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" Amen

Welshman, and the American artist Mr. Boughton,

goes, v who is an Englishman. One more criticism. Darwin thought the earthworm important enough to write a book about it. Mr. Skinner says no place is without earthworms. Now, I want to say that there are no earthworms where there are no settlements of men. Forty years ago you

To the E

I have might have dug all day in the Saginaw Valley Mary H. and you could not find an earthworm; to-day a facile p

uct of he one spadeful of earth has enough for a day's fish

attractin ing. When I lived at St. Ignace, people used to

no incon send to Petosky, thirty miles away, and buy angle try the worms because you could not find them in a new

More tha

ciate wit settlement; and in southern Michigan you could

cious ha not find them far away from the farm-house. The bound, if earthworm follows man, never goes before him. to abstai This may seem like hypercriticism, but it is just if a more

-and thi such small facts taken notice of that wrote the

administ “ Origin of Species "and" The Descent of Man." the strea

W.G. PUDDEFOOT. It is, per! Cottage City, Mass.

fessedly
(p. 214),

clusions ; For a Good Navy

the resul To the Editors of The Outlook :

against I have, if I mistake not, read editorials in The

preconce

try wher Outlook very seriously deprecating such things might le: as the development of our navy and the perfect will, it st ing of our harbor defenses, on the twofold ground

or rathe

lute relia that they are (1) expensive and (2) unnecessary For ex unnecessary because it is for the interests of the nical mi country to be at peace. Personally I have not pentering agreed with this position on the part of The

binding,

named, Outlook, and I therefore take the liberty of calling

Granti attention to a passage from the “ Personal Mem analysis oirs of U. S. Grant,” Vol. II., pp. 547, 548. Grant,

“civiliza

of the na I believe, is universally allowed to have been a great advocate for peace; and his judgment both

the onca of men and measures in military matters, as is quite tru

the exist shown by his book, was wonderfully direct and

Listen clear-sighted.

aries hav He says in the passage referred to:

useless ;) To maintain peace in the future it is necessary to be

the chief prepared for war. There can scarcely be a possible

are descr chance of a conflict, such as the last one, occurring

least. 1 among our own people again; but, growing as we are

West Co in population, wealth, and military power, we may

that the become the envy of nations which led us in all these

establish particulars only a tew years ago ; and unless we are pre

missiona pared for it we may be in danger of a combined move

both the ment being some day made to crush us out. Now,

Africa, a scarcely twenty years after the war, we seem to have for

the adva gotten the lessons it taught, and are going on as if in the

the Afric greatest security, without the power to resist an invasion

bad whit by the fleets of fourth-rate European powers for a time,

scription until we could prepare for them.

lady or We should have a good navy, and our seacoast

Again defenses should be put in the finest possible condition.

Africa i Neither of these cost much when it is considered where

neither the money goes, and what we get in return. Money

chased e expended in a fine navy not only adds to our security

Again and tends to prevent war in the future, but is very

for the material aid to our commerce with foreign nations in

of the A: the meantime. Money spent upon seacoast defenses is Again spent among our own people, and all goes back again man na among the people. The work accomplished, too, like

school te that of the navy, gives us a feeling of security.

I could

Would There is a large number of people in this coun

the insi try, who by no means deserve the name of Jin Miss Ki

this was

great advocate for peace; and his judgment both the oncoming of a sugerir mitt
of men and measures in military matters, as is quite true that the missitati

To maintain peace in the future it is necessary to be the chief mainstar de
prepared for war. There can scarcely be a possible are described as correde
chance of a conflict, such as the last one, occurring least. The missionary and it
become the envy of nations which led us in all these establishments to destruction
in population, wealth, and military power, we may that the white trader hures pot
particulars only a few years ago, and unless we are pre- missionary party on the albo
ment being some day made to crush us out. Now, Africa, and use it in an arisert
scarcely twenty years after the war, we seem to have for the adrantage af mahiya

