, 1896.
LL. D., University of Wisconsin, 1897.

Litt. D., Yale University, 1911.

LL. D., University of California, 1913.
Member, American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Member, Washington Academy of Science.
Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

President, Sierra Club.

President, American Alpine Club. *[Note.-This bibliography is a thesis for graduation from the Library School of the University of Wisconsin, prepared by Miss Doran in June, 1915, under the supervision of Miss Mary Emogene Hazeltine, Preceptor of the school. Miss Doran had found some help in her work from the use of a Reference List made by me in 1897, and on completing it was good enough to remember me with a copy of her manuscript. Being myself under promise to the editor to furnish a bibliography for the forthcoming Muir Memorial number of the SIERRA CLUB BULLETIN, I was of course overjoyed to find the work thus done to my hand, and, as appeared on ex. amination, so well done that very little was left for me to do save to add the publications which have appeared since Miss Doran completed her work, and a few older ones which have recently come to my notice, together with an occasional note of information which seemed worthy of being included in the record. All material so added by me has been included within square brackets. An asterisk indicates that the reference has not been personally verified because the publication itself was not available for verification either in Madison or here in California.

Both Miss Doran and her preceptor have kindly consented to its publication here. And it seems in every way fitting that this—which seems likely to be the definite bibliography-should be the work of a student of John Muir's own university, and should be published by the Sierra Club with which he was ever increasingly identi. fied from its very beginning to the day on which he left us.

CORNELIUS BEACH BRADLEY. January 15, 1916.)

University of California Magazine, December, 1897.

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BIBLIOGRAPHIES Avery, E. A. Bibliography of John Muir. Overland, Oct.,

1885, v. 6, p. 445-446. Bradley, C. B. Reference List to the Published Writings of

John Muir. Berkeley, University of California, 1898.

From the University of California Magazine, Dec., 1897. Kittredge, W.T. Bibliography of John Muir. Overland, Oct.,

1886. v. 8, p. 441-442. A revision of the bibliography published by E. A. Avery in Overland, Oct., 1885, v. 6, p. 445-446. San Francisco Public Library. Writings of John Muir. Bulletin, Feb. 1902, v. 8, p. 19.

BOOKS BY MUIR Edward Henry Harriman. Doubleday, 1912. Gratis to libra

ries. "Enumerates the characteristics that made Harriman a fundamental and progressive factor in the financial world, and no less among his fellow men.Book Review Digest.

Reviewed in Dial, June 1, 1912, v. 52, p. 442.
Letters to a friend. Houghton, 1915. 300 copies, $3.00.

“They were written in the impressionable years of early manhood, soon after their writer had completed his four years of unprescribed studies at the University of Wisconsin.” Dial.

Reviewed in Dial, April 15, 1915, v. 58, p. 294-295, by P. F. Bicknell; N. Y. Times, April 18, 1915, v. 20, p. 144, by Hildegarde Haw

thorne. Mountains of California. Century, 1894. $1.50. New and en

larged edition, 1911. “We have here nature pure and unadulterated sixteen chapters, each a gem of landscape or animal painting.” Nation.

Reviewed in Athenæum, Jan. 19, 1895, P: 77-78; Dial, Feb. I, 1895, v. 18, p. 75-77, by A. M. Earle; Nation, Nov. 15, 1894, v. 59, p. 366367.

The book is chiefly made up of articles, revised and enlarged, which appeared in Century and Scribner's Monthly under the following titles and dates : Bee-pastures of California. Century, June-July, 1882, v. 24, p. 222

229, 388-396.
Coniferous Forests of the Sierra Nevada. Scribner's Monthly,

Sept., 1881, v. 22, p. 710-723, 921-931.
Douglass (Douglas) Squirrel of California. Scribner's Monthly,

Dec., 1878, v. 17, p. 260-266.
Glacier Meadows of the Sierra. Scribner's Monthly, Feb., 1879, v.

17, P. 478-483.
Humming-bird of the California Waterfalls. Scribner's Monthly,

Feb., 1878, v. 15, p. 545-554.
In the Heart of the California Alps. Scribner's Monthly, July,

1880, v. 20, p. 345-352.
Mountain Lakes of California. Scribner's Monthly, Jan., 1879, v.

17, p. 411-420.

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Passes of the Sierra. Scribner's Monthly, March, 1879, v. 17, p.

644-652
Wild Sheep of the Sierra. Scribner's Monthly, May, 1881, v. 22, p.

I-II.
Wind Storm in the Forests of the Yuba. Scribner's Monthly, Nov.,

1878, v. 17, p. 55-59.
My First Summer in the Sierra. Houghton, 1911. $2.50.

"As a revelation of the glory and freedom of the out-of-doors' exemplified in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in and about the Yosemite Valley, Mr. Muir's narrative of his first impressions in those regions is most charming and refreshing.Dial.

Reviewed in A. L. A. Booklist, Sept., 1911, v. 8, p. 25; Dial, Oct. I, 1911, v. 51, p. 251-252, by C. A. Kofoid; Literary Digest, Aug. 5, 1911, v. 43, p. 216; Nation, June 29, 1911, v. 92, p. 651; N. Y. Times, June II, 1911, v. 16, 6. 374; Review of Reviews, July, 1911, v. 44, p. 123.

Enlarged from sketches published in the Atlantic, Jan.-April, 1911, V. 107, p. 1-11, 170-181, 339-349, 521-528. Our National Parks. Houghton, 1901. $1.75. New and en

larged edition, 1909. $3.00. “Throughout this volume there is a mixture of aesthetic appreciation, scientific knowledge, and personal adventure that gives it a unique charm." Nation.

Reviewed in Dial, March 1, 1902, v. 32, p. 163-164; Nation, April 10, 1902, v. 74, p. 294-295.

The book is made up of sketches published in the Atlantic under the following titles and dates:

American Forests. Aug., 1897, v. 80, p. 145-157.
Among the Animals of the Yosemite. Nov., 1898, v. 82, p. 617-631.
Among the Birds of the Yosemite. Dec., 1898, v. 82, p. 751-760.
Forests of Yosemite. April, 1900, v. 85, p. 493-507.
Fountains and Streams of Yosemite National Park. April, 1901, v.

87, P: 556-565.
Hunting Big Redwoods. Sept., 1901, v. 88, p. 304-320.
Wild Gardens of the Yosemite Park. Aug., 1900, v. 86, p. 167-179.
Wild Parks and Forest Reservations of the West. Jan., 1898, v. 81,

P. 15-28.
Yellowstone National Park, April, 1898, v. 81, p. 509-522.

Yosemite National Park. Aug., 1899, v. 84, p. 145-152.
Stickeen. Houghton, 1909. 6oc. New edition, 1914. 250. (Riv-

erside literature series.) "Relates the narrow escape of the explorer and his faithful dog companion during a storm in the glacier country.” A. L. A. Booklist.

Reviewed in A. L. A. Booklist, May, 1909, v. 5, p. 149; Nation, July 8, 1909, v. 89, p. 37; N. Y. Times, April 3, 1909, v. 14, p. 197; Review of Reviews, Aug., 1909, v. 40, p. 253.

Enlarged from a sketch published in Century, Sept. 1897, v. 54, p. 769-776, under the title “An Adventure with a Dog and a Glacier." Story of My Boyhood and Youth. Houghton, 1913. $2.00.

"The author's adventures as a wholesome, nature-loving boy in a strict Presbyterian home in Scotland, his emigration to America, his interest in the domestic animals and wild life about his home in Wisconsin, . . . his enthusiasm as an inventor, and his life at the Univer

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