How to Do Business: Or, The Secret of Success in Retail Merchandizing

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J. Jackson, 1890 - 207 pages
 

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Page 121 - If you would know the value of money, go and try to borrow some; for he that goes a borrowing goes a sorrowing...
Page 189 - GENIUS unexerted is no more genius than a bushel of acorns is a forest of oaks. There may be epics in men's brains just as there are oaks in acorns ; but the tree and the book most come out before we can measure them.
Page 48 - Who steals my purse, steals trash; . . . But he that filches from me my good name, Robs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed.
Page 141 - Och! it hardens a' within And petrifies the feeling. To catch dame Fortune's golden smile Assiduous, wait upon her, And gather gear by ev'ry wile That's justified by honor. Not for to hide it in a hedge, Not for a train attendant But for the glorious privilege Of being independent.
Page 140 - ... Perseverance is the last of the business habits that we have to notice. It means the steady pursuit of a plan, whether good or bad ; but it would be very unwise to persevere in a plan which conscience or practice had proved to be bad. In actual life, where there are so many different pursuits, and different ways of doing the same thing, it means steadiness in the execution of whatever plan is determined upon. Burgh makes mention of a merchant who, at first setting out, opened and shut his shop...
Page 81 - A wellregulated commerce is not, like law, physic, or divinity, to be overstocked with hands ; but, on the contrary, flourishes by multitudes, and gives employment to all its professors. Fleets of merchantmen are so many squadrons of floating shops, that vend our wares and manufactures in all the markets of the world, and find out chapmen under both the tropics.
Page 131 - Tis education forms the common mind ; Just as the twig is bent the tree's inclined.
Page 141 - ... means steadiness in the execution of whatever plan is determined upon. Burgh makes mention of a merchant, who, at first setting out, opened and shut his shop every day for several weeks together, •without selling goods to the value of one penny, who, by the- force of application for a course of years, rose at last to a handsome fortune.
Page 139 - A False balance is abomination to the LORD : but a just weight is his delight.
Page 135 - Resolve, that no man is wise or safe, but he that is honest. Serve God ; let him be the author of all thy actions: Commend all thy...

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