A Treatise on the Law of Fire Insurance: Adapted to the Present State of the Law, English and American : with Copious Notes and Illustrations

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Banks & Brothers, 1878 - 922 pages

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Page 476 - Dec. 581, an applicant for insurance had described the property in a written application as " his house," and it was so described in the policy. The policy contained the condition: "If the interest in the property to be insured is not absolute, it must be so represented to the company, and expressed in the policy in writing; otherwise the insurance shall be void.
Page 154 - ... inasmuch as the written words are the immediate language and terms selected by the parties themselves for the expression of their meaning, and the printed words are a general formula adapted equally to their case and that of all other contracting parties upon similar occasions and subjects.
Page 733 - ... if the assured shall have, or shall hereafter make, any other insurance on the property hereby insured, or any part thereof, without the consent of the company written hereon...
Page 153 - ... as by the known usage of trade or the like, acquired a peculiar sense distinct from the popular sense of the same words...
Page 447 - ... building or premises shall be occupied in any way so as to render the risk more hazardous than at the time of insuring, such insurance shall be void and of no effect.
Page 478 - In that case the policy provided that "if the interest in the property to be insured be a leasehold interest, or other interest not absolute, it must be so represented to the company, and expressed in the policy in writing, otherwise the insurance shall be void;" and the facts were that the assured was in possession under a parol agreement to purchase.
Page 297 - And the said applicant hereby covenants and agrees to and with said company, that the foregoing is a just, full and true exposition of all the facts and circumstances in regard to the condition, situation, value and risk of the property to be insured, so far as the same are known to the applicant, and are material to the risk...
Page 210 - ... happen or take place by means of any invasion, insurrection, riot or civil commotion, or any military or usurped power, explosion, earthquake or hurricane.
Page 708 - ... fire, not concerned in the loss as a creditor or otherwise, nor related to the assured, stating that he has examined the circumstances attending the loss; knows the character and circumstances of the assured, and verily believes that the assured has without fraud sustained loss on the property insured to the amount which such magistrate or notary public shall certify.
Page 212 - Conn. 459, the question was presented in an action on a policy of fire insurance which provided "that the insurers would not be liable for loss or damage, happening by means of any invasion, insurrection, riot, or civil commotion, or of any military or usurped power...

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