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money loaned or borrowed. They were told that best schools as the most promising solution offered a certain part of the family income belonged to to the perplexing problem of secondary education. them, and it was given them under the term of This Committee, and the men influenced by its “wages.” Why the term was used is not made work have united to find better and more unified clear. If it belonged to them, it was not wages; courses of study. To accomplish this, other bodies if they did not work for it, it was not wages; and organized for educational purposes have been confusion must have arisen in the minds of these asked to co-operate with the Committee to deterchildren when they were paid for doing services mine what should constitute“ a normal requirein play hours. The writer of the article gives the ment in each of the subjects set for admission to following answers to questions submitted : college.” With Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler as Ought children to have an allowance?--Yes.

head of this Committee, the importance of the Should children be paid for domestic services ? ---No. study of English in the primary and secondary Should children save money for the sake of accumulating ?-Yes.

school would receive its due weight of attention. Are school savings-banks desirable ?-No.

A special Committee of Fifteen, with Professor Should children save to get some important things, as F. H. Stoddard, of the New York University, as a bicycle ?-Yes. Should work in arithmetic be adjusted so as to develop leading school-masters and teachers of English in

Chairman, sent out a list of forty-four books to the children's sense of money values 2-Yes.

Should children be early given a sense of the economic colleges, with ten requests, among them one that value of their clothes, books, etc. ?-Yes.

will interest especially those parents who are inShould children be encouraged to give money to or. ganizations removed from their own inner life, such as

terested in the subject of supplementary school missionary societies ?-Not at first; this will come later.

reading, and the kind of books that are accepted The reason for disapproving of school savings. by authorities as means to culture: banks is not a sound one, as the act of deposit

9. Please mark with a cross the books in the following money in a school savings-bank is never

ing list that you have found desirable, with a double

cross those that you have found especially desirable, compulsory; the Penny Provident Fund repre with a circle those that you have found unsatisfactory, sents the voluntary savings of individuals and with a double circle those that you have found especially families, and is accepted as one of the active

unsatisfactory. elevating influences of our day, hundreds of fami The following summary is the reply lies learning the blessing of even a small margin. School is not, in my judgment, the place for savings. Abbot, The.......

94 12 203 banks. There children are taught obedience, and the

American Scholar

87 39 27 9 lesson taught by saving, if considered compulsory by Ancient Mariner..

121 83 8 6 them, would be followed only when they were under the As You Like It......

98 119 6 2 eye of a teacher. In order to learn the lesson properly

Comus

92 56 44 the saving should be a voluntary act on the part of the Courtship of Miles Standish. 116 88 8 child.

David Copperfield..

96 53 21 3 The act of giving money for missions, for instance, Essay on Burns...

86 41 19 follows naturally after giving to poor or beggars en Essays on Milton and Addison .. 100 65

24 4 countered in every-day life.

Evangeline .....

117 122 5

First Bunker Hill Oration. 105 104 9 1 A child should see the object of its inter

Flight of a Tartar Tribe... 55 13 26 12 est, or should be able through experience to ap. History of the Plague.

31 6 55 123

House of the Seven Gables. preciate for what it is giving its money. A child

105 77 13 4 Pope's Iliad..

57 30 3) 23 can appreciate the benefit of giving money for

Il Penseroso.......

105 80 298 underwear for a child who is ill, or the pleasure Ivanhoe ....

86 126 S flowers will give, or an excursion, or a vacation. Julius Cæsar.

76 171

Lady of the Lake.... To have a child send its money into a world

130 103 2 L'Allegro ..

99 85 28 8 beyond its comprehension, or for a purpose its Last of the Mohicans...

72 34 29 3 imagination cannot grasp, does not train the child Life of Nelson

12 25 13 to true generosity, and this accounts for the lack Life of Samuel Johnson... 89 55

18 4 Lycidas

73 45 of personal interest in many adults, that is so

Macbeth..

88 106 10 2 necessary to true giving.

Marmion..

113 82 12 Merchant of Venice..