There is a large number of people in this coun the insinuations wbich are
try, who by no means deserve the name of Jin- Miss Kingskers boot ir aler

shown by his book, was wonderfully direct and the existence of the African mix

by the fleets of fourth-rate European powers for a time, scriptions than ever. Idelu

Neither of these cost much when it is considered where neither more or les dhe

and tends to prevent war in the future, but is very for the African; and is at

Welshman, and the American artist M1. Boughton, goes, who respond with a te
who is an Englishman. One more criticism." Amen " to this vier dans
Darwin thought the earthworm important enough
to write a book about it. Mr. Skinner says
no place is without earth worms. Now, I want

An Attack oe Is
to say that there are no earthworms where there
are no settlements of men. Forty years ago you

To the Editors of Tullit

I have just laid on 'Isabik might have dug all day in the Saginaw Valley Mary H. Kingsley, a room do and you could not find an earthworm; to-daj a facile per. Indeed, so please sa one spadeful of earth has enough for a day's fish act of her "seeing and internet

attracting attention and easy ing. When I lived at St. Ignace, people used to no inconsiderable task for a more send to Petosky, thirty miles away, and buy angle try the hardships of a te worms because you could not find them in a new More than that, our kaighters settlement; and in southern Michigan you could ciate with the character de manera not find them far away from the farm-house. The bound, if from no other than detected earthworm follows man, never goes before him. to abstain from telling around

against missions," a determind

This may seem like hypercriticism, but it is just if a more serions ber as the best
such small facts taken Botice of that wrote the and thus, incidental, mistet
" Origin of Species " and " The Descent of Man."

administered by the back slas

the streams of missicher dans

W.G. PUDDEFOOT.
Cottage City, Mass.

It is, perhaps, enough to say to be
fessedly not in sympathy

(0.214), and this fact minst
For a Good Navy

clusions; but, all tbe saak,

the result of her book /2005
To the Editors of The Outlook:

I have, if I mistake not, read editorials in The preconceived theories, and a firs
Outlook very seriously deprecating such things might lead to no end di

try where missionary

AB
as the development of our navy and the perfect. will, it still remains true that the
ing of our harbor defenses, on the twofold ground or rather momentarile sale
that they are (1) expensive and (2) unnecessary-

lute reliability of missionate
unnecessary

because it is for the interests of the nial missions cafize the sun
country to be at peace. Personally I have not pentering, bricklaring, sel
agreed with this position on the part of The binding, and printing to be relia
Outlook, and I therefore take the liberty of calling
attention to a passage from the Personal Mem analysis in the statement is
oirs of U. S. Grant," Vol. II., pp. 547, 548. Grant,
I believe, is universally allowed to have been a this was due to the vices are the

For example, she write A

gone into many libraries (our own, for example), and and no doubt there are many men now in jail in needs to be contradicted.

the United States who have been church memR. DE W. MALLARY.

bers. The quality of the liquor sent to West Lenox, Mass.

Africa may be learned from its price. It is so [The following comments on the above quota- cheap that it cannot possibly be pure. I am told tions from the book in question have been kindly here in Bosion that only the vilest stuff is exfurnished us by the Rev. E. E. Strong, D.D., of

ported to Africa. Boston. In publishing them we wish that wher

I think the utterance of this lady, that “ polygever the book has gone they might go also.— THE

amy is not an unmixed evil for the African," will EDITORS.)

aid those who read the book to judge somewhat The book refers to Wes Africa alone, as its

as to the character and temper of the author. If title would imply. The author has seen just the she thinks that the harem of a West African is a worst section of Africa, so far as relates to Chris- good thing for him, we get an inkling as to what tian missions. For some reason, I know not just she considers good. what, missionary work has not prospered in that

