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PAOL

Death of the Christian
177 Nature's Nobility

189
Elegy written in a Country Ode. - Intimations of Immor-
Church-yard...........

183

tality from Recollections of
Excelsior
180 Early Childhood ...

177
On God

151

Fame

168 Opportunities of the Day .........

191

Hand to Take
199 Peace in God.

158
Hours, The Worth of............... 179 Prayer, the Time for

164

Household Bible.

160 Psalm xviii. ........

149

Human Woes, The Grand Cure

civ..

147

181

cxxxix.

149

Hymn of the City

Resignation

196

Immortality

154 Ring out, Wild Bells

207

Intimations of ...... 168

Iona.Dr. Johnson's Reflections Science and Religion

175

on Visiting it

186 Show you have a Heart............ 186

Isaiah, Chap. xl.

145 Song of the Water-drinker
Chap. xli.
149 Speak Gently

197

Chap. lii.

150

Stanzas

188

Chap. lv.
150 Steam, The Song of..

208
Chap. Ixiii.

151
Thanatopsis

157
Job, Chap. xxxviii.................. 147 The Day is done

..................... 205
The Dead Pan

204
Labour
202 The Departed Daughter

185
Life, the Rule of.
164 The Good Great Man....

165
a Psalm of
167 The Library

194

Light, Address to

189 The Life of God in the Soul of

for All

202 Man....

154

Locksley Hall
192 The Nativity......

155
The Press

195
Man, Happiness of
166 The Soul's Defiance

187

Men of the North

205 The True Poet.....

193

Milton on his Blindness

196 The Two Sons

206

Moral Beauty
198 The Village Parson...

169
Music ....
193 To a Friend

195

Trust in God and do the Right, 159
National Anthem... ......

200
Nature and the Bible, Analogy of, 145 Universal Prayer .....................

161

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A Bright Sunny Noon

229 Autumn, Address to

240

A Calm Winter Night

231

Flower Garden

240

A Cataract.......

254

A Wild Night at Sea .............. 260

Adam's Morning Hymn............ 226
A Moonlight Night
232 Beauty, The Spirit of...

..... 227

A Prairie on Fire

261

A Thunder Storm in the Scottish Cataract of Lodore

257
Highlands
260 Coral Insect, The

254

CHOICE READING , IN POETRY AND PROSE.

SECTION I.

HISTORICAL SELECTIONS.

THE AGES.

Look on this beautiful world, and read the truth
In her fair page; see, every season brings
New change, to her, of everlasting youth;
Still the green soil, with joyous living things,
Swarms; the wide air is full of joyous wings;
And myriads still, are happy in the sleep
Of ocean's azure gulfs, and where he flings

The restless surge. Eternal Love doth keep
In his complacent arms, the earth, the air, the deep.

Will, then, the Merciful One,—who stamped our race
With his own image, and who gave them sway
O’er earth, and the glad dwellers on her face,
Now that our swarming nations far away
Are spread, where'er the moist earth drinks the day,
Forget the ancient care that taught and nursed
His latest offspring ? will he quench the ray

Infused by his own forming smile at first,
And leave a work so fair, all blighted and accursed ?

Oh, no! a thousand cheerful omens give
Hope of yet happier days—whose dawn is nigh.
He who has tamed the elements, shall not live
The slave of his own passions; he whose eye
Unwinds the eternal dances of the sky,
And in the abyss of brightness dare to span
The sun's broad circle, rising yet more high,

In God's magnificent works his will shall scan-
And love and peace shall make their paradise with man.

B

Sit at the feet of History—through the night Of years, the steps of virtue she shall trace, And show the earlier ages, where her sight Can pierce the eternal shadows o'er their face;When, from the genial cradle of our race, Went forth the tribes of men, their pleasant lot To choose, where palm-groves cooled their dwelling-place, Or freshening rivers ran; and there forgot The truth of heaven, and kneeled to gods that heard them not.

Those ages have no memory—but they left
A Record in the desert-columns strown
On the waste sands, and statues fallen and cleft,
Heaped like a host in battle overthrown;
Vast ruins, where the mountain's ribs of stone
Were hewn into a city; streets that spread
In the dark earth, where never breath has blown

Of heaven's sweet air, nor foot of man dares tread
The long and perilous ways—the “ Cities of the Dead.

See tombs of monarchs to the clouds up-piledWho perished, but whose eternal tombs remainAnd the black precipice, abrupt and wild, Pierced by long toil and hollowed to a fane ;Huge piers and frowning forms of gods sustain The everlasting arches, dark and wide, Like the night heaven, when clouds are black with rain. But idly skill was tasked, and strength was plied All was the work of slaves, to swell a despot's pride.

But virtue cannot dwell with slaves nor reign
O'er those who cower to take a tyrant's yoke;
She left the down-trod nations in disdain,
And flew to Greece, when liberty awoke,
New born, amid those glorious vales, and broke
Sceptre and chain with her fair youthful hands :
As rocks are shivered in the thunder stroke.

And lo! in full-grown strength an empire stands
Of leagued and rival states, the wonder of the lands.

Oh, Greece! thy flourishing cities were a spoil
Unto each other; thy hard hand oppressed
And crushed the helpless; thou didst make thy soil
Drunk with the blood of those that loved thee best;
And thou didst drive, from thy unnatural breast,
Thy just and brave to die in distant climes;
Earth shuddered at thy deeds, and sighed for rest

From thine abominations; after times,
That yet shall read thy tale, will tremble at thy crimes.

Yet there was that within thee which has saved
Thy glory, and redeemed thy blotted name;
The story of thy better deeds, engraved
On fame's unmouldering pillar, puts to shame
Our chiller virtue; the high art to tame
The whirlwind of the passions was thine own;
And the pure ray, and from thy bosom came,

Far over many a land and age has shone,
And mingles with the light that beams from God's own throne.

And Rome–thy sterner, younger sister she
Who awed the world with her imperial frown-
Rome drew the spirit of her race from thee, -
The rival of thy shame and thy renown.
Yet her degenerate children sold the crown
Of earth's wide kingdoms to a line of slaves;
Guilt reigned, and woe with guilt, and plagues came down,

Till the north broke its flood-gates, and the waves Whelmed the degraded race, and weltered o'er their graves.

Vainly that ray of brightness from above,
That shone around the Galilean lake, -
The light of hope, the leading star of love,-
Struggled, the darkness of that day to break;
Even its own faithless guardians strove to slake,
In fogs of earth, the pure immortal flame;
And priestly hands for Jesus' blessed saké,

Were red with blood; and charity became,
In that stern war of forms, a mockery and a name.

They triumphed, and less bloody rites were kept
Within the quiet of the convent cell ;
The well-fed inmates pattered prayer, and slept
And sinned and liked their easy penance well,
Where pleasant was the spot for men to dwell,
Amid its fair broad lands the abbey lay,
Sheltering dark orgies that were shame to tell,

And cowled and barefoot beggars swarmed the way,
All in their convent weeds of black, and white, and gray.

Oh, sweetly the returning muses' strain,
Swelled over that famed stream, whose gentle tide
In their bright lap the Etrurian vales detain,
Sweet, as when winter storms have ceased to chide,
And all the new-leaved woods, resounding wide,
Sent out wild hymns upon the scented air.
Lo! to the smiling Arno's classic side

The emulous nations of the west repair,
And kindle their quenched urns, and drink fresh spirit there.

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