5C 217
Midsummer Night's Dream... 113 61 16

Palamon and Arcite...
An Authoritative List of Books

30 3

19 Paradise Lost, Books I. and II... 81 53

25 18 Princess..

80 One of the signs of progress in education is the

63

22 4

74 Second Essay on Chatham...

20

46 disposition of leading schoolmasters through

Sketch Book...

110 130 6 out the country to co-operate to establish so far

Silas Marner..

91 128 11 as possible a uniform basis of work, founded on Sir Roger de Coverley Papers...

99 107 16 experience and scholarly investigation as to the

Sohrab and Rustum...

81 50

Conciliation with America. ...... 94 76 19 best courses of study in all branches of knowl

Tales of a Traveler..

48 edge; to establish courses of study that will be Twelfth Night.....

94 43 accepted as authoritative by parents. In a meas

Twice-Told Tales ..

97 75 ure this has been accomplished. The report of

Vicar of Wakefield..

92 65 Vision of Sir Launfal...........

85 136 3 the Committee of Ten has been accepted by the Woodstock

102 29

6

67

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The Ed tors have hoped to compile a hymnal that is hitherto unequaled.and.t is not to be denied that they have succeeded, and that nobly —THE INTERIOR.

The
Plymouth
Hymnal

The Plymouth

Hymnal

EDITED BY LYMAN ABBOTT
With the Co-operation of Herbert Vaughan Abbott

and Chas. H. Morse is eminenily adapted for use in Churches, Colleges, Schools, Social Meetings, and the Home

Rev. Theodore P. Prudden, West New Professor George C. Gow, Vassar College, ton, Mass.: "Both hymns and music get hold Poughkeepsie, N. Y.: "The Plymouth Hymnal of people. The congregational singing has im was our choice out of several admirable books. proved. While there is an abundance of old Every tune is singable. It gives me pleasure to hymns and tunes, we find the new hymns are a recommend the Plymouth Hymnal for college most admirable expression of devout feeling, and the new music is attractive, easily learned,

Professor Edward S. Parsons, Colorado sung with enthusiasm, and united in by many

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. : «

The who did not join in the old tunes."

use of its noble hymns and tunes will bring a Rev. B. S. Rideout, Norway, Me: “We new influence into our College worship, and so have only words of the highest praise for it. It into the lives of our students in the present and is a splendidly gotten up book in every way.

the future. Such a book cannot be outgrown. The longer we use it the better we like it." We shall rather hope to grow up to it." Write to us for specimen pages. If you are a pastor, teacher, or choirmaster, we

shall be glad to send a FREE (returnable) copy to you for examination.

use."

The Plymouth Sunday-School Hymnal

Edited by Thomas G. Shearman and Walton N. Ellis

With an Introduction by Lyman Abbott

Rev. Amory H. Bradford, First Congre Mr. Louis C. Elson, New England Congational Church, Montclair, N. J., says: “I servatory of Music, says: "I think it one of the have examined with great delight the Plymouth best Sunday-school Hymnals I have yet seen, Sunday-school Hymnal. In my opinion it is Such a book will do much to drive out the one of the very best hymn-books that has ever trashy and jingly effusions, miscalled hymns, been prepared in our country. Its chief excel that too often constitute the basis of sacred col lence is in the fact that, while it is simple enough lections for youth.” for children, its hymns are of so high an order Rev. Washington Gladden, Columbus, that the older people can enjoy them. It is a Ohio, writes : “I have looked over the Sundaybook that will not soon wear out, and it seems school Hymnal pretty carefully, and most cordito me suitable for the prayer-meeting as well as ally commend it as an admirable selection of the Sunday-school.”

both hymns and tunes.” This Hymnal is in use in many Sunday-schools, and is an ideal book for children. It is beautifully printed and handsomely bound. Send for specimen

pages. A free (returnable) copy will be sent to any

pastor or superintendent for examination.
THE OUTLOOK CO., 13 Astor Place, New York

[graphic]

bests to the This work cours orgar asked mine ment colle head stud schoc

A SF

money loaned or borrowed. They were told that
a certain part of the family income belonged to
them, and it was given them under the term of
“wages.” Why the term was used is not made
clear. If it belonged to them, it was not wages;
if they did not work for it, it was not wages; and
confusion must have arisen in the minds of these
children when they were paid for doing services
in play hours. The writer of the article gives the
following answers to questions submitted :
Ought children to have an allowance?--Yes.
Should children be paid for domestic services ?-No.