I suppose that all our mission boards-our section of the continent as in the east or south or American Presbyterian, the English and Wesleyan central portions. The Church Missionary Society and Church Missionary Societies--would say that has, indeed, an excellent mission along the Niger the West Coast of Africa is, in some respects, River, and no one who has kept track of its work the most difficult and unremunerative fieid in there can honestly deny that it has had a vast which they work. But they are not without en and beneficent influence in the reformation of

couragements. To say that they are accomplishing
numberless towns and villages within its field; nothing is wholly false. Amid many lights and
but along the Gold Coast the liquor traffic has shadows they are working heroically and hope-
wrought ruin. To judge of missions in Africa fully for the elevation of the African.
by the section from Sierra Leone to the mouth of
the Congo would be like describing the Christian
civilization of New York City by what may be

Notes and Queries
seen on the East Side. The work which Moffat
and Livingstone began in South Africa is bearing

NOTE TO CORRESPONDENTS.-It is seldom possible

to answer any inquiry in the next issue after its ruccin. glorious fruit in that region. The French mis

Those who find expected answers late in coming will, sion in Basutoland, our own in Natal, the Scotch we hope, bear in mind the impediments arising from missions on Lake Nyassa, the Universities' mis the constant pressure of many subjects upon our limited sion on the East Coast, and, above all, the work

space. Communications should always bear the writer's

name and address,
of the Church Missionary Society at Uganda,
ought all to be put in the balance against the

Kindly answer the following: 1. How is the phrase

“ second coming of Christ " interpreted by modern the alleged failures on the West Coast, when mis

ology? 2. What is the attitude of the higher Biblical sions in Africa are under discussion. Yet, as to criticism concerning the authorship of the Fourth Gosthis West Coast, the statements quoted from pel, the First Epistle of John, and of the Apocalypse? Miss Kingsley's book are most of them grossly Apocalypse was written in its present form by St. John,

3. Am I not correct in thinking it to be this: That the untrue ; e. g., the charge that “the missionary

one of the twelve Apostles; that the Fourth Gospel parties have greatly exaggerated both the evil and the First Epistle of John in their present form are and the extent of the liquor traffic.” The evi

elaborate treatises of the same unknown writer, who was dence in regard to the demoralization caused by probably one of St. John's disciples, who had, as his out.

line subject matter, papsri which this Apostle had this traffic has not come chiefly from mission written as memoranda ? 4. From a perusal of the recent aries. Joseph Thomson, the well-known Afri editorial entitled " Resident Forces," and of other simican explorer, gave in the “Contemporary Review":

lar ones, I am led to believe that the “ New Theology" for March, 1890, details which were more conclu

denies the supernatural Can one deny the supernatural

and continue to believe in an unseen spiritual world of sive and had a far wider influence than anything spiritual laws and force, distinct from the natural? Or missionaries ever said. The speeches at the

does the New Theology teach, as the editorial referred to Brussels Conference (not by missionaries) and

implies, that the natural world and the spiritual world

are identical, that spiritual laws are the same as natural the action of that Conference are sufficient evi. laws, and that what are sometimes spoken of as natural dence that there has been no exaggeration in this

forces, moral forces, and spiritual forces are simply dif. matter. The London “Times" has depicted

ferent phases of one and the same Great Resident Force?

I am right, does not the New Theology teach idealism! the extent and curse of the gin traffic in the most This seems to be the only alternative, aside from mate. scathing terms. It is ludicrous to affirm that the rialism and pantheism, which the editorial denies to be missionaries have exaggerated these matters in

its teachings.

A. W. A. order to stir up * subscribers at home."

1. So far as "orthodox " opinion, in its modem Some of the statements which Mr. Mallary varieties, deals with this, it is divided between a quotes from the volume may be true, though coming in visible form at a time still future, and a doubtless they are flings, apparently in a bad coming in spirit that has been and still is in prog. spirit. That a chief murderer was formerly a Sun ress, as the Spirit of Christ gains ascendency in day-school teacher in Sierra Leone may be true. the world. 2. It is undetermined, though the Guiteau was once regarded as a good Christian; point that the Apocalypse is not by the same

Damed, Africa is not get in een

Granting that there is a saber

"civilization and referredu b* of the native tribes relor de

Listen to this (699: "Pearl aries have had most to do sur useless;" and this in tel: ****

clear-sighted.

