The Lawrence Reader and Speaker: A Compilation of Masterpieces in Poetry and Prose, Including Many of the Greatest Orations of All Ages, with Biographical Notes of the Authors, Poets, and Orators ...

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A. C. McClurg & Company, 1911 - 351 pages
 

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Page 336 - Better than all measures Of delightful sound; Better than all treasures That in books are found, Thy skill to poet were, thou scorner of the ground! Teach me half the gladness That thy brain must know, Such harmonious madness From my lips would flow, The world should listen then, as I am listening now. THE
Page 311 - June 12, 1878. TO him who in the love of Nature holds Communion with her visible forms, she speaks A various language; for his gayer hours She has a voice of gladness, and a smile And eloquence of beauty j and she glides Into his darker musings with a mild And
Page 315 - main — The venturous bark that flings On the sweet summer wind its purpled wings, In gulfs enchanted, where the siren sings, And coral reefs lie bare, Where the cold sea-maids rise to sun their streaming hair. Its webs of living gauze no more unfurl; Wreck'd is the ship of pearl! And every chamber'd cell,
Page 211 - petitions have been answered only by repeated injuries. A prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. Nor have we been wanting in attentions to our British brethren. We have warned
Page 334 - Teach us sprite or bird What sweet thoughts are thine: I have never heard Praise of love or wine That panted forth a flood of rapture so divine. Chorus hymeneal, Or triumphant chant, Matched with thine would be all But an empty vaunt — A thing wherein we feel there is some hidden want.
Page 332 - setting sun, O'er which clouds are brightening, Thou dost float and run; Like an unbodied joy whose race is just begun. The pale, purple even Melts around thy flight; Like a star of heaven, In the broad daylight, Thou art unseen, but yet I hear thy shrill delight.
Page 307 - Borne, like thy bubbles, onward; from a boy I wanton'd with thy breakers — they to me Were a delight; and if the freshening sea Made them a terror—'twas a pleasing fear, For I was as it were a child of thee, And trusted to thy billows far and near, And laid my hand upon thy mane — as I do here.
Page 302 - day I oft remember, when from sleep I first awaked, and found myself reposed. Under a shade, on flowers, much wondering where And what I was, whence thither brought, and how. Not distant far from thence a murmuring sound Of waters issued from a cave, and spread Into a liquid plain, then stood unmoved,

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