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be used to maintain peaceable relations with the Indians, the superintendent is of opinion that it is of great importance to provide for crops, and that to do so an agent in each instance is necessary. As this last-named selection has not been defined by any specific boundaries, and no sufficient description is given as to soil, climate, and suitableness for Indian purposes, to enable the Departmeirt to determine the matter understandingly, of course nothing definite can now be done. But it may not be improper to consider the subject in connection with the general intent as to the particular locality in which it is proposed to make the location.

The reserve proposed on the Klamath River and Pacific Coast does not appear from the map of the State of California to be very far removed from Cape Mendocino, or a point between that and Russian River; and as provision is made only for two reserves in the State other than those already in operation, the question arises whether it should not be situated farther in the interior or perhaps eastern part of the State than the point referred to. The Noome Lacke Reserve is situated in one of the Sacramento valleys, at about the latitude of 40° north and 1220 of longitude west, about the centre of that portion of the State north of the port of San Francisco. As, therefore, the proposed Klamath Reserve, being northwest from the Noome Lacke Reservation, would appear to be adapted to the convenient use of the Indians in that direction, the question is suggested whether the other reserve should not be located farther east and north, say, on the tributaries of either Pitt or Feather Rivers. As in the case of the proposed reserve of the Klamath, I am desirous of obtaining your opinion, and that of the President of the United States, with such decision as may be arrived at under the circumstances, in season to communicate the same by the next California mail, for the government of the action of Superintendent Henley. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. W. MANYPENNY,

Commissioner. Hon. R. MCCLELLAND, Secretary of the Interior.

NOVEMBER 12, 1855. Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith the report from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs of the 10th instant, and its accompanying papers, having relation to two of the reservations in California for Indian purposes, authorized by the act of 3d March last.

The precise limits of but one of the reservations, viz, a strip of territory commenc. ing at the Pacific Ocean and extending 1 mile in width on each side of the Klamath River, are given, no sufficient data being furnished to justify any definite action on the other.

I recommend your approval of the proposed Klamath Reservation, with the provision, however, that upon a survey of the tract a sufficient quantity be cut off from the upper end thereof to bring it within the limit of 25,000 acres authorized by law. Respectfully, your obediert servant,

R. MCCLELLAND,

Secretary. The PRESIDENT. Let the reservation be made, as proposed.

FRANKLIN PIERCE, NOVEMBER 16, 1855.

Mendocinu Reservation."

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

April 16, 1856. SIR: Referring to the report I had the honor to submit for your consideration on the 10th of November last, relative to the establishment of a military reservation for the

Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, pp. 302, 304.

benefit of the Indians of northern California, upon both sides of the Klamath River, from its mouth the distance of 20 miles up the same; and to the remarks then made upon the subject of establishing a third similar reservation as proposed by the superintendent of Indians affairs in California, at Cape Mendocino, or at some point between that place and Russian River, or, as appeared to this office at that time more expedient, farther in the interior and easterly part of the State, I have now respectfully to call yonr attention again to the subject, and to submit for your consideration the following documents:

From these documents it appears that the section between the Noyo River on the south and Bee-da-loe or Hale Creek on the north, extending from the coast on the west to the Coast Mountains, combines advantages which are not to be found in any of the other locations examined, reference being had to the purposes for which it is required and to the habits and necessities of the Indians.

The tract intended for the reservation lies between the south bank of the Noyo River, so as to include that river, and a point 1 mile north of the mouth of Hale or Bee-da-loe Creek, extending eastward from the coast for quantity so as to include the valleys beyond the first range of hills to the Coast Mountains, conforming to their shape. Its geographical position is in Mendocino County, about 170 miles from San Francisco, and 80 miles south of Cape Mendocino, 70 miles northwest of Clear Lake, and about 180 miles from Sacramento City.

It is proposed to embrace within the limits of the reservation 25,000 acres of land.