He says in the passage referred to:

West Coast of Africa, and this

among our own people again; but, growing as we are

both the evil and the entert efter for

pared for it we may be in danger of a combined move

the African 88 22 jan de Castel
bad white men, and therefore
lady or gentleman who cal***

Again (p. 661): The game
Africa is not, as has been arte

gotten the lessons it taught, and are going on as if in the
greatest security, without the power to resist an invasion

chased elsewhere

until we could prepare for them.

We should have a good navy, and our seacoast defenses should be put in the finest possible condition,

the money goes, and what we get in return. Money expended in a fine navy not only adds to our security

Again (a 612): "Polyanit of the African to be eliminated

Again ( 109: "One of Bed
man named Jowe, who had been

I could multiple quotation de
Would you kindly reason the dar

material aid to our commerce with foreign nations in
the meantime, Money spent upon seacoast defenses is
spent among our own people, and all goes back again
among the people. The work' accomplished, too, like school teacher in Sierra Lee
that of the navy, gives us a feeling of security,

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author as the Gospel seems to obtain most concurrence. The larger number deny the Johannine authorship of the Gospel and the Epistle. Some of great weight maintain it. This is our own view, while admitting its editorship by another hand. In general, see Professor Bacon's article " Are the Critics Come to Canossa ?" in The Outlook for May 8. 4. The New Theology prefers the term "spiritual" instead of "supernatural.” The natural and the spiritual world are not identical, nor are natural laws the same as spiritual, though there are analogies between them. The forces by which God makes a plant grow and a religion grow differ as the forces differ which we exert in mechanical and in moral work. The generic and ultimate force resident in nature is spiritual. Its modes of energizing differ as its

h ends differ. Thus far is the New Theology from

S denying the supernatural. It denies only the

lu notion that it lies outside of the natural and occasionally interferes with it. The term “idealism” is applicable to various schemes of philosophy, of wbich some do and some do not deny the reality

4. of the material world.

be

le 1. What do you conceive to be the powers of spirits in de the other world? 2. Can they pass from place to place

in at will? 3. What is the "great gulf fixed," Luke xvi., 26? 4. Is there a positive separation of what we call

th good and bad? 5. Where is the line to be drawn, as an goodness is only comparative? 6. What are their pow

ter ers of vision and of discernment? 7. Are powers of communication greater there? 8. Are choices more free there? 9. Is truth plainer there? 10. Is knowledge more

lie positive there? II. Is God more visible and tangible ter there? 12. Are right choices more natural and volun

thc tary there? 13. Does character continue to develop there? 14. What Scripture speaks most clearly on these

tan questions? 15. Is common interpretation of Scripture the voice of God? 16. What consolation can you give T to one who expects to remove hence soon?

asf

W. H. G. frie 1. Inconceivable, except as probably larger

ye

tior than ours. 2. Unknowable. 3. Probably a dif

in o ference in character; how permanent is beyond Tes knowledge. 4. We believe so. 5. Probably a

"ev good many lines, according to degree of good I ness or badness. 6, 7. Unknowable. 8. Prob whe ably not. 9. Some truth doubtless is. 10. Doubt The less also some knowledge. 11. Perhaps so in Gre some forms of manifestation, but not otherwise with than under the veil of the finite, as here. 12. see Probably not, except as here, through progressive tran continuance in well-doing. 13. Doubtless. 14. is no The Scriptures, as the above answers indicate, sim speak with reserve on many points. Such partial eter: conclusions as can be reached depend on com one parison of all that the Scriptures have to say wha with observation of the laws of character and of what we can see of the way of God in the pres nalt ent world. 15. It certainly is not the voice of abod God, though it may open the mind to hear that they voice in the conscience. 16. “All things work word together for good to them that love God."

