The Dictionary of Education and Instruction: a Reference Book and Manual on the Theory and Practice of Teaching: For the Use of Parents, Teachers, and Others; Based Upon the Cyclopędia of Education

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E. Steiger & Company, 1881 - 329 pages
 

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Page 124 - In time, some particular train of ideas fixes the attention; all other intellectual gratifications are rejected ; the mind, in weariness or leisure, recurs constantly to the favourite conception, and feasts on the luscious falsehood whenever she is offended with the bitterness of truth.
Page 2 - ... of the military academy at West Point and the naval academy at Annapolis, and giving members of Congress another excuse for neglecting their proper legislative functions to busy themselves with patronage.
Page 158 - As nothing teaches, so nothing delights more than history. The first of these recommends it to the study of grown men; the latter makes me think it the fittest for a young lad, who as soon as he is instructed in chronology and acquainted with the several epochs in use in this part of the world, and can reduce them to the Julian Period, should then have some Latin history put into his hand.
Page 124 - ... gratifications are rejected ; the mind, in weariness or leisure, recurs constantly to the favourite conception, and feasts on the luscious falsehood whenever she is offended with the bitterness of truth. By degrees the reign of fancy is confirmed; she grows first imperious and in time despotic. Then fictions begin to operate as realities, false opinions fasten upon the mind, and life passes in dreams of rapture or of anguish.
Page 243 - I do not hesitate to teach that corporal infliction is one of the justifiable means of establishing authority in the schoolroom. To this conclusion I have come, after a careful consideration of the subject, modified by the varied experience of nearly twenty years, and by a somewhat attentive observation of the workings of all the plans which have been devised to avoid its use or .to supply its place.
Page 57 - ... central controls necessary to ensure full employment will, of course, involve a large extension of the traditional functions of government. Furthermore, the modern classical theory has itself called attention to various conditions in which the free play of economic forces may need to be curbed or guided. But there will still remain a wide field for the exercise of private initiative and responsibility.
Page 115 - ... that exquisite something called Style, which, like the grace of perfect breeding, everywhere pervasive and nowhere emphatic, makes itself felt by the skill with which it effaces itself, and masters us at last with a sense of indefinable completeness.
Page 153 - ... foreign to its own nature. This identity of consciousness, and the special character of anything done or endured by it, we call Habit [habitual conduct or behavior]. It conditions formally all progress; for that which is not yet become habit, but which we perform with design and an exercise of our will, is not yet a part of ourselves.
Page 150 - Give me a man who can, with full intelligence, take to pieces an English sentence, brief and not too complicated even, and I will welcome him as better prepared for further study in other languages than if he had read both Caesar and Virgil, and could parse them in the routine style in which they are often parsed".
Page 121 - The light must be sufficiently strong, and must fall on the table from the left-hand side, and, as far as possible, from above. The children ought to sit straight, and not have the book nearer to the eye than ten inches at the least. Besides this, the book ought to be raised 20° for writing, and about 40° for reading.

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