Should children save money for the sake of accumulating ?-Yes.

Are school savings-banks desirable ?- No. Should children save to get some important things, as a bicycle ?-Yes.

Should work in arithmetic be adjusted so as to develop children's sense of money values ?-Yes.

Should children be early given a sense of the economic value of their clothes, books, etc. ?-Yes.

Should children be encouraged to give money to or. ganizations removed from their own inner life, such as missionary societies ?-Not at first; this will come later.

The reason for disapproving of school savingsbanks is not a sound one, as the act of depositing money in a school savings-bank is never compulsory; the Penny Provident Fund represents the voluntary savings of individuals and families, and is accepted as one of the active elevating influences of our day, hundreds of families learning the blessing of even a small margin.

School is not, in my judgment, the place for savingsbanks. There children are taught obedience, and the lesson taught by saving, if considered compulsory by them, would be followed only when they were under the eye of a teacher. In order to learn the lesson properly the saving should be a voluntary act on the part of the child.

The act of giving money for missions, for instance, follows naturally after giving to poor or beggars encountered in every-day life.

A child should see the object of its interest, or should be able through experience to ap. preciate for what it is giving its money. A child can appreciate the benefit of giving money for underwear for a child who is ill, or the pleasure flowers will give, or an excursion, or a vacation. To have a child send its money into a world beyond its comprehension, or for a purpose its imagination cannot grasp, does not train the child to true generosity, and this accounts for the lack of personal interest in many adults, that is so necessary to true giving.

F. H Chai leadi colle will teres readi by al

9. I ing cross with with unsat

Tb

Abbo
Amer
Ancie
As Y
Comu
Court
Davi
Essay
Essay
Evan
First
Fligh
Histo
Hous
Pope
Il Per
Ivanh
Julius
Lady
L'All
Last
Life c
Life
Lycid
Macb
Marm
Merch
Midsu
Palar
Parad
Princ
Secor
Sketc
Silas
Sir R
Sohra
Conci
Tales
Twel
Twice
Vicar
Visio
Wooc

An Authoritative List of Books One of the signs of progress in education is the disposition of leading schoolmasters throughout the country to co-operate to establish so far as possible a uniform basis of work, founded on experience and scholarly investigation as to the best courses of study in all branches of knowledge; to establish courses of study that will be accepted as authoritative by parents. In a measure this has been accomplished. The report of the Committee of Ten has been accepted by the

[graphic]

sents the voluntary savings of individuals and with a double circle those that you kiss

money loaned or borrowed. They were told that best schools as the most promicing elitiza
a certain part of the family income belonged to
them, and it was given them under the term of This Committee, and the men inte

to the perplexing problem of secondary
"wages." Why the term was used is not made work have united to find better under
clear. If it belonged to them, it was not wages; courses of study. To accomplisi di den
if they did not work for it, it was not wages; and organized for educational purpos de
confusion must have arisen in the minds of these asked to co-operate with the Comet
children when they were paid for doing services mine what shonid constitute's mortals
in play hours. The writer of the article gives the ment in each of the subjects se larte
following answers to questions submitted :

college." With Dr. Nicholas Maryle
Ought children to have an allowance? –Yes. head of this Committee, the impat
Should children be paid for domestic services ?–No. study of English in the primary at
Should children save money for the sake of accumu- school would receive its due weight is
lating ?-Yes.
Are school savings-banks desirable ?-No.

A special Committee of Fiften, alles
Should children save to get some important things, as F.H. Stoddard, of the New York Time

i a bicycle ?--Yes.