seem

pe:

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ference in character, bow permanent is beyond Testament revelation/ list

less also some knowledge. 11. Perhaps so in Greek of English. The Greater some forms of manifestation, but not otherwise with the specific sense of all Probably not, except as here, through progressive translated in the Reried Test continuance in well-doing, 13. Doubtless. 14. is not one of them. "Elena The Scriptures, as the above answers indicate, simply as belongiag to det! speak with reserve on many points. Such partial eternal order of things Wiers parison of all that the Scriptures have to say what the thing is or a with observation of the laws of character and of case. In the tert of the Name what we can see of the way of God in the pres. nal tabernades,"1. tents ent world. 15. It certainly is not the voice of abodes in etemity. Nothiyaasa God, though it may open the mind to hear that they are strictly everlasting *

Kindly inform me what is voice in the conscience. 16. "All things work word "tabernacles" or 3 any time apart from God?" In the answer given occurs of Humanity." Was it Genres

962

The Outlook
author as the Gospel seems to obtain most con- this centence: "Betech
currence. The larger number deny the Jobannine this condition of sio moderne
authorship of the Gospel and the Epistle. Some

Moral chars macta
of great weight maintain it. This is our own tle more fully? 2 Dve

physical chars." 1 Case view, while admitting its editorship by another dition Fre on everlastigbazaa hand. In general, see Professor Bacon's article

in ansihilation? 1 The

See
"Are the Critics Come to Canossa ?" in the refer to the life eternal 410

to refer to this life, wie
Outlook for May 8. 4. The New Theology pre- eternal dying in costes com
fers the term “ spiritual "instead of " supernatu believe in eternal deste maison
ral." The natural and the spiritual world are not
identical, nor are natural laws the same as spirit-

1. For many milions de pare
ual, though there are analogies between them. mation of our globe it male
The forces by which God makes a plant gror conflict of elemental langes
and a religion grow differ as the forces differ reduced to order. Biscendenta de
which we exert in mechanical and in moral work. any kind whatever, plesitse
The generic and ultimate force resident in nature endless. That God asyrte,
is spiritual. Its modes of energizing differ as its house forever, such as less
ends differ. Thus far is the New Theology from Strictly speaking, there is no
denying the supernatural. It denies only the late annihilation of anyti e
notion that it lies outside of the natural and oc only of the form in vidite
casionally interferes with it. The term idealism” we quoted from Jesus, “Al het
is applicable to various schemes of philosophy, of xx,38), cores the future

About People

which some do and some do not deny the reality 4. "Orthodox beliet,"actar
of the material world.

but as actually held by a
1. What do you conceive to be the powers of spirits in dergoing such a change the

leading minds in various des
the other world ? 2. Can they pass from place to place in any form that would mit
26? 4. Is there a positive separation of what we call that the ultimate futant d pike
good and bad? 5. Where is the line to be drawn, as and more or less unlopil
goodness is only comparative ? 6. What are their pow. tendency in the church at her
ers of vision and of discernment? 3. Are powers of
communication greater there? 8. Are choices more free pense of judgment on sad po
there? 9. Is truth plainer there? “10. Is knowledge more lie beyond the reach of pastab
positive there? 11. Is God more visible and tangible tendency has been developed by
there? 12. Are right choices more natural and volun-
tary there? 13. Does character continue to develop
there? 14. What Scripture speaks most clearly on these tament.
questions? 15. Is common interpretation of Scripture
the voice of God? 16. What consolation can you give
to one who expects to remove hence soon?

W.H.G.

About People

963 books would it be necessary to study in order to learn for the second term of his Presidency. A numher religious belief?