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If upon an examination of the subject you shall come to a similar conclusion, I have respectfully to request that the proposition may be laid before the President of the United States for his approval, and that the superintendent may be enabled to carry out with him, on his return to his post by the steamer of the 20th instant, such decision as may be made in the premises. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE W. MANYPENNY,

Commissioner. Hon. R. MCCLELLAND,

Secretary of the Interior.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, April 17, 1856. Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith a report from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs of the 16th instant, and accompanying papers, in relation to the establishment of a military reserve of land for Indians in California, authorized by act of Congress

of the 3d of March, 1855. The tract of country, containing about 25,000 acres, proposed to be selected is in Mendocino County, and fully described in the papers accompanying the Commissioner's report.

Concurring with the Commissioner in his views of the matter, I recommend your approval of the proposed reservation. I am, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant,

R. MCCLELLAND, Secretary.

MAY 22, .1856. Let the proposed reservation within referred to be made as recommended in letter of Secretary of the Interior of April 17, 1856.

FR. PIERCE,

(Restored to the public domain by the sixth section of the act of Congress approved July 27, 1868, 15 Stats., 223.)

Smith Rirer Reserre. !

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

April 9, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to submit for your consideration a report from Agent Hanson, of February 14, and also his letter, with accompanying papers, of February 28, 1862, relative to the destruction by flood of the Klamath Reservation in California, and the selection of a new reservation in the Smith River Valley, with a map thereof as submitted by him.

The report baving already been submitted to the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, and understood to meet their approval, I would respectfully recommend, should it meet with your concurrence, that the President be requested to cause such portions of the proposed reservation as have been proclaimed for sale, and are not included in the purchases made by Agent Hanson from individuals, to be withdrawn from sale, and that the local land office be instructed to respect the same as an Indian reservation until otherwise ordered. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. P. Dole,

Commissioner. Hon. CALEB B. Smith, Secretary of the Interior.

(Indorsement.) The lands embraced in the proposed reservation may be withdrawn from sale for the present.

C. B. SMITH.
MAY 3, 1862.
The lands referred to were in townships 17, 18, and 19, lying upon the Pacific
Ocean, in Del Norte County. This reserve was discontinued by act of Congress ap-
proved July 27, 1868 (15 Stats., 221).

MISSION AGENCY.
[Post-office address : Colton, Cal.]

MISSION RESERVATIONS. How established.-By executive orders, December 27, 1875; May 15, 1876; May 3, August 25, September 29, 1877; January 17, 1880; March 2, March 9, 1881 ; June 27, July 24, 1882; February 5, June 19, 1883; January 25, March 22, 1886.

Area and surrey.-Contains 161,217 acres;- tillable acres not reported. Not surveyed. Three thousand dollars appropriated in 1885 for resurveying and marking.

Acres cultirated. The Indians have under cultivation 5,200 acres.3

Tribes and population.—The tribes living here are the Coahuila, Die. genes, San Luis Rey, Serranos, and Temecula.? Total population, 3,096.4

Location.–At least two-thirds of the whole number live in San Diego County; nearly all the remainder in the county of San Bernar. dino, and a small number in Los Angeles County. They live in about twenty villages, generally on reservations, the nearest being about 30 miles and the farthest about 120 miles from the agency at San BernarReport of Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. 312. I bid., 1884, p. 256.

3 I bid., p. 304. * Ibid., 1881, p. 392.

S. Ex. 95-15

dino. Here and there lands have been reserved for the Mission Indians, but its character is such that very little of it is of any practical use, and very few comparatively are living on the land so reserved.?

Gorernment rations.-Two per cent of these Indians subsisted by Gov. traillent rations in 1886.3

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Total school population in 1886, 800.

