The Chautauquan, Volumes 49-50

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M. Bailey, 1906

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Page 149 - A b ringer of new things; and vile it were For some three suns to store and hoard myself, And this gray spirit yearning in desire To follow knowledge like a sinking star, Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.
Page 149 - ULYSSES. IT little profits that an idle king, By this still hearth, among these barren crags, Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole Unequal laws unto a savage race, That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.
Page 120 - I HEARD the bells on Christmas Day Their old familiar carols play, And wild and sweet The words repeat Of peace on earth, good-will to men ! And thought how, as the day had come, The belfries of all Christendom Had rolled along The unbroken song Of peaceon earth, good- will to men...
Page 424 - ... have proved that he did not fail to anticipate — the waylayings to which he was subjected. He must have foreseen, I reflected, the secret investigations of his premises. His frequent absences from home at night, which were hailed by the Prefect as certain aids to his success, I regarded only as ruses, to afford opportunity for thorough search to the police, and thus the sooner to impress them with the conviction to which G , in fact, did finally arrive — the conviction that the letter was...
Page 426 - No sooner had I glanced at this letter than I concluded it to be that of which I was in search. To be sure, it was to all appearance radically different from the one of which the Prefect had read us so minute a description. Here the seal was large and black, with the D cipher; there it was small and red, with the ducal arms of the S family.
Page 294 - Nature contains the elements, in colour and form, of all pictures, as the keyboard contains the notes of all music. But the artist is born to pick, and choose, and group with science, these elements, that the result may be beautiful— as the musician gathers his notes, and forms his chords, until he brings forth from chaos glorious harmony. To say to the painter, that Nature is to be taken as she is, is to say to the player, that he may sit on the piano.
Page 173 - And he spake a parable unto them, Can the blind lead the blind? shall they not both fall into the ditch?
Page 150 - Though much is taken, much abides; and though We are not now that strength which in old days Moved earth and heaven — that which we are, we are: One equal temper of heroic hearts, Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
Page 417 - ... readily made drunk. I have keys, as you know, with which I can open any chamber or cabinet in Paris. For three months a night has not passed, during the greater part of which I have not been engaged, personally, in ransacking the D Hotel. My honor is interested, and, to mention a great secret, the reward is enormous.
Page 424 - I considered, could not fail to be aware of the ordinary policial modes of action. He could not have failed to anticipate— and events have proved that he did not fail to anticipate— the waylayings to which he was subjected. He must have foreseen, I reflected, the secret investigations of his premises.

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