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Offenders to be delivered up to be punished by the United States, and any person committing injury upon the Indians shall be punished according to law. The chiefs promise to take means to recover property stolen from citizens, and the United States guaranties full indemnification to tho Indians, upon sufficient proof, for any property stolen from them. Any white men resident upon the reservation to be delivered up upon the requisition of the President. (Art. 6.)

The Indians promise not to provide arms or ammunition to any Indians at war with the United States. (Art. 7.)

Proclaimed February 6, 1826."

Treaty with Ricara tribe, made at Ricara village, July 18, 1825.

Peace and friendship established. (Art. 1.)
Supremacy of United States acknowledged. (Art. 2.)
United States extends protection to tribe. (Art. 3.)
None but citizens to trade, and President to designate the places. (Art. 4.)

Tribe to protect person and property of traders, to deliver up foreigners or other unauthorized persons, to give safe conduct through their country. (Art. 5.)

Dificulties to be referred to the United States, offenders to be punished according to law, stolen property to be returned or indemnification made by both Indians and citizens. (Art. 6.)

No guns or ammunition to be furnished by Indians to persons hostile to the United States. (Art. 7.)

Proclaimed February 6, 1826.2

Treaty with Minnetaree tribe made at Lower Mandan village, July 30, 1825.

Treaty identical with that made with the Ricara tribe, July 18, 1825.
Proclaimed February 6, 1826.3

Unratified agreement made at Fort Berthold, Dak., July 27, 1866, between the United

States and the Indians of the Upper Missouri and the Arickaree tribes.*

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The Indians convey to the United States the right to lay out and construct roads, highways, and telegraph lines through their country, and also agree to prevent any interruption therewith. (Art. 3.)

Perpetual peace established. (Art. 1.)
Peace to be kept with other tribes. (Arts. 2 and 5.)

Acknowledge dependence upon the United States, agree to obey laws made by Congress and assist in enforcing them, to deliver up offenders against treaties and laws. (Art. 5.)

No white person, unless authorized by the United States, to reside or make settlement in the country belonging to the Indians. Lands not to be alienated except to the United States. (Art. 4.)

Indians using liquors to forfeit claim to annuity for the current year. (Art. 6.)

The United States to pay $10,000 amually for twenty years after the ratification of treaty; $3,000 expended at the discretion of the President for stock, agricultural implements, employment of mechanics, and for the support of the sick, infirm, and orphans. The President to determine the proportion of aunuities to be distributed. The sum of $200 per annum to each head chief; $50 to soldier chiefs and eight leading men so long as faithful to treaty obligations. (Art. 7.)

United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 264. 2 United States Statutes, Vol. VII, p. 259. 3 Ibid., Vol. VII, p. 261. 4 For unratified treaty of September 17, 1851, between United States and Indians residing south of the Missouri and east of the Rocky Mountains, including Mandans, see Blackfoot treaties, in Montana.

For violation of agreement the President may withhold any portion or all of annuities. (Art. 8.)

Annuities not to be liable for debt. (Art. 9.)

“This treaty shall be obligatory upon the aforesaid tribe of Indians from the date hereof and upon the United States so soon as the same shall be ratified by the President and the Senate.” (Art. 10.)

Any amendment by the Senate not materially changing the treaty shall be considered final and binding on the Indians. (Art 11.)

The Gros Ventres and Mandan tribes become parties in the foregoing treaty. The Arickarees, Gros Ventres, and Mandans unite in ceding the following lands :

“Beginning on the Missouri River at the mouth of Snake River, about 30 miles below Fort Berthold; thence up Snake River and in a northeast direction 25 miles; thence southwardly parallel to the Missouri River to a point opposite and 25 miles east of old Fort Clarke; thence west to a point on the Missouri River opposite to old Fort Clarke; thence up the Missouri River to the place of beginning: Provided, That the territory shall not be a harbor for Indians hostile to the parties to this treaty, whom the United States agrees to protect in the occupation of their homes and enjoyment of civil rights in the same manner as white people.” (Art. 1 of Addenda.)

United States to pay $10,000 annually, to be divided equally between the Gros Ventres and Mandans. Money to be expended in goods at discretion of the President ; 20 per cent. for purposes specified in article 7. To head chiefs of Gros Ventres and Mandans, $200 annually; to sis soldier chiefs of Gros Ventres, $50 annually; to nine sol. dier chiefs of Mandans, $50 annually. (Art. 2 of Addenda.'

(Indian Laws, p. 322.)

HEADQUARTERS, FORT STEVENSON,

September 25, 1869. Sir: I have the honor to report that I have consulted the best guides and obtained all available information in addition to my own examination, as far as it was practi. cable, in regard to a reservation for the Arickaree, Gros Ventre, and Mandan Indians.

