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culminating in the English one of 1611, was formed. The materials Half of the added members belonging to the Church of Eng. which he had, even when supplemented by the additional MSS. land. In America, in the same year, a Revision Company was used by Siephens and others, were but few in number, and secondary formed to co-operate with the English committee, and the members in importance Not one of the four chief MSS. or Codices was were selected from the larger religious bodies of that country, the then available, nor the host of other MSS. which have since been New Testament Company consisting of fifteen members. The discovered. And if the materials were but scanty, the labour · Principles and Rules laid down for the guidance of the Revisionists bestowed on the work was insufficient; and as Erasmus says of by the Committee of Convocation, together with the mode of cohis version, “It was rather tumbled headlong into the world than operation with the American Companies, with other information as edited." But the appetite of Europe, stimulated by the invention to the Revised Version, will be found in the Revisers' Preface to of printing, was keen for the Word of God, and could brook no that version. The original and invited members of the New Testadelay.

ment Company were the following :- The Bishop of Gloucester and As to the fitness of the present time for revision, certainly no age Bristol (Dr. Ellicott), Chairman. The Archbishop of Dublin (Dr. before this has had such ample sources whence to form a text, and i Trench); Bishops of Durham (Dr. J. B. Lightfoot); Salisbury (Dr. none other has had the like wealth of Biblical criticism, which indeed Moberley); St. Andrew's (Dr. Wordsworth). The Very Revs. Dr. could have no existence until the number of MSS. and the variety E. Bickersteth, Dean of Lichfield, and Prolocutor of the Lower of readings furnished material for its exercise, and until the press House of Convocation; Dr. Arthur P. Stanley, Dean of Westrendered the labours of each critic available for all engaged in the minster; Dr. J. W. Blakésley, Dean of Lincoln ; Dr. C. J. Vaughan, same work. Not a few of the most important MSS. have been pub. Dean of Llandaff and Master of the Temple ; Dr. R. Scott, Dean of lished in their entirety, whilst a large number have been collated by Rochester. The Rev. Canons B. H. Kennedy, Regius Professor of Tregelles, Scrivener, Griesbach, Mill, and others.

Greek, Cambridge; B. F. Westcott, Regius Professor of Divinity, An important evidence of the need which is felt for a revised ver- Cambridge. Prebendary Humphry, St. Paul's, London. The Ven. sion, and which, perhaps, has been hardly sufficiently noticed, is Archdeacons W. Lee, D.D. (Dublin) and Lecturer in Divinity ; E. the number of revised Greek texts, and of commentaries on the Palmer (Oxford), Professor of Latin, Oxford. The Rev. Doctors F. whole Bible and certain books of it, which have been published and H. Scrivener, Regius Professor of Greek at Cambridge; F. J. A. much read of late years. Many of these latter have, as their special Hort, Fellow of Emmanuel Coll., Cambridge; J. Angus, President features, improved text or readings, or new translations. It will of the Baptist College, Regent's Park, London; D. Brown, Probe sufficient to mention the works of Bengel, Steir, Delitzsch, fessor of Divinity and Principal, Free Church College, Aberdeen ; Lachmann, Tischendorf, Alford, Wordsworth, Ellicott, Lightfoot, the W. Milligan, Professor of Divinity, Aberdeen; W. F. Moulton, Speaker's Commentary, that of “ Five Clergymen,” McLellan, Professor of Classics, Wesleyan College, Richmond; S. Newth, Scrivener, Palmer, the just published text of Westcott and Hort, Principal of New College, London; A. Roberts, Professor of the result of twenty years' labour.

Humanity, St. Andrews; G. Vance Smith, Joint Author of a revised The history of the Revision of 1881, is briefly as follows :-Con- translation of the Scriptures. vocation passed a resolution in favour of a revision of the Authorised The following were also members of the Revision Committee :Version of the Holy Scriptures, on May 6th, 1870, and a committee of The Bishop of Winchester (Dr. Wilberforce) who died 1873; The its own members was nominated, with liberty to invite the co-opera- Dean of Canterbury (Dr. Alford) who died 1871; Dr. Tregelles, tion of eminent scholars of any nation or religious body. The who never was able to take part in the revision, and died 1875; Dr. committee consisted of sixteen members, eight of them being Eadie, who died 1876. The Dean of Ely (Dr. C. Merivale) resigned Bishops. At the first meeting of the united committee, twenty-one 1871, and Dr. J. H. Newman (afterwards Cardinal), Rector of the scholars were elected as members of the New Testament Company. Roman Catholic University, Dublin, declined to act.