R. F.G.

ber of the leaders of the party had been called The phrase has no uniform meaning. As used

together secretly to discuss the advisability of roby Positivists, it denotes that substitute for Chris- electing Lincoln. They were much disturbed lianity, or for mere theism, which they find in a

over the question, and after others had spoken sort of deification of collective humanity, and called upon me, as I happened to be present, to devotion to its service. It is also used by some make a speech. I said : • Fellow.countrymenChristian writers to connote the special character I believe in God Almighty; and, so believing, I istic of Christianity, as a faith in the essential have faith in Abraham Lincoln.' " identity of the divine and the human nature, which aspires to realize its ideal of humanity in

-The centenary of the consecration of Bishop realizing the voluntary union of man with God, Bass, of Massachusetts, which was celebrated in order to the fullness of which it sacredly cher

last week, recalls to the New York " Tribune" ishes every human interest as of some divine

some anecdotes of the Bishop. He refused to

live in Dorchester because the brooks there were worth. In the Positivist sense it seems to have been George Eliot's religion in her later years.

“not large enough for Bass to swim in." His You will find a good account of her in this re

first marriage displeased his parishioners, wherespect, as in others, in Mr. Hutton's " Essays on

upon he preached to them a sermon from the Some of the Modern Guides to English Thought

text, " They will slay me for my wife's sake." in Matters of Faith."

His parishioners would often get in arrears with

his salary, which never was more than $500. The poem for which “ W. R.” inquires, beginning When the treasury was so low as to become “I know not what lies before me,

hopeless, they would call upon him and ask what God hangs a mist o'er my eyes,"

they should do. “Well, well," he would say, was written by Mary G. Brainard. It is entitled “God " let it go ; I'll release you, and we will begin Knoweth," and may be found in the collection “ Songs of Three Centuries," edited by J. G. Whittier.

again." C. I, P.

-That the missionary work of the Rev. Gil. bert Reid among the higher classes in China (referred to in the Rev. A. H. Smith's interesting

letter from China printed in The Outlook of -Canon Knox-Little, of Liverpool, England, August ?! is meeting with success is shown by a recently told a good story at a church gathering letter which he has recently received from Li He said that he remembered a lych-gate in front IIung Chang, in which that statesman says: of a beautiful church, which had been restored Unquestionably, if you can give to the blind leaders and made very nice. There was painted over the

of our people light and learning enjoyed in the West,

they, in turn, will lead our people out of their darkness. door, " This is the gate of heaven," and under

I think I may claim to have many friends in the United neath was the large notice, “Go round the other States where you now go. The cordial reception I met

with wherever I went there made a deep impression

upon my heart, and has greatly endeared your people to -Dr. James Hammond Trumbull died at me. If it would interest them to know that I regard Hartford, Conn., on Thursday of last week, in

you highly and give you helping hand in your future his seventy-sixth year. He was one of the best

efforts to bring more light into the world and encourage

higher aims for human aspirations, you may use for known scholars in the country, and a member of that purpose this letter from your friend the National Academy of Sciences, the American (Signed and sealed)

LI HUNG CHANG, Philological Society, and many other societies for Senior Guardian of the Heir Apparent, Classical

Reader to His Majesty the Emperor, Senior Grand the advancement of knowledge. He was Presi. Secretary of State, Minister of the Foreign Office, and dent for twenty-six years of the Connecticut His Earl of the First Rank. torical Society; was Secretary of State from 1861 to 1865; was the literary executor of George Brinley, and catalogued the famous Brinley Library.

Good Deeds - It has long been supposed that the most start The Washington Post " says that Mr. George ling genealogical claim is that of the Negus of W. Vanderbilt proposes to build near his North Abyssinia, who insists that his descent has been Carolina estate a hospital for the treatment of in a straight line from the union of Solomon with consumptives and persons suffering with contathe Queen of Sheba; but some one has discov.

gious diseases, and that his initial gift to the inered a noble family in France, the Counts of Noé, stitution will be $100,000. who not only claim Noah as their remote ancestor, but show on their family blazon that veteran sea Nearly a million dollars was left to his em man in the ark.