I had an interview with the chiefs of the three tribes, and read the communication from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, forwarded to me from the commanding gen. eral of the department, with which they seemed much pleased. I proposed to them the following reservation, with which they were satisfied: From a point on the Mis. souri River 4 miles below the Indian village (Berthold), in a northeast direction 3 miles (so as to include the wood and grazing around the village); from this point a line running so as to strike the Missouri River at the juction of Little Knife River with it; thence along the left bank of the Missouri River to the mouth of the Yellowstone River, along the south bank of the Yellowstone River to the Powder River, up the Powder River to where the Little Powder River unites with it; thence in a direct line across to the starting point, 4 miles below Berthold. The Indians desired that the reservation should extend to the Mouse River, but in view of a railroad passing over that country I did not accede to their wish. They seemed to comprehend my reason for not doing so, and were satisfied. I have endeavored in this proposed reservation to give them land enough to cultivate and for hunting and grazing purposes. I inclose a sketch of the proposed reservation. Very respectfully, sir,

S. A. WAINWRIGIIT,

Captain Tucenty-Second Infantry, Commanding Post, Bvt. Brig. Gen. 0. D. GREENE,

Adj. Gen. Dept. of Dakota, Saint Paul, linn.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

Washington, D. C., April 2, 1870. SIR: I have the honor to transmit here with a letter of Capt. S. A. Wainwright, Twenty-second United States Infantry, commanding post at Fort Stevenson, Dak., dated September 25 last, indorsed respectively by the commanding officer of the Department of Dakota and by the assistant adjutant-general of the Military Division of the Missouri, and forwarded by the Adjutant-General of the United States Army to this office, relative to setting apart of a reservation for the Arickaree, Gros Ventre, and Mandau Indians.

This has been the subject of correspondence before between Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, commanding Department of Dakota, and this oftice.

General Hancock, in a letter dated near Fort Rice, Dak., July 21, 1869, addressed to Bvt. Maj. Gen. George L. Hartsuff, assistant adjutant-general, Military Division of the Missouri (copy of which has been furnished by direction of Lieutenant-General Sheridan to this office), states that the Arickaree, Gros Ventre, and Mandan Indians, among others, complain “ that whites came on their land at Berthold and cut wood for sale to steam-boats. They want this stopped. They are willing that boats should go and cut all they want, but do not want strangers to come and sell their wood while they are starving; they want to cut and sell it themselves.”

General Hancock further states, in the letter above referred to, that he did not know whether those Indians had a reservation or not, and that he has instructed the commanding officer at Fort Stevenson to examine the country about Berthold and to recommend what portions should be set off for them.

By letter dated August 16 last General Hancock was informed by this office that by the treaty concluded at Fort Laramie October 17, 1851, which was not ratified, but was amended by the Senate, and the stipulations as amended fulfilled by the Govern. ment, the following are given as the boundaries of a reservation for the Gros Ventres Arickarees, and Mandans, viz: Commencing at the mouth of Heart River; thence up the Missouri to the mouth of Yellowstone River; thence up the Yellowstone to the mouth of Powder River; thence southeast to the head waters of the Little Missouri River; thence along the Black Hills to the head of Heart River, and down said river to the place of beginning.

A subsequent treaty was concluded with these Indians at Fort Berthold July 27, 1866. This makes no provision in regard to a reservation. The Indians, parties to the same, grant to the Uuited States the right to lay out and construct roads, highways, and telegraphs through their country, and they cede to the United States “their right and title to the following lands, situated on the northeast side of the Missouri River, to wit: Beginning on the Missouri River, at the mouth of Snake River, about 30 miles below Fort Berthold; thence up Snake River in a northeast direction 25 miles; thence southwardly, parallel to the Missouri River, to a point opposite and 25 miles east of old Fort Clarke; thence west to a point on the Missouri River opposite the old Fort Clarke; thence up the Missouri River to the placo of beginning."

This treaty has never been ratified, but appropriations have been made by Congress in accordance with its provisions. There are no treaty stipulations with these Indians relative to a reservation for them which have been ratified.

It is proper here to state that the reservation as proposed by Captain Wainwright is a part of the country belonging to the Arickaree, Gros Ventre, and Mandun Indians, according to the agreement of Fort Laramie, with the addition of a strip of land east of the Missouri River from Fort Berthold Indian village to the mouth of Little Knife River, as shown by the inclosed diagram; and I therefore respectfully recommend that an order of the Executive may be invoked directing the setting apart of a reservation for said Indians as proposed. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. S. PARKER, Hon. J. D. Cox,

Commissioner, Secretary of the Interior.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, D. C., April 12, 1870. Sir: I have the honor herewith to lay before you a communication dated the 2d instant, from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, together with the accompanying papers, reporting the selection by Captain Wainwright, Twenty-second Infantry, of a reservation for the Arickaree, Gros Ventre, and Mandan Indians, and respectfully recommend that the lands included within the boundary lines of said reserve be set apart for those Indians by Executive order, as indicated in the inclosed diagram of the same. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

J. D. Cox, The PRESIDENT.

Secretary.