Chairman, sent out a list of fortykoncebido Should work in arithmetic be adjusted so as to develop leading school masters and teaches die children's sense of money values 1-Yes.

Should children be early given a sense of the economic colleges, with ten requests, among os. value of their clothes, books, etc.?-Yes.

will interest especially those partes do Should children be encouraged to give money to or. terested in the subject of supple.com ganizations removed from their own inner life, such as

* proved. While there is an a missionary societies? –Not at first; this will come later. reading, and the kind of books that are

The reason for disapproving of school savings.
banks is not a sound one, as the act of deposit ing list that you have found desiale
ing money in a school savings-bank is never cross those that you have found estil
compulsory; the Penny Provident Fund repre- with a circle those that you have found

unsatisfactory.
families, and is accepted as one of the active
elevating influences of our day, hundreds of fami-
lies learning the blessing of even a small margin.

Churches, Colleges

Rey. Theodore P. Prudd ton, Mass.: Both hymns and of people. The congregationa hymns and tunes, we find the most admirable expression of and the new music is attractiv sung with enthusiasm, and un who did not join in the old tun

Rev. B. S. Rideout, Noi have only words of the highest

is a splendidly gotten up boo * The longer we use it the better Write to us for specimen

shall be glad to send

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The Plymou

The following summary is the reply
School is not, in my judgment, the place for savings- Abbot, The...........
banks. There children are taught obedience, and the
lesson taught by saving, if considered compulsory by

American Scholar
them, would be followed only when they were under the

Ancient Mariner.....

As You Like It...
eye of a teacher. In order to learn the lesson properly Comus
the saving should be a voluntary act on the part of the Courtship of Miles Standish .....
child.

David Copperfield.
The act of giving money for missions, for instance, Essay on Burns....
follows naturally after giving to poor or beggars en- Essays on Milton and Addison ..
countered in every-day life.

Evangeline
A child should see the object of its inter- Flight of a Tartar Tribe...

First Bunker Hill Oration.......
est, or should be able through experience to ap. History of the Plague...
preciate for what it is giving its money. A child House cf the Seven Gables...
can appreciate the benefit of giving money for

Pope's Iliad..

Il Penseroso..
underwear for a child who is ill, or the pleasure Ivanhoe ....
flowers will give, or an excursion, or a vacation. Julius Cæsar,
To have a child send its money into a world Lady of the Lake..
beyond its comprehension, or for a purpose its Last of the Mohicans......
imagination cannot grasp, does not train the child Life of Nelson .....
to true generosity, and this accounts for the lack Life of Samuel Johnson....

Lycidas
of personal interest in many adults, that is so

Macbeth..
necessary to true giving.

Marmion.....
Merchant of Venice..
Midsummer Night's Dream......

Palamon and Arcite.....
An Authoritative List of Books

Paradise Lost, Books I and II..
One of the signs of progress in education is the Princess....

Second Essay on Chatham .....
disposition of leading schoolmasters through- Sketch Book...
out the country to co-operate to establish so far Silas Marner...........
as possible a uniform basis of work, founded on

Sohrab and Rustum......
experience and scholarly investigation as to the
best courses of study in all branches of knowl. Tales of a Traveler...
edge; to establish courses of study that will be Twelfth Night..........

Twice-Told Tales.............
accepted as authoritative by parents. In a meas-

Vicar of Wakefield.
are this has been accomplished. The report of Vision of Sir Launfal ......
the Committee of Ten has been accepted by the Woodstock ...........

Edited by The

With a Rev. Amory H. Bradford gational Church, Montclair, 1 have examined with great delig Sunday-school Hymnal. Inn one of the very best hymn-boo been prepared in our country, lence is in the fact that, while it for children, its hymns are of so that the older people can enjo book that will not soon wear ou to me suitable for the prayer.me the Sunday-school." This Hymnal is in use in

It is beautifully prir

pages. A

pastor

THE OUTLOO

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