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“Left the White House unattended at 6.30 P.M. and walked through the semi-dark streets of Washington to 1733 N Street, N. W., the residence of his brother-in-law, Commander Cowles. Dined in private with the family

“ Late in the evening received a few close friends. Retired at 11 P.M."

It will be observed that special mention is made of the fact that President Roosevelt travelled around alone. Immediately after the terrible tragedy at Buffalo many citizens were of the opinion that the Chief Magistrate of our nation ought to be strongly protected, for fear of further violence, but to this Theodore Roosevelt would not listen.

“I am not afraid,” he said calmly. “We are living in a peaceful country, and the great mass of our people are orderly, lawabiding citizens. I can trust them, and take care of myself.” And to this he held, despite the protestations of his closest friends. Of course he is scarcely ever without some guard or secret service detective close at hand, but no outward display of such protection is permitted. And let it be added to the credit

of our people that, though a few cranks and crazy persons have caused him a little annoyance, he has never, up to the present time, been molested in any way.

CHAPTER XXVI

CONTINUING THE WORK BEGUN BY PRESIDENT Mc.

KINLEY – THE PANAMA CANAL AGITATION - VISIT OF PRINCE HENRY OF PRUSSIA – THE PRESIDENT AT THE CHARLESTON EXPOSITION

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT had said he would continue the policy inaugurated by President McKinley, and one of the important steps in this direction was to appoint many to office who had been expecting appointment at the hands of the martyred President. This gained him many friends, and soon some who had kept themselves at a distance flocked around, to aid him in every possible

manner.

Late in September the last of the McKinley effects were taken from the White House, and some days later the newly made President moved in, with his family, who had come down from the Adirondacks some time previous. In Washington the family were joined by Mr. Roosevelt's two brothersin-law, Commander Wm. Sheffield Cowles

and Mr. Douglas Robinson, and their wives, and the relatives remained together for some days.

It was at first feared by some politicians that President Roosevelt would be what is termed a “sectional President,” – that is, that he would favor one section of our country to the exclusion of the others, but he soon proved that he was altogether too noble for such baseness.

“I am going to be President of the whole United States," he said. “I don't care for sections or sectional lines. I was born in the North, but my mother was from the South, and I have spent much of my

time in the West, so I think I can fairly represent the whole country.”

President Roosevelt sympathized deeply with the condition of the negroes in the South, and for the purpose of learning the true state of affairs sent for Mr. Booker T. Washington, one of the foremost colored men of this country and founder of the Tuskegee Industrial School for Colored People. They had a long conference at the White House, which Mr. Washington enjoyed very much. For this action many

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