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 12, 1870. Let the lands indicated in the accompanying diagram be set apart as a reservation for the Arickaree, Gros Ventre, and Mandan Indians, as recommended in the letter of the Secretary of the Interior of the 12th instant.

U. S. GRANT.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, July 13, 1880. It is hereby ordered that all that portion of the Arickaree, Gros Ventre, and Man. dan Reservations set aside by Executive order dated April 12, 1870, and known as the Fort Berthold Reservation, and situated in the Territories of Dakota and Mon. tana, respectively, lying within the following boundaries, viz: Beginning at a point where the northern 40-mile limit of the grant to the Northern Pacific Railroad intersects the present southeast boundary of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation; thence westerly with the line of said 40-mile limit to its intersection with range line between ranges 92 and 93 west of the fifth principal meridian; thence north along said range line to its intersection with the scuth bank of the Little Missouri River; thence north westerly along and up the south bank of said Little Missouri River, with the meanders thereof, to its intersection with the range line between ranges 96 and 97 west of the fifth principal meridian ; thence westerly in a straight line to the southeast corner of the Fort Buford military reservation; thence west along the south boundary of said military reservation to the south bank of the Yellowstone River, the present north west boundary of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation; thence along the present boundary of said reservation and the south bank of the Yellow. stone River to the Powder River; thence up the Powder River to where the Little Powder River unites with it; thence northeasterly in a direct line to the point of beginning,-be, and the same hereby is, restored to the public domain.

And it is further ordered, that the tract of country in the Territory of Dakota lying within the following-described boundaries, viz: beginning on the most easterly point of the present Fort Berthold Indian Reservation (on the Missouri River); thence north to the township line between townships 158 and 159 north; thence west along said township line to its intersection with the White Earth River; thence down the said White Earth River to its junction with the Missouri River; thence along the present boundary of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation and the left bank of the Missouri River to the mouth of the Little Knife River; thence southeasterly in a direct line to the point of beginning,-be, and the same hereby is, withdrawn from sale, and set apart for the use of the Arickaree, Gros Ventre, and Mandan Indians, as an addition to the present reservation in said Territory.

R. B. HAYES.' SIOUX RESERVATION.

How established.-By treaty of April 29, 1868, and Executive orders, January 11, March 16, May 20, 1875, and November 28, 1876; agreement ratified by act of Congress approved February 28, 1877, and Ex

Report of Indiau Commissioner, 1886, pp. 317–319.

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ecutive orders, August 9, 1879, and March 20, 1881. (Tract of 32,000 acres, set apart by Executive order January 24, 1882, is situated in Nebraska.)

Area and survey.-Contains 21,593,128 acres, of which 2,691,000 are classed as tillable. Partly surveyed.

Agencies.—There are five agencies on this reservation: The Cheyenne River, Crow Creek and Lower Brulé, Pine Ridge, Rose Bud, and Standing Rock.

CHEYENNE RIVER AGENCY. [Post-office address : Cheyenne River Agency, Fort Bennett, Dak.] Acres cultivated. The Indians have under cultivation 1,350 acres.

Tribes and population. The tribes living here are the Blackfeet, Min. nekonjo, Sans Arc, and Two-Kettle Sioux. Population, 2,965.4

Location." The agency is located on the west bank of the Missouri River about 8 miles below the mouth of the Big Cheyenne. The buildings stand upon about as unfertile a piece of gumbo’land as can be found along the river." 5 " The ground occupied by this agency stretches from Antelope Creek on the south to Moreau River on the north, a dis. tance of about 150 miles, and west from the Missouri River about 125 miles.” 6

Government rations.-Eighty per cent. of these Indians subsisted by Government rations in 1886.7

Mills and employés.-One mill.
Indian police.- Organized in 1878.8
Indian court of offences.-Organized in 1886.

School population, attendance, and support.P_The school population as estimated in 1886, was 767. The following table shows the accommodation, attendance, etc.:

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P. 426.

1 Report of the Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. 382. 2 I bid., pp. 426-428.

3 Ibid., * Ibid., p. 394. 5 I bid., 1883, p. 21. 6 I bid., 1884, p. 20. 7 Ibid., 1886, 1 412

* See Report, 1879, p. 23. Report of the Indian Commissioner, 1836, p. lxxxviii.

S. Ex. 95--17

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