Missionary work.—The missionary work performed during the year was by the school teachers, with occasional, but few, church services by the Roman Catholics.5

Mission Indian Reserres.6
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

January 27, 1870. To the PRESIDENT:

The accompanying papers are respectfully submitted to the President, with the request that the following lands in California be set apart as reservations for the Mission Indians in the southern portion of that State, being the San Pasqual and Pala Valleys, and recommended by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, viz: Townships 12 and 13 south, of ranges 1 east and 1 west, of the San Bernardino meridian, and township 9 south, of ranges 1 and 2 west, of the San Bernardino meridian. With great respect, your obedient servant,

J. D. Cox, Secretary.

January 31, 1870. Let the lands designated in the foregoing letter of the Secretary of the Interior be set apart as reservations for Indian purposes, as therein recommended.

U. S. GRANT. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

Washington, D. C., February 13, 1871. Sir: I have the honor to call your attention to a report from this office, dated January 15, 1870, in which was inclosed a letter from J. B. McIntosh, brevet major-general U. S. Army, and superintendent of Indian affairs for California, dated December 27, 1869, and report of Lieut. A. P. Greene, U. S. Army, agent for Mission Indians in southern California, dated Los Angeles, Cal., December 16, 1869, recommending that San Pasqual and Pala Valleys, in southern California, be set apart as reservations for the Mission Indians of said State.

In my report, above referred to, I recommend that the following described lands 1 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1884, p. 12. 2 Ibid., 1879, p. 13. 3 Ibid., 1886,

* Ibid., p. lxxxviii. * Ibid., 1881, p. 14. 6 Ibid , 1886, pp. 304-8.

2

P. 412.

should be set apart for said reservations, viz: Townships 12 and 13 south, of ranges 1 east and I west, and township 9 south, of ranges 1 and 2 west, of the San Bernardino meridian, California.

My recommendation, meeting with the approval of the Secretary of the Interior, was forwarded to the President, who, on the 31st of January, 1870, ordered that the above designated lands should be set apart as reservations for Indian purposes.

It appears from the papers transmitted herewith that the citizens of San Diego County protest against the order of the President setting apart said lands for Indian reservations; that the Indians are unanimously opposed to going on said reservations; that citizens have made valuable improvements thereon, and that there are but few Indians on the lands set apart as aforesaid ; that recent gold discoveries have attracted a large immigration thither; and the opinion of the press, together with other evidence, would indicate that it would be for the best interests and welfare of the Indians, as well as others, that the order of the President setting apart said lands for Indian purposes should be rescindod.

In view of these facts I would therefore respectfully recommend that the order of the President be revoked, and that the aforesaid reservations be again restored to the public domain. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. S. PARKER,

Commissioner.
Hon. C. DELANO,
Secretary of the Interior.

(First indorsement.)
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

February 15, 1871. Commissioner transmits papers in reference to San Pasqual avd Pala Valley Reserrations in southern California, and recommends that the order of the President setting apart the same be revoked and the lands restored to the public domain.

(Second indorsement.)
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

February 17, 1871, The within recommendation of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs is respectfully submitted to the President, with the request that the order of the Executive for the restoration to the public domain of the lands referred to be given.

C. DELANO,

Secretary of the Interior. Approved, February 17, 1871.

U. S. GRANT. Executire orders by Presidents Grant, Hayes, and Arthur. December 27, 1875.- It is hereby ordered that the following-described lands (San Bernardino base and meridian) in the county of San Diego, Cal., viz:

Protrero, including Rincon, Gapich, and La Joya, towuship 10 south, range 1 east, sections 16, 23, 25, 26, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, and fractional sections 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, and 29;

Coahuila, township 7 south, range 2 east, sections 25, 26, 27, 28, 33, 34, 35, and 36; township 7 south, range 3 east, sections 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, and 35; town. ship 8 south, range 2 east, sections 1, 2, 3, and 4; township 8 south, range 3 east, sections 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6;

Capitan Grande, township 14 south, range 2 east, sections 25, 26, 27, 34, 35, and 36; township 14 south, range 3 east, sections 31 and 32; township 15 south, range 2 east, sections 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, and 10; township 15 south, range 3 east, sections 5 and 6;

Santa Ysabel, including Mesa Grande, township 11 south, range 2 east, south half of section 21, northwest quarter, and east half of section 28, and sections 25, 26, and 27;

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