GREEK AND OTHER MSS. OF

THE NEW

TESTAMENT.

GREEK MANUSCRIPTS are known as Uncials (written in The following particulars are extracted from the just published capital letters,) and Cursives (written more in common or running vol. 2 (Introduction and Appendix) of Westcott and Hort's “New hand). The four first named are the most important MSS. and Testament in the original Greek.”are known as follows, originally each contained the whole Bible :- “The remaining Uncial MSS. (after the four first named above)

CODEX VATICANUS or Codex B., in the Vatican Library, at are all of smaller though variable size. None of them show signs Rome, is written on parchment, in capital letters, three columns of having formed part of a complete Bible, or even of a complete on a page. Of the New Testament, it contains the whole, except New Testament. The Gospels are contained, in fair completeness, in the later chapters of Hebrews, the Pastoral Epistles, Philemon, 19 Uncials, the Acts in 9, Catholic Epistles in 7, Pauline Epistles in and the Apocalypse. The date assigned to it is the middle of the 9, and the Apocalypse in 5. The MSS. of the oth and 10th centuries fourth century:

are about as numerous as those of all the preceding centuries CODEX SÎNAITICUS (Aleph) contains all the Books entire. together. With the exception of the Sinaitic, all the more impor. This manuscript was discovered by the late Professor Tischendorf, tant Uncials, some fragments excepted, have been published in in 1844, when travelling, at the Convent of St. Catherine, on Mount continuous texts. The cursive MSS. range from the oth to the 16th Sinai, where he saw some vellum leaves laid aside for lighting the centuries. About 30 contain the whole New Testament. If each stove, and these 14 leaves he published. By the favour of the MS. is counted as one, irrespective of the books contained, the Emperor of Russia, 'he, in 1859, had obtained possession of the total number is between yoo and 1000. Hardly any of these have remainder of the manuscript, and it was published in 1862, as a been printed in extenso, but there are complete and trustworthy memorial of the thousandth year of the Russian Empire. Supposed collations of a select few from Tregelles, and of a large miscellancous date, as (B). It is at St. Peiersburgh.

(English) array from Dr. Scrivener, besides collations of other misCODEX ALEXANDRINUS, (A) so called from having been sent cellaneous assemblages. About 150 Cursives may be set down as from Alexandria, in 1628, as a present to King Charles I., by practically known. A larger number are imperfectly known, and Cyrillus Lucaris, Patriarch of Constantinople. It is in four many are unknown. volumes, and is in the British Museum. The Old Testament is The second class of documents consist of Versions, that is, ancient nearly complete. In the New Testament the parts wanting are translations of the whole or parts of the New Testament, made Matthew to xxv. 6; John from vi. 50 to viii. 52; and 2 Cor. from chiefly for the service of churches in which Greek was, at least, not iv. 13 to xii. 6. Supposed date, the fifth century.

habitually spoken. Besides some outlying Versions, there are three CODEX EPHRAEMI (C) contains about three-fifths of the principal classes, the Latin, the Syriac, and the Egyptian, to which whole (145 out of 238 leaves) one or more sheets having perished may be added two solitary Versions of considerable interest, the out of almost every quire of four sheets.

Fifth century

Armenian and the Gothic. The other Versions are of comparatively CODEX BEZÉ (D), or Cantabrigiensis, or Britannicus.

This

late date, and of little direct value for the Greek text. manuscript was presented by Beza to the University of Cambridge The third class of documentary evidence is supplied by the in 1581, he stating that he discovered it about 19 years before, in the writings of the Fathers, which enables us, with more or less cer. Monastery of St. Irenæus, at Lyons. See above, Beza, 1565. It tainty, to discover the readings of the MS. or MSS. of the New contains, but not complete, in Latin and in Greek, the Gospels and Testament which they employed. the Acts. Its supposed date is the sixth century.

For Lists of the Greek MSS. of the New Testament, with detailed CODEX CLAROMONTANUS, (Dr.) or Regius, 2245, is a Greek description, history, facsimiles, etc., see Scrivener's Plain Introducand Latin manuscript of St. Paul's Epistles, found in the Monastery tion to the Criticism of the New Testament for the use of Biblical of Clermont, Beauvais. It is one of the most ancient and important Students. in existence, and is of the sixth century. It is Uncial in character, and complete, and is in the Paris Library. See above Beza, 1565.

xi

PLAN OF

OF THE WORK.