ployees by the late Henry L. Pierce, of Boston. -" The most eloquent speech of my life," said Among his public bequests are the following: the late Senator Doolittle, of Wisconsin, a few

$50,000 each to Harvard University, the Massachumonths ago, " was the briefest one I ever made.

setts General Hospital, the Massachusetts Institute of

Technology, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and the It was upon the eve of the nomination of Lincoln Massachusetts Homeopathic Hospital; $25,000 to the

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way."

than ours. 2. Unknowable. 3. Probably a dif- in original Greek text as is com

It is. But the Kentsel Ten

knowledge. 4. We believe so. 5. Probably a

"everlasting."
good many lines, according to degree of good.
ness or badness. 6, 7. Unknowable. 8. Prob- where, substitutes eternal
ably not. 9. Some truth doubtless is. 10. Doubt. The two words are not strict is

than under the veil of the finite, as here. 12. See Hebrews , 16), but

one that endures throughout en

conclusions as can be reached depend on com

seem to look the others

together for good to them that love God."

July 10 the question was asked, "Can a soul live at

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town of Stoughton, his birthplace, for a free library, and $20,000 each to the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston Children's Hospital, Perkins Institute for the Blind, New England Hospital for Women and Children, Boston Home for Aged Men, Boston Home for Aged Women, Boston Home for Aged 1 Couples, Boston Home for Incurables, Society for the Collegiate Instruction of Women, Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, and Boston Lying-in Hospital. On Commencement Day President Eliot said

h at the dinner of the Harvard alumni that the

ti gifts to the University during the past year amount

ti to about a quarter of a million dollars. Among

in these gifts was a bequest of $45,000 from two

d. women who recently died in Portsmouth, N. H. They came of an old family, whose sons always went to Harvard. It was provided that the income should be used in the astronomical observatory. “ They knew nothing of astronomy,” said the President. Why did they give it? Because, us as is said in the will, of a brother who was inter ag ested in the study of the heavenly bodies I looked to see who he was. He died fifty bit years ago, just one year out of Harvard. There

spe is a sentiment of human love held in women's

eat hearts for fifty years."

be One afternoon last week Mrs. A. H. Hum

A

fat: phreys, of Princeton, N. J., and her son, Willard Humphreys, Professor of German in Princeton University, went rowing on Lake George. Near disg

can Long Island Mrs. Humphreys rose hastily in the boat just as the swell from the steamer Ticon M deroga struck it. The craft was overturned, and joke both mother and son were thrown into the water. trati A dispatch says that Professor Humphreys One managed to get hold of his mother and supported Spai her for a long time, occasionally calling for help. just His cries were heard by Samuel Hoadley, a man sixty

beni years old, who has charge of the island. He ran for half a mile to the place where they were. Not stopping to

Argi undress, he kicked off his shoes and sprang into the water. Swimming out to the boat, which lay right side

TI up, but filled with water, six or seven rods from shore, with the son clinging to the side and holding fast to his

It w mother, Mr. Hoadley reached over the boat and took hold of the woman. His weight sank the craft, and left

temp all three unsupported in the water. After a hard strug have gle Mr. Hoadley got the boat bottom side up, and the his si son's arm across the stern, with his hand fast to the

toast collar of his mother's dress. Mr. Hoadley then swam ahead with the painter and towed them to shore. Mrs.

waite Humphreys was dead when they reached the shore, but I'll h her son was saved.

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Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan ought to be proud of At his two prize collies, who have just saved a enga; human life and brought to shore a boat which was fast drifting down the Hudson River. Mr. cross Robert Armstrong, the superintendent of his

for n kennels, with his wife, their baby, a woman vis cried itor, and the two dogs, filled a boat pretty well for culpri a day's excursion. A dog sat in each end. Something on shore attracted the attention of other the collie whose place was in the bow, and he judge made a bound toward his companion and upset penal the boat. Mr. Armstrong seized his child and hold

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