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This was the beginning of negotiations, and in the end, the representatives of Japan and Russia came to this country, to meet at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in a Naval Building fitted up for that purpose by this government.

Here a treaty of peace was signed which gave to the world at large immense satisfaction. For his work as a peacemaker President Roosevelt received the gratitude of all the great rulers of Europe and was more beloved than ever.

“He knows when and how to fight and when and how to make peace," said they. “He is certainly a wonderful man.”

But while he was doing so much for foreign nations, President Roosevelt did not forget his duties at home. Certain abuses had existed in the running of the departments at Washington, and now the Chief Magistrate issued an order calling for sweeping reforms. This caused a great “shaking up” among both officers and clerks, and all of the departments became much better because of the housecleaning. Among others to go was the public printer at the Capitol. President Roosevelt asked him to resign, but as he would not do so, he was dismissed.

There was a great scandal in the public printing office at this time, and it took a while to straighten matters out. Some wanted to hush the matter up, but the Chief Magistrate would not listen, and in the end the changes he had recommended were made, much to the satisfaction of the country at large.

CHAPTER XXXI

DEATH OF SECRETARY OF STATE HAY - THE PRESI

DENT'S TRIP TO THE SOUTH – MARRIAGE OF ALICE
ROOSEVELT — THE GREAT SAN FRANCISCO EARTH-
QUAKE - GOVERNMENT AID - PRESIDENT ROOSE-
VELT AND THE PACKING HOUSES INVESTIGATION
THE NAVAL REVIEW AT OYSTER BAY LEADING
THE WAY IN SPELLING REFORM-OFF FOR PANAMA

On the first day of July, 1905, John Hay, Secretary of State, died. The President and his chief adviser had been warm friends and the shock to the Chief Magistrate was a great one. He issued a proclamation to our Nation, and attended the funeral at Cleveland, Ohio. Later he appointed Elihu Root to take Secretary Hay's place in the Cabinet. Mr. Root had formerly been Secretary of War and filled the position very acceptably, so the appointment was hailed with satisfaction.

Early in the month a great National Educational Convention was held at Asbury Park, New Jersey. About sixty thousand persons were present, and President Roose

velt was requested to deliver an address, which he did. He took up the matter of education from his own strenuous standpoint, and held his audience spellbound. At the conclusion of the speech many pressed forward to shake his hand, and he made a host of new personal friends.

Midsummer found the President and his family again at Oyster Bay. Here he took a much-needed rest, going out occasionally for a horseback ride, or rowing and camping in the woods with his younger sons. The boys must have had some rare good times, and what American boy would not have liked to have been along? In August the Peace Plenipotentiaries of Russia and Japan came to Oyster Bay and were formally introduced to each other by President Roosevelt, and this visit was followed by others from the representatives of the two nations which were at war. The Chief Magistrate gave all of them his advice, and the upshot was the peace treaty before mentioned. The President also, by special request, journeyed to Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, to address the coal-miners regarding a strike, which he much deplored, and also

visited and spoke at the Chautauqua Assembly in New York State.

The first of October, 1905, found President Roosevelt again at the White House and as busy as ever. But the people of the South were clamoring for a visit from him, and soon such a trip was arranged, starting about the middle of October. The first stop was at Richmond, Virginia, where he was given a rousing ovation, and a grand parade was held in his honor. From Richmond he went to Raleigh and other cities in North Carolina, and then to Atlanta, Georgia, delivering addresses which were listened to with the closest of attention. From Georgia the Chief Magistrate journeyed to Jacksonville, Florida, and then through Mississippi to New Orleans, Louisiana. Here the yellow fever had been strong, but the President braved the danger, and spoke words of wisdom and encouragement to the multitude that flocked to hear him. In a political sense he was “in the enemy's country,” for the South had been, as of old, solidly Democratic in the presidential elec

yet the people vied with each other to do him honor. He was their President,

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