The Family Magazine, a Repository of Literary and Entertaining Knowledge

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Dayton & Burdick, 1856
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Page 134 - Support, and ornament of Virtue's cause. There stands the messenger of truth : there stands The legate of the skies ! — His theme divine, His office sacred, his credentials clear. By him the violated law speaks out Its thunders ; and by him, in strains as sweet As angels use, the Gospel whispers peace.
Page 27 - For the Lord is a great God, And a great King above all gods. In his hand are the deep places of the earth : The strength of the hills is his also. The sea is his, and he made it : And his hands formed the dry land.
Page 205 - And I heard a voice from heaven, as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of a great thunder ; and I heard the voice of harpers harping with their harps, and they sung as it were a new song before the throne and before the four beasts and the elders; and no man could learn that song but the hundred and forty and four thousand, which were redeemed from the earth.
Page 208 - See the wretch, that long has tost On the thorny bed of pain, At length repair his vigour lost, And breathe and walk again : The meanest floweret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, To him are opening paradise.
Page 173 - twas given A golden harp to buy, Such as the white-robed choir attune To deathless minstrelsy. Lost! lost! lost! I feel all search is vain ; That gem of countless cost Can ne'er be mine again ; I offer no reward, For till these heart-strings sever, I know that Heaven-intrusted gift Is reft away for ever.
Page 153 - Let darkness and the shadow of death stain it; let a cloud dwell upon it; let the blackness of the day terrify it. As for that night, let darkness seize upon it; let it not be joined unto the days of the year, let it not come into the number of the months. Lo, let that night be solitary, let no joyful voice come therein.
Page 45 - Its darken'd shadows fling, And hopes that cheer thee now, Die in their early spring ; Should pleasure at its birth Fade like the hues of even, Turn thou away from earth, — There 's rest for thee in heaven...
Page 134 - He stablishes the strong, restores the weak, Reclaims the wanderer, binds the broken heart, And, arm'd himself in panoply complete Of heavenly temper, furnishes with arms Bright as his own, and trains, by every rule Of holy discipline, to glorious war The sacramental host of God's elect...
Page 207 - Long labour, why, forgetful of his toils And due repose, he loiters to behold The sunshine gleaming as through amber clouds, O'er all the western sky : full soon, I ween, His rude expression and untutor'd airs, Beyond the power of language, "will unfold The form of beauty smiling at his heart, How lovely!
Page 55 - Woe to the youth whom Fancy gains, Winning from Reason's hand the reins, Pity and woe! for such a mind Is soft, contemplative, and kind; And woe to those who train such youth, And spare to press the rights of truth, The mind to strengthen and anneal While on the stithy glows the steel!

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