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CHAPTER VII.

INDIAN RESERVATIONS OF ARIZONA TERRITORY.

The Gadsden purchase first bore the name of Arizona,' which was transferred to the Territory when it was organized by the act of February 24, 1863,2 to include the above purchase and a portion of New Mexico Territory.

The tribes of Indians residing in Arizona at the time of its organization were about the same as at the present day. They are gathered upon nine reservations, having a total area of 6,603,191 acres.) Number of Indians under agency control...

18,699 Number of Indians not under agency

2,464

Total Indian population..

21, 163 Agencies: Colorado River Agency, having in charge Colorado River, Hualpai, Suppai Reservations, and Yuma Reservation, of California ; Pima Agency, having the Gila Bend, Gila River, Papago, Salt River Reservations; and San Carlos Agency, having White Mountain Reservation in charge.

The Moqui Reservation is under the care of the Navajo Agency, New Mexico.

COLORADO RIVER AGENCY.

[Post-office address, Parker, Yuna County, Ariz.]

COLORADO RIVER RESERVATION

How established.-By act of Congress, March 3, 1865; executive orders, November 22, 1873, November 16, 1874, and May 15, 1876.

Area and survey.-Contains 300,800 acres, of which 80,000 are classed as tillable. Out-boundaries surveyed.

Acres cultivated. - The Indians have under cultivation 1,040 acres.

Tribes and population.--The tribes living here are the Kemahivivi (Tantawait), Koahualla, Kokopa, Mohavi, and Yuma. Total population, 1,025.5

Location. The reservation, beginning at a point 5 miles north of Ehrenberg, Ariz., extends 70 miles up the Colorado River, which here forms the boundary line between the State of California and the Terri.

Report of Indian Commissioner, 1857, p. 296. 2 United States Statutes at Large, Vol. XII, p. 664. 3 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1884, p. 256. * Ibid, p. 304. 6 Ibid., p. 284.

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tory of Arizona, and embraces within its limits all, or nearly all, of the bottom land on either side of said river. The agency is situated near the northern line of the reservation, at a distance of 50 miles from Ehrenberg, 100 miles from Fort Mohave, 180 miles from Fort Yuma, and about the same distance from Prescott, the capital of the Territory. The soil is a light sandy loam, interspersed with large tracts of adobe land," strongly impregnated with alkali; also with occasional sloughs or marshes, which are productive only when an overflow of the Colorado River occurs. As these sloughs constitute the entire arable land of the reserve, and as they are small in area, limited in number, and widely separated by interposing tracts of non-productive soil, the results of farming are necessarily meagre and unsatisfactory.

Government rations.-Seventeen per cent. of Government rations is. sued to these Indians in 1884.2

Mill and employés.—No mills and farmers.
Indian police.- Established in 1881.5
Indian court of offences.-Established in 1883."

145

School population, attendance, and support.
School population as reported in 18865.
Agency boarding and day school accommodaiion..
Average boarding and day school attendance...
Months in session...
Cost to Government 5.

60

63

10 $7,310.91

Missionary work.-No missionary has ever labored among these Indians.

Act of Congre88.-By an act of March 3, 1865, making appropriations for the year 1866, “the land lying west of a direct line from Half-way Bend to Corner Rock, on the Colorado River, containing 75,000 acres, was set apart for an Indian reservation for the Indians of said river and its tributaries."

Executive order 8.7

EXECUTIVE MANSION, November 22, 1873. It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country in the Territory of Arizona be withdrawn from sale and added to the reservation set apart for the Indians of the Colorado River and its tributaries, by act of Congress, approved March 3, 1865 (U. S. Stat. at Large, Vol. 13, p. 559), viz: All that section of bottomland adjoining the Colorado Reserve, and extending from that reserve on the north side to within 6 miles of Ehrenberg on the south, bounded on the west by the Colorado River, and east by mountains and mesas.

U. S. GRANT.

EXECUTIVE Mansion, November 16, 1874. It is hereby ordered that a tract of country embraced within the following-described boundaries, which covers and adds to the present reservation, as set apart by act of Report of Indian Commissioner, 1882, p. 1. ? Ibid., 1884, p. 285. 3 I bid., 1881,

* I bid., 1883, p. 4. 5 Ibid., 1886, p. LXXXVIII. s United States Statutes at Large, Vol. XIII, p. 559. Report of Indian Comunissioner, 1882, p. 244.