E
VERY passage of the Revised Version is represented under its principal words, and the texts are

all given in the very words of the Revised Version, with the stops and capitals.
The Concordance consists of two parts :-

I. The General Portion.

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II. Proper Names, i.e., of Persons, Places, and Objects personified ; for the most part, all words beginning with capital letters in the Revised Version. Such of these as are not ordinarily treated as proper names, are quoted in the general portion of the work with a note of reference, e.g., Christians.see proper names."

Order of Words. The words are arranged in strict alphabetical order, and not in families or groups—as, cry, cried, cries, crying. The latter arrangement was convenient when notes and explanations referring to the whole group were given ; but the present order has been adopted as being natural and better suited for easy reference.

Changed Words.—The instances in which words used in the Authorised Version are replaced by others in the Revised Version, are very numerous. This occurs either when a totally different word is used, as perceived for discovered, or when one part of a verb is substituted for another, as stand for stood.

A student looking for a passage under a word familiar to him in the Authorised Version, will very frequently find that the text does not now occur under that word—but that he may nevertheless be able to find the passage, the following plan has been adopted :

At the foot of the texts given under any word, the Reader is referred to such other words as in the Revised Version are used for the old one-e.g., if the passage sought for is "he which hath begun a good work in you will perform it," a reader looking for it under perform will not find it, but he is there referred to complete, perfect ; and on turning to the texts under perfect will find the passage.

At the head of the texts given under any word will be found words of the Authorised Version which have been changed for the word in question ; e.g., if the word referred to is Perceived—there will be found at the head five words occurring in the Authorised Version, but which in the texts quoted are all changed in the Revised Version to the word Perceived, Such words, and the texts in which the change has been made, are correspondingly numbered.

Omitted Verses and Words.-By the courtesy of the Rev. CANON Kennedy, D.D., there is inserted, from his “Ely Lectures on the Revised Version of the New Testament” (London : Bentley), a select List of Authorised passages and words which were omitted in the Revision by preponderant authorities.

Disused Words and Altered Spelling.–Words used in the Authorised Version, but now altogether displaced by others, are shewn in the body of the work thus—Perceivest A.V.-see considerest. Where the spelling of words has been altered, the old spelling is given, and the reader is referred to the new, c.g., Spunge A.V.-see sponge.

Bracketed Words.—To assist in fixing a passage, names of persons or places are inserted in brackets, e.g., Acts 18. 25. "[Apollos) taught carefully the things concerning Jesus.” Acts 19. 28. this, they [Ephesians) were filled with wrath."

“ heard THE

STUDENT’S CONCORDANCE

ERRATA.

66

Page 56. In or into City," Mat. 9. 1, for “Nazareth " read “ Capernaum.”

84. Descending,Mat. 3. 16, omit “John Baptist."
104. Entered," Acts 28. 8, for “ Publius " read “father of Publius."
112. Fain,Philem. 13, read “ (Onesimus] whom I would fain have kept with me."
116. “ His Father,Acts 7. 4, read “when his father was dead, God removed [Abraham]."
143. Go," for Jno. 7. 6, read Jno. 7. 8.
174. "Inquired," for Lu. 18. 26, read Lu. 18. 36.
244. Perceived,Acts 19. 34, for “Paul” read “ Alexander."
273. Rent," Mk. 1. 10, for “John” read “ Jesus."

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went in to 'abide with them

Jno. 3. 36. but the wrath of God abideth on him Jno. 4. 40. they besought him to 4a. with them [disciples 6. 27. for the meat which 'abideth unto eternal life

8. 31. If ye labide in my word, then are ye truly my 56. drinketh my blood labideth in me 12. 46. believeth on me may not abide in the darkness 8. 35. the bond servant a. not-the son abideth for ever 15. 4. Abide in me-except it abide-except ye abide 12. 24. a grain of wheat-it abideth by itself alone 6 If a man abide not in me

34. out of the law that the Christ abideth for ever 7. If ye abide in me, and my words abide in you

14. 17. he labideth with you, and shall be in you 9. labide ye in my love

15. 5. He that abideth in me, and I in him 10. ye shall abide in my love ;-abide in his love 1 Cor. 13. 13. now abideth faith, hope, love 16. that your fruit should Sabide

2 Cor. 9.9. His righteousness sabideth for ever

PLAN OF

OF THE

THE WORK.

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E
VERY passage of the Revised Version is represented under its principal words, and the texts are

all given in the very words of the Revised Version, with the stops and capitals. The Concordance consists of two parts :

I. The General Portion.

II. Proper Names, i.e., of Persons, Places, and Objects personified ; for the most part, all words beginning with capital letters in the Revised Version. Such of these as are not ordinarily treated as proper names, are quoted in the general portion of the work with a note of reference, e.g., "Christians.-see proper names."

Order of Words.—The words are arranged in strict alphabetical order, and not in families or groups—as, cry, cried, cries, crying. The latter arrangement was convenient when notes and explanations referring to the whole group were given ; but the present order has been adopted as being natural and better suited for easy reference.

Changed Words.—The instances in which words used in the Authorised Version are replaced by others in the Revised Version, are very numerous. This occurs either when a totally different word is used, as perceived for discovered, or when one part of a verb is substituted for another, as stand for stood.

A student looking for a passage under a word familiar to him in the Authorised Version, will very frequently find that the text does not now occur under that word—but that he may nevertheless be able to find the passage, the following plan has been adopted :

At the foot of the texts given under any word, the Reader is referred to such other words as in the Revised Version are used for the old one-t.g, if the passage sought for is "he which hath begun a good work in you will perform it,” a reader looking for it under perform will not find it, but he is there referred to complete, perfect ; and on turning to the texts under perfect will find the passage.

At the head of the texts given under any word will be found words of the Authorised Version which have been changed for the word in question ; 6.g., if the word referred to is Perceived—there will be found at the head five words occurring in the Authorised Version, but which in the texts quoted are all changed in the Revised Version to the word Perceived. Such words, and the texts in which the change has been made, are correspondingly numbered.

Omitted Verses and Words.-By the courtesy of the Rev. CANON KENNEDY, D.D., there is inserted, from his “Ely Lectures on the Revised Version of the New Testament" (London : Bentley), a select List of Authorised passages and words which were omitted in the Revision by preponderant authorities.

Disused Words and Altered Spelling.–Words used in the Authorised Version, but now altogether displaced by others, are shewn in the body of the work thus—Perceivest A.V.-see considerest. Where the spelling of words has been altered, the old spelling is given, and the reader is referred to the new, c.g., Spunge A.V.-see sponge.

Bracketed Words.- To assist in fixing a passage, names of persons or places are inserted in brackets, e.g., Acts 18. 25. “[Apollos) taught carefully the things concerning Jesus.” Acts 19. 28. “heard this, they [Ephesians) were filled with wrath."

!

THE

STUDENT'S CONCORDANCE

ERRA TA.

Page 56.

84. 104. 112. 116. 143. 174. 244. 273.

In or into City," Mat. 9. 1, for “Nazareth” read Capernaum."

Descending,Mat. 3. 16, omit “John Baptist.”
Entered,Acts 28. 8, for “Publius” read "father of Publius.”
Fain,Philem. 13, read “ [Onesimus] whom I would fain have kept with me.”
His Father,Acts 7. 4, read “when his father was dead, God removed [Abraham]."
Go," for Jno. 7. 6, read Jno. 7. 8.
Inquired," for Lu. 18. 26, read Lu. 18. 36.

Perceived," Acts 19. 34, for “Paul" read “ Alexander."
Rent,Mk. 1. 10, for “John” read “Jesus.”

went in to fabide with them

Jno. 3. 36. but the wrath of God abideth on him Jno. 4. 40. they besought him to 4a. with them (disciples 6. 27. for the meat which abideth unto eternal life

8. 31. If ye labide in my word, then are ye truly my 56. drinketh my blood labideth in me 12. 46. believeth on me may not abide in the darkness 8. 35. the bond servant a. not-the son abideth for ever 15. 4. Abide in me-except it abide-except ye abide 12. 24. a grain of wheat-it abideth by itself alone 6. If a man abide not in me

34. out of the law that the Christ abideth for ever 7. If ye abide in me, and my words abide in you

14. 17. he labideth with you, and shall be in you 9. labide ye in my love

15. 5. He that abideth in me, and I in him 10. ye shall abide in my love ;--abide in his love 1 Cor. 13. 13. now abideth faith, hope, love 16. that your fruit should Sabide

2 Cor. 9. 9. His righteousness sabideth for ever

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