P. 3.

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Congress approved March 3, 1865 (Stat. at Large, Vol. 13, p. 559), and enlarged by executive order dated November 22, 1873, viz:

Beginning at a point where the La Paz Arroyo enters the Colorado River, 4 miles above Ehrenberg; thence easterly with said Arroyo to a point south of the crest of La Paz Mountain; thence with said crest of mountain in a northerly direction to the top of Black Mountain; thence in a northwesterly direction across the Colorado River to the top of Monument Peak, in the State of California; thence southwesterly in a straight line to the top of Riverside Mountain, California; thence in a suutheasterly direction to the point of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and set apart as the reservation for the Indians of the Colorado River and its tributaries.

U. S. GRANT.

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Executire order, May 15, 1876.—Whereas an executive order was issued November 16, 1874, defining the limits of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, which purported to cover, but did not, all the lands theretofore set apart by act of Congress approved March 3, 1865, and executive order dated November 22, 1873; and whereas the order of November 16, 1874, did not revoke the order of November 22, 1873, it is hereby ordered that all lands withdrawn from sale by either of these orders are still set apart for Indian purposes; and the following are hereby declared to be the boundaries of the Colorado River Indian Reservation in Arizona and California, viz:

“Beginning at a point where La Paz Arroyo enters the Colorado River and 4 miles above Ehrenberg; thence easterly with said Arroyo to a point south of the crest of La Paz Mountain; thence with said mountain crest in a northerly direction to the top of Black Mountain ; thence in a northwesterly direction over the Colorado River to the top of Monament Peak, in the State of California ; thence southwesterly in a straight line to the top of Riverside Mountain, California ; thence in a direct line towards the place of beginning to the west bank of the Colorado River; thence down said west bank to a point opposite the place of beginning; thence to the place of beginning."

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HUALPAI RESERVATION.

Hou established.-Executive order, January 4, 1883.
Area and survey.-Contains 730,880 acres. Not surveyed.
Acres cultirated.-Not reported.

Tribestand population.—The tribe living here are the Hualpai, num. bering 620.

Location. Located on a bend of the Colorado River, in the northwestern part of Arizona Territory. The reservation includes "little arable land," and "the water is in such small quantities, and the country is so rocky and devoid of grass, that it would not be available for stockraising."5

Gorernment rations.- None reported.
Mills and employés.--None reported.
Indian police.- None reported.
Indian court of offences.- None reported.

School population, attendance, and support.—Estimated at about 140.6
No school provided.

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1

Report of Indian Commissioner, 1882, p. 244. ? lbid., p. 236. ibid., p. 284. 5 Ibid., 1881, p. 46. 6 I bid., 1886, p. XXXVI.

3 Ibid., p. 256.

Missionary work.-No missionary work has been undertaken among this tribe.

Executire order, January 4, 1883.-It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country situated in the Territory of Arizona be, and the same is hereby, set aside and reserved for the use and occupancy of the Hualpai Indians, namely: Beginning at a point on the Colorado River 5 miles eastward of Tinnakah Spring; thence south 20 miles to crest of high mesa; thence south 40 degrees east 25 miles to a point of Music Mou ins; thence east 15 miles; thence north 50 degrees east 35 miles; thence north 30 miles to the Colorado River; thence along said river to the place of beginning; the southern boundary being at least 2 miles south of Peach Spring, and the eastern boundary at least 2 miles east of Pine Spring; all bearings and distances being approximate.

SUPPAI RESERVATION. Hor established.-By executive orders, June 8 and November 23, 1880, and March 31, 1882.

Area and survey.-Contains 38,400 acres. Out-boundaries surveyed. Acres cultivated.-Not reported.

Tribes and population. The tribe living here are the Suppai. Population, 214.3

Location.—The village of the Suppai is situated upon Cataract Creek, a southern branch of the Colorado River in the northwestern part or Arizona.

Government rations.-None reported.
Mills and Indian employés.- None reported.
Indian police.- None reported.
Indian court of offences.—None reported.

School population, attendance, and support.- Estimated at 50. No school provided.

Missionary work.- None reported.

Executive order, June 8, 1880.-It is hereby ordered that the following-described country, lying within the boundaries of the Territory of Arizona, viz: Beginning at a point in the middle of Cataract Creek, 2 miles below the lowest fall south of the settlement of the Sappai Indians; thence due east 24 miles; thence in a northerly direction 12 miles to a point 24 miles due east of the middle of said creek; thence due west 5 miles; thence in a southerly direction 12 miles to a point 24 miles due west of the middle of said creek; thence due east 24 miles to the place of beginning, to embrace the settlements and improvements of the Suppai Indians, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement and set apart for the use and occupancy of said Suppai Indians. (Indian Commissioner's Report, 1886, p. 297.)

Executive order, November 23, 1880.-It is hereby ordered that the following-described country, lying within the boundaries of the Territory of Arizona, viz: Beginning at a point in the middle of Cataract Creek, 2 miles below the lowest fall north of the settlement of the Suppai Indians; thence due east 24 miles; thence in a southerly direction 12 miles to a point 24 miles due east of the middle of said creek; thence due west 5 miles; thence in a northerly direction 12 miles to a point 24 miles due west of the middle of said creek; thence due east 24 miles to the place of beginning, to embrace the settlements and improvements of the Suppai Indians, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement, and set apart for the use and occupancy Report of Indian Commissioner, 1883, p. 221. * Ibid., 1884, p. 256.

3 Ibid., * Ibid., 1886, p. 392.

p. 284.

of said Suppai Indians, and the Executive order dated June 8, 1880, withdrawing from sale and setting apart a reservation for said Indians is liereby revoked. (Indian Commissioner's Report, 1886, p. 297.)

Executive order, March 31, 18-2. It is hereby ordered that the following-described country lying within the boundaries of the Territory of Arizona, viz: So much of the bottom land of the cañon of Cataract Creek, bounded by walls of red sand-stone on the east and west, as is included within certain lines, viz, on the south, an east and west line (magnetic) crossing said cañon at a narrow pass marked by a monument of stone placed in tho summer of 1881 by Lieutenant Carl Palfrey, of the Corps of Engi. neers of the Army, about 2 miles above the village of the Yavai Suppai Indians; and on the north, a line bearing N. 55° E. (magnetic) crossing said cañon at the crest of the third falls of Cataract Creek, and marked by Lieutenant Palfrey by two monuments of stone, one on each side of the stream, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from salo and settlement, and set apart for the use and occupancy of said Yavai Suppai Indians, and the Executive order dated November 23, 1880, withdrawing from sale and settlement and setting apart a reservation for said Indians, is hereby revoked. (Indian Commissioner's Report, 1836, p. 298.)

PIMA AGENCY.
[Post-office address, Sacaton, Pinal County, Arizona.]

GILA RIVER RESERVATION.

How established.-By act of Congress, February 28, 1859; Executive orders, August 31, 1876, January 10, 1879, June 14, 1879, May 5, 1882, and November 15, 1883.

Area and survey.-Contains 357,120 acres.? Tillable acres not reported. Partially surveyed.

Acres cultivated.-Not reported.

Tribes and population. The tribes living here are the Marikopa and Pima. Population, 5,374."

Location.-Located on the Gila River, a miniature stream, such as would be termed a creek in any part of the Eastern States. The reservation has but little timber, composed of cottonwood, willow, and mesquit. Irrigation is necessary to agriculture, and the Indians as well as the settlers are entirely dependent on the Gila River for water to irrigate their farms.

Government rations.- None reported.

Mills and Indian employés.-A grist-mill. No Inaian employés reported.

Indian police.- None reported.
Indian court of offences.- None reported.

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School population and attendance." School population, including Gila Bend and Salt River Reservations, as estimated in 1886

950 Boarding-school accommodation

90 Average attendance......

91 Months in session

9 Cost to Government...

$6,679,50

1 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1884, p. 250. * Ibid., 1886, p. LXXXVIII.

2 Ibid, p. 284.

3 Ibid, 1878, p